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William Lloyd Garrison and His Times; or, Sketches Of The Anti-Slavery Movement in America, and of the Man Who Was Its Founder and Moral Leader

by Oliver Johnson, Introduction by John G. Whittier

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William Lloyd Garrison was born on December 10, 1805. Despite the title of this work, he was certainly not the founder of the Anti-Slavery Movement in America, which had long preceded him. However, he made many notable contributions to the fight for the end of the barbarous practice. He founded the American Anti-Slavery Society, initially the New England Anti-Slavery Society, and was the editor of The Liberator. He also supported women’s suffrage, which actually split the abolitionist movement to split into various factions. Garrison never joined politics however, considering it against his morals. In 1879, Garrison passed away from kidney disease after a long and meaningful life.This work was written by Garrion’s friend, Oliver Johnson. There is much focus on Garrion’s role in the abolitionist movement, with limited and static portrayals of his family. Garrison felt he was central to the abolitionist movement, which is reflected in this biography. Fellow friend, John G. Whittier also wrote a glowing introduction to this book, which was released the year that Garrison died.

John Greenleaf Whittier was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts on December 17, 1807. His family farmed, although he was able to have access to some schooling, roughly 12 weeks annually. Whittier was motivated to learn, and became self-educated, so much so that he moved from farming to becoming an editor. Unfortunately, he was of poor health, and the occupational change suited his health needs as well. He worked for a variety of publications, including Haverhill Gazette, the New England Weekly Review, American Manufacturer in Boston, and the Pennsylvania Freeman. He gained a solid reputation through his work as an editor, and then became a politician. In 1833, William Lloyd Garrison contacted Whittier for assistance with the abolitionist movement. Whittier was dedicated to the cause, and advocated tirelessly against slavery. After the close of the Civil War, he gained fame for his narrative poem, Snowbound, which reflected both Whittier’s personal mourning the loss of his family within the turmoil of the United States during the Civil War. Whittier wrote a great deal of poetry in particular, but other content regarding the horrors and incredible injustice of slavery. This work highlighting the life and experiences of William Lloyd Garrison is an excellent example. Whittier’s life is well preserved in The Whittier Home Museum, which is a National Historic Landmark located in Amesbury, MA.

 

 

 

 

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Hypnotism, and Magnetism, Mesmerism, Suggestive Therapeutics and Magnetic Healing

by L. W. de Laurence

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Perhaps appropriately, L. W. de Laurence was born on Halloween in 1868 in Cleveland, Ohio. He went on to develop the major occult publishing firm, De Laurence, Scott & Co. operating out of Chicago. In addition to selling books related to occultism, they also sold related goods. The company had its largest number of consumers in the US South and Jamaica. In addition to being a purveyor of goods, de Laurence was also a writer. Unfortunately, he also was a plagiarist, lifting the work, Pictorial Key to the Tarot, written by Arthur Edward Waite, and claiming it as his own.In 1930, de Laurence was consecrated a bishop. This helped his ideas gain more traction and acceptance. In 1936 he passed away, although his company still operates, now as the de Laurence Company, out of Michigan City, Indiana. Ironically, they purport to have to fight off imposters of de Laurence products.Hypnotism, and Magnetism, Mesmerism, Suggestive Therapeutics and Magnetic Healing is a reprinted edition that has been manually cleaned of most blemishes.

 

 

 

 

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Oriental Mysticism: A Treatise on Sufiistic and Unitarian Theosophy of the Persians

by Edward Henry Palmer

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Edward Henry Palmer put together this work that was based on a Persian manuscript, Maksad i Aksá by Azíz bin Mohammed Nafasí. The work sheds some light on Sufis, a Islamic mysticism, which is often characterized as offering the internalization and intensification of Islamic faith.As a child, Palmer enjoyed the benefit of a private teacher, although he was sadly orphaned at a young age. He began a job as a clerk, but his love was always for learning languages and different cultures. He learned Romani culture and language, and then went on to learn French and Italian. Influenced by Sayyid Abdallah, a professor at Cambridge, and a new lease on life, having successfully recovered from tuberculosis, Palmer went on to study at St. John’s College in 1863. Later, he worked on Persian, Turkish, and Arabic manuscripts held by the university. Afterwards, he was asked to join a survey of the Middle East, including Sinai. He returned, wrote about the experience, married, sadly became widowed, became a professor, left and became writing for the Standard. In 1882, an opportunity came up to join an Egyptian expedition. Unfortunately, Palmer and his group were ambushed and murdered.

 

 

 

 

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Pryings Among Private Papers: Chiefly of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

by Thomas Longueville

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Thomas Longueville wrote numerous works about the history of royalty. During his research, he came across many salacious or otherwise interesting tidbits from the Reports of the Historical Commission he often foundhimself wading in. This work is a collection of phrases, notes, diaries and other pieces of information Longueville collected. The items are arranged in numerous collections, ranging from Horse-Dealing and Cock-Fighting to Funerals, Clerical, and Ireland.Thomas Longueville (1844-1922) was born in Oswestry, Shropshire, England. He wrote numerous works, especially biographies, but also wrote other non-fiction books. Some of his works include Marshall Turenne, The Life of a Conspirator: Being a Biography of Sir Everard Digby by One of His Descendants, Policy and Paint: or, Some Incidents in the Lives of Dudley Carleton and Peter Paul Rubens, The Curious Case of Lady Purbeck: A Scandal of the XVIIth Century.

This new edition is dedicated to Oscar Margatts as he climbs the mountain of scholarship.

 

 

 

 

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Wine, Women, and Song: Medieval Latin Students’ Songs Now First Translated into English Verse with an Essay

by John Addington Symonds

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John Addington Symonds was born on October 5, 1840 in Bristol, England. He became well known as a poet, researcher, and teacher. Biographers have often remarked on Symonds’ bisexuality as being a significant influence on his life. He was in multiple relations with men and women throughout his life. These relationships often overlapped. For example, while married to his wife, Janet Catherine North, he enjoyed a four year relationship with Norman Moor. Controversially, Symonds was interested in and advocated for pederastic relationships. Moor was in his teens when he was romantically involved with Symonds. In 1873, Symonds wrote A Problem in Greek Ethics, which was a historical, detailed look at pederastic relationships in early Greek history. Much of Symonds works have not been published because they often dealt with homosexuality and were considered very taboo.

 

 

 

 

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Speech and Manners for Home and School

by Miss E. S. Kirkland

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E. S. Kirkland wrote books intended for children regarding domesticity in general. Her most popular book was Six Little Cooks, aiming to teach children how to cook, along with some specially selected recipes. When first released, Speech and Manners for Home and School was advertised with the following:”This book…is intended to call the attention of young people to the correct use of their mother-tongue, and to furnish some hints in regard to the most common violations of good breeding. The readers will probably find themselves conscience-stricken at the thought of their own frequent violations against “The King’s English,” not to speak of the points connected more especially with juvenile life and comprised under the general name of Manners.”

 

 

 

 

The Life of Friedrich Nietzsche

by Daniel Halévy, Translated by J. M. Hone, Introduced by T. M. Kettle

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Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) has had a profound impact on our way of life. Among other things, he was a philosopher, a poet, and a scholar. Unfortunately, he suffered from poor health, which caused him to resign from his position as the Chair of Classical Philology, which he held at the age of 24. At 44, he was so ill that his mother, and then his sister, had to care for him until his death at the age of 55. Nietzsche wrote on numerous subjects, but is commonly associated with nihilism, critiques of Christian morality, and his strong opposition to anti-Semitism and nationalism. There was a brief time when his sister reworked his manuscripts to favor Nazi ideology, but the correct manuscripts were uncovered. Many scholars have written about Nietzsche.Daniel Halévy was a French historian born in December 1872. One of his most well regarded works was Essay on the Acceleration of History. However, in the 1930s Halévy found himself to be a “man of the extreme right” and his questionable politics led to his work falling to the wayside.This is a reprinted work, with minor text defects as a result of age.

 

 

 

 

A Scholar’s Letters to a Young Lady: Passages from the Later Correspondence of Francis James Child

by Francis James Child

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On February 1, 1825, Francis James Child was born in Boston, Massachusetts. Although his family lived in poverty, Child benefited from the public school system in Boston. His dedication and intelligence while in school was recognized with a scholarship to attend Harvard. Child was a bit shy because of his working class background, but he became popular because of his excellent work, speech and character. In 1848, he was again recognized by a benefactor, who encouraged and paid for Child to move to Germany where he could attend graduate school. The fledgling United States did not have postgraduate institutions at the time. Child had many interests, and it was his passion for mathematics and literature that moved him to focus on speech and writing. He served for 25 years as a Professor of Rhetoric, and then Professor of English, at Harvard University. He wrote a great deal on ballads, class consciousness and composition. He also was the President of the American Folklore Society for two terms, built an incredible folklore collection at Harvard University Library.

This new edition is dedicated to Professor Guillermo De Los Reyes.

 

 

 

 

Old Stories & Sayings from India, Ceylon, Burma, and the Near East

by Isa Fyvie Mayo

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Isabella Fyvie Mayo was an incredible woman. Born in 1843 in London, she enjoyed the benefits of schooling and encouragement of her writing. She worked tirelessly to help her family, but for many years she was uncompensated for her writing. Finally, once she was published it was to great acclaim with Occupations of a Retired Life (1868). She wrote numerous books including, Not by Bread Alone (1890) and Other People’s Stairs (1898). Additionally, she wrote for many popular magazines such as the Sunday Magazine, Girls’ Own Paper, and Pa Mall Gazette.Although she often wrote under the pen name, Edward Garrett, she did much to advance women’s issues as an ardent suffragist. She even became the first woman elected to a public office in Aberdeen. She considered herself an ethical anarchist and active antiracist, especially working to provide a safe haven to those from South Asia.

Old Stories & Sayings from India, Ceylon, Burma, and the Near East is a reprinted work and has been manually cleaned of blemishes.

 

 

 

Psychic Phenomena: A Brief Account of the Physical Manifestations Observed in Psychical Research

by Edward T. Bennett, Introduction by Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge

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Edward Trusted Bennett was born on July 1, 1831 in London. He was trained as a botanist, as was his younger brother, Alfred William Bennett. He was a Quaker, but after supporting the views of Charles Voysey, a priest in the Church of England who was condemned and then went on to found a theist church, Bennett he was disowned. In his later years, he became very active within the British National Association of Spiritualists and even became the first secretary of the Society for Psychical Research. He was considered to be a dedicated, hard-working and well-liked member. Even after his retirement in 1902, he continued to publish related works, such as On the Direct Phenomena of Spiritualism. Bennett was also deeply invested in his community and, among other things, helped to begin a Saturday night concert series in Richmond, Surrey, which was very well received and attended. He passed away in 1908.

Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge enjoyed a long life filled with many unique accomplishments. Born on June 12, 1851 he worked tirelessly until his passing on August 22, 1940. He is primarily known for his work as a renowned physicist, particularly for his work on electromagnetic radiation, radio and electricity. However, he was also deeply interested in spirituality and telepathy. Lodge over blended his two interests.Arguably, this was influenced by the death of his son, Raymond Lodge during World War I. He wrote a best selling book about his son’s death and his attempts to contact him in the afterlife, entitled Raymond or Life and Death. His belief in Spiritualism strongly influenced his research, causing some debate within academic communities over his scientific findings. Lodge wrote and researched so many subjects that his papers are scattered across numerous institutions. Those seeking further information on his psychical research can find his papers at The Society for Psychical Research in the United Kingdom.

 

 

 

The New Rebellion

by Dr. Karl F. M. Sandberg

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Karl Ferdinand Marius Sandberg was a longtime member of the Socialist Party in the United States, including serving on the National Committee. He was particularly interested in the banking, currency and general monetary systems in the US. He wrote multiple works on this subject, including The Currency Problem: The Problem of The Socialist Party Today, and The Money Trust. Sandberg was deeply concerned with income inequality, and argued that the banking system was not a viable source for solving financial issues plaguing the nation, but rather that “farmers and wageworkers” needed to be the focus and origin of solutions.Dr. Sandberg was a surgeon-in-chief at the Norwegian Tabitha Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. He was also a member of the Norwegian Nationalist League in Chicago, which linked all Norwegian organizations with at least twenty members, including a singing organization, burial society, the Scandinavian-American Prohibition Club, painter’s union, shoemakers’ society, and much more.

 

 

 

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Homes of the London Poor

by Octavia Hill

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Octavia Hill was born in December 1838 into a large family of ultimately nine children. Her father was a corn merchant, but after he suffered from mental issues, he was no longer able to support his family, so his wife, Caroline Southwood Smith and her family, financially supported the family. Much of her family was deeply interested in alleviating poverty in urban settings, which influenced Hill throughout her life. Her own circumstances changed as well, having gone from comfort to poverty after her father’s illness. At the age of 13, Hill was accepted into a co-operative guild, which training in glass-painting. The guild was designed to provide employment opportunities for impoverished women. She soon began managing the guild, and heartbroken over the extreme poverty she saw her fellow child workers experienced, she began working within other organizations as well to address poverty. As part of her experiences, she was put in charge of managing three neglected homes, in hopes of improving their condition, the quality of lives of the low-income tenants and making them attractive for investment as well. This work focuses on Hill’s experiences in managing these properties, and her thoughts on how to eradicate poverty and improve the quality of life for all Londoners.Hill was very successful, and her program grew tremendously and took on other paid female professionals. She had some interesting beliefs, such as not supporting women’s suffrage and also not being supportive of welfare benefits, even for the elderly and infirm, preferring only the concept of self-sufficiency. Hill died from cancer on August 13, 1912 at the age of 73.

 

 

 

From the Heart of Israel: Jewish Tales and Types

by Rabbi Dr. Bernard Drachman

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Rabbi Dr. Bernard Drachman was born on June 27, 1861 in New York City. He received his early education at High School, Jersey City, NJ, and the Hebrew Preparatory School before going on to earn his B.A from Columbia College. Afterwards, he earned his rabbinic ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau, thanks to a scholarship. He also earned a Ph.D from the University of Heidelberg. As an American born rabbi, it was difficult for him to find a position in an Orthodox synagogue. However, he was dedicated and extremely knowledgeable and found his way to serve. He officiated as rabbi to the Oheb Sholom congregation in Newark from 1885-87, then the Congregation Beth Israel Bikkur Cholim in New York city from 1887-89, and later to that of the congregation Zichron Ephraim. He also served as a professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary.

 

 

 

 

Pioneering in Masonry: The Life and Times of Rob Morris, Masonic Poet Laureate, Together with the Story of Clara Barton and the Eastern Star

by Lucien V. Rule

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

The Early History and Antiquities of Freemasonry: As Connected with Ancient Norse Guilds, and the Oriental and Mediæval Building Fraternities

by George F. Fort

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

George Franklin Fort was born on June 30, 1809 in New Jersey and would rise to prominence in his home state. Among other things, he would serve as the Governor of New Jersey from 1851 to 1854. He began practicing medicine in 1830, but by the mid-1840s he became very involved in politics. He was largely a reform-minded candidate, and supported universal suffrage, 10-hour workdays, and ending child labor. In 1868 he left politics to practice medicine again. He passed away on April 22, 1872.

 

 

 

 

Francis Joseph and His Court: From the Memoirs of Count Roger De Rességuier

by Herbert Vivian

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Herbert Vivian was very much of an obnoxious opportunist, and later became a fascist. Born in 1865 in England, he enjoyed a life of privilege and elevated social circles. He was once friends with Oscar Wilde, but after Vivian published “The Reminiscences of a Short Life” Wilde forbid Vivian from coming near. The work caused fallout among Wilde and some of his friends. He was very involved in the Neo-Jacobite Revival, a UK political movement around the 1900s, which looked to replace British parliamentary democracy with a return to monarchy. In 1891, Vivian unsuccessfully ran for office. He still tried to remain in the political sphere, and started a few Jacobite leagues, like the Legitimist Jacobite League of Great Britain and Ireland, since he kept fighting with founding organization partners. Because his reputation in the UK was not good, he ended up becoming a travel writer to earn money and maintain some semblance of his reputation. He published a variety of books and articles on a variety of subjects, from fiction to a faulty gambling system, to mixed reviews. Sometimes he published under a pseudonym, but not to better results. In the 1930s he became a fan of fascist Italy and wrote its praises. By this time, even his attempts at non-fiction writing were advised to be considered mostly fiction. He died in 1940 to little fanfare and many sighs of relief.

 

 

 

 

The Howadji in Syria

by George William Curtis

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George William Curtis (February 24, 1824 – August 31, 1892) was born in Rhode Island, and became a well-known writer. He was deeply moved by the Transcendentalist movement, and was a member of Brook Farm for approximately one year. He traveled across Europe and the Middle East, writing for publications like Putnam’s Magazine and Harper’s Weekly. He was extremely influential in politics, working with Abraham Lincoln and becoming a powerful national speaker for the rights of African Americans and for ending slavery. He later worked with Ulysses S. Grant to reform the political system.Curtis wrote more than a dozen books, including Lotus-Eating (1852), Trumps (1862), Washington Irving: A Sketch (1891). This work is a travelogue that tells of Curtis’ experiences while in Syria.

This new edition is dedicated to Mark Hambley, scholar and interpreter of the Middle East.

 

 

 

How to Make a Violin and Violin Notes

by John Broadhouse and Ole Bull

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With an attention for detail, John Broadhouse explains how to build a violin. The work is well illustrated to help explain the process, and all the options available. Broadhouse produced numerous works, including Musical Acoustics; or, The Phenomena of Sound as Connected with Music (1892), and Henry Smart’s Compositions for the Organ (1880). Although he was deeply invested in music, he preferred to let the music speak for him and little is known about Broadhouse’s life outside of music.This edition is dedicated to the musicians of All Souls Unitarian Church, Washington D.C. extraordinary ministers of healing sounds.

 

 

 

An Outline History of Sculpture for Beginners and Students: with Complete Indexes and Numerous Illustrations

by Clara Erskine Clement

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Clara Erskine Clement was born on August 28, 1834 to John and Harriet Bethiah Erskine in St. Louis, Missouri. She was able to get an education through private tutors. After her first marriage, she relocated to Massachusetts. Throughout her life, she wrote a great deal, primarily on art history, including such works as Handbook of Legendary and Mythological Art (Boston, 1871), Stories of Art and Artists (1886), Women Artists in Europe and America (1903) and Women in the Fine Arts (1906). She loved traveling, and was known especially for her travels to Turkey, Palestine, and parts of Europe. She did not let age stop her, and climbed the Great Pyramid when she was 66. She passed away in 1916 while in Brookline, Massachusetts of chronic myocarditis. Her papers are held by Princeton University.This new edition is dedicated to the members of the National Sculpture Society.

 

 

 

Harvard Lights and Shadows: College Sketches in War Time

by Victor Rine

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In this work, Victor Rine takes a comedic approach to life at Harvard during World War I. The war figures fairly distantly in the background, as Rine highlights his experiences at Harvard. Rine ruminates on the nature of conflict, peace, and one’s role in the world. He was very interested in the experiences of soldiers and wrote several works centered around war, including My Eloquent Corpse, Where are you running to, America?, Soldier! Soldier! The Citizen, The Patriot, and The War of Two Giant Ghosts.

 

 

 

Told in the Hills: A Novel

by Marah Ellis Ryan

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Marah Ellis Ryan was born on February 27, 1860 in Pennsylvania. She wrote a great deal, especially under the pen name Ellis Martin. She is most well known for living with Hopi in Arizona. She was an theater actress for five years, but then she went on to focus on writing. She also managed a farm near Fayette Springs in Pennsylvania. Along with Told in the Hills (1891), she also wrote On Love’s Domains (1890) and Squaw Elouise (1892).Told in the Hills was a popular novel that became a motion picture in 1919. The book and film have numerous differences, especially in the ending. It revolves around a relationship between two brothers, the US government, and the Kootenai tribe (Ktunaxa) in Montana. Unfortunately, although Ryan was often billed as an expert on Indigenous Americans, she was not familiar with Ktunaxa language, and instead substituted the Chinook language, which she was knowledgeable of. Ktunaxa is a unique language in that it is a language isolate, not like any other language in the world.

 

 

 

Our Quaker Friends of Ye Olden Time: Being in part a transcript of the minute books of Cedar Creek meeting, Hanover County, and the South River Meeting, Campbell County, Va

by James Pinkney Pleasant Bell

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Publisher James Bell was moved to print these various meeting notes and announcements since his mother’s family were members of the Society of Friends. As Bell states,

“…sometimes in my early childhood I attended their meetings for worship, held in the old Meetinghouse at Golansville, in Caroline County, Va., and still retaining a love for tliese good people, I have for some time past contemplated publishing a book giving an account of their religious belief, and manner of conducting their meetings.Through a member of the Society of Friends, in Richmond, Va., I have obtained extracts from some of their old Minute books, which I hope will be of interest to my readers; I also make extracts from The Southern Friend (a religious journal published in Richmond during the Civil War)…The Friends not only liberated their own slaves, but also used every effort for the abolition of slavery. They did not allow their members to hire a slave, or take the position of overseer of slaves. The Quakers in North Carolina and Virginia were at one time a large body, but the bitter feeling against them, because of their anti-slavery views caused them to seek homes in the free States, and soon many of the meetings were so depleted that they had to be “laid down.” Doubtless many of my readers in the Western States will say, as they read these pages, “Yes, my ancestors came from Virginia.”

Bell’s collection of information sheds light on religious history in the United States, the impact of the Civil War, and how various Christian denominations used their beliefs to fight against or support the inhumane practice of slavery.

 

 

 

Foreign Freemasonry: Its Position vis-a-vis of Christianity and of Catholicity

by D. Moncrieff O’Connor

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

 

 

The Grand International Masters’ Chess Tournament at St. Petersburg, 1914

by David McKay

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For over a month, from April 21 to May 22, 1914 the top chess players from around the world converged in St. Petersburg. Play for the tournament took place at the St. Petersburg Chess Club, beginning in the afternoon and lasting through the evening. Players were treated to large banquets and winners were awarded large monetary prizes.During the tournament, players utilized a variety of unique moves, such as the Exchange Variation of the Ruy Lopez, and some surprisingly passive play for example. This work offers a breakdown of matches between such players as then world champion, Emanuel Lasker, José Raúl Capablanca, Alexander Alekhine and Aron Nimzowitsch. Though it took place over a century ago, it remains one of the strongest tournaments in chess history.

 

 

 

The Art of the Exposition: Personal Impressions of the Architecture, Sculpture, Mural Decorations, Color Scheme & Other Aesthetic Aspects of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition

by Eugen Neuhaus

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Eugen Neuhaus was born on August 18, 1879, in Germany. He moved to the United States in 1904, ultimately becoming a US citizen in 1911. He began teaching various art and design classes at colleges in northern California, including the University of California. He lectured at numerous colleges, including internationally over the years, before ultimately retiring from the University of California in 1949, at the age of 70. He died at the age of 84 in 1963, in Berkeley.

One of the highlights of Neuhaus’ career was his assistance in developing the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, held in San Francisco during 1915. This work, The Art of the Exposition, is derived from lectures he gave to the public about its design and development, which were very well received. The Panama-Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco, 1915 was an event celebrating the development of the Panama Canal. Many beautiful pieces of architecture were developed for the Exposition, perhaps the most notable being the Palace of Fine Arts. A number of members of the National Sculpture Society exhibited, and this new edition is dedicated to their memory.

 

 

The Jesters: A Simple Story in Four Acts of Verse from the French of Miguel Zamacois

by John N. Raphael

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Miguel Louis Pascal Zamacoïs was born on September 8, 1866 into a family of artists. He himself became a writer of many types, including journalism, writing for the paper, Je suis partout; multiple novels; operas and numerous other pieces for the theater, including Les Bouffons; and poetry, such as L’Arche de Noé. For his work, he received the Prix de poésie de l’Académie française in 1926. He lived until March 20, 1955, and was buried in Paris.

This new edition is dedicated to Pierre Mollier, scholar and friend.

 

 

The Masonic Genius of Robert Burns: An Address Delivered in Lodge “Quatuor Coronati,” 2076, 4th March, 1892

by Bro. Benjamin Ward Richardson

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and
availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards
“more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

Robert Burns was coronated the Poet Laureate of Freemasonry in a Scottish lodge ceremony and his Masonic odes are still today recited with gusto in lodge rooms.

This new edition is dedicated to Robert Cooper, Grand Librarian of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, and helpmate to many scholars.

 

Some African Highways: A Journey of Two American Women to Uganda and the Transvaal

by Caroline Kirkland, Introduction by Lieutenant-General Baden-Powell

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Much of this work originally appeared in the Chicago Tribune. Caroline Kirkland’s goal was to encourage other Americans, particularly women, to make the voyage into Uganda and parts of East Africa. Kirkland described her journey as “made with entire safety and great comfort…where else can you look out from railway carriage windows and see zebras, gnus, giraffes, hyneas, and even lions as you steam through a land?” While this work is greatly valuable as a travelogue by a female traveler, it is not unbound from the social mores of the time. For example, Kirkland also describes Uganda as for,

“the lover of strong contrasts, of high lights and black shadows, of wonderful scenery, of great spaces, of all that is new and free and sitting, I recommend a trip to this dark, mysterious, violent and enchanting country. We two women only touched the surface of it, but we were ever conscious of much we could not see, nor hear, nor formulate, but which exists in a land teeming with fierce and savage life.”

Kirkland took the journey with her mother, and an Italian maid, Nannina, who was to work for Kirkland’s sister residing in Central Africa. Her work includes a historical sketch, and numerous photographs.

 

Pirates with a Foreword and Sundry Decorations

by Daniel Defoe, Introduction by C. Lovat Fraser

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Daniel Defoe has a very long history of readership. Thought to have been born on September 13, 1660 as Daniel Foe, he lived until April 24, 1731. He was many things, including a writer, trader, political thinker and spy. He wrote a great deal on politics, crime, economics and business, as well as many fiction books, including classics such as Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders. Tracing down Defoe’s many works can be a challenge since he used dozens of pennames.

He was often in business, but rarely solvent. He was fortunate to have married Mary Tuffley, receiving a large dowry, which temporarily bailed him out of financial straits. Together, the pair created eight children together. Life was difficult for Mary as Defoe often found himself in jail, and when not, he was often traveling throughout Europe. As the rule of England was in upheaval, Defoe’s political pamphlets often tested the tempers of the rulers, and Defoe was often flung into prison or pressed into spying. If it wasn’t political issues, Defoe was often in or hiding from debtors’ prison.

Claud Lovat Fraser was an English artist. He was born on May 15, 1890, and died at the young age of 31 on June 18, 1921. He served during World War I, and was injured by a gas attack which harmed his lungs. Due to the damage to his physical and mental health, he was discharged. He never stopped pursing his love of art, even drawing and painting while on the battlefield. After his discharge, Fraser married Grace Inez Crawford, and together they had a child. He worked for various stationary and bookshops making stationary designs, as well as theater companies. He died from a combination of illnesses and a failed operation.

 

Lectures on Sculpture: On the Death of Thomas Banks, Antonio Conova, and John Flaxman

by John Flaxman R.A., Contributions by Sir Richard Westmacott R.A.

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John Flaxman (1755-1826) was an extraordinarily popular British sculptor, illustrator, and teacher. He earned his start by creating funerary monuments. Despite moving on to creating different sculpture forms and art in different media, he was still influenced by his early form of bas-reliefs and incorporated it into other projects. Having married an intelligent, hard working wife, Anne Denman, the pair enjoyed a lot of success and support of one another. Together they enjoyed many years in Rome, with Flaxman illustrating and sculpting a great deal. after nearly eight years, they returned to England, where Flaxman was made an Associate of the Royal Academy, where he exhibited for a few years before he was made a full Academician, where he went on to teach.

Flaxman remains an extremely influential figure. University College London has much of Flaxman’s work in terms of writings, drawings, and plasters and the famed Flaxman Gallery. Sadly, some of it was damaged during air raids of World War II.

 

Select Passages from Ancient Writers: Illustrative of the History of Greek Sculpture

by H. Stuart Jones M.A.

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Henry Stuart Jones (1867-1939) was a British scholar who worked at University of Oxford, Trinity College, and University College of Wales at Aberystwyth. He did quite well in Wales, as he learned Welsh, and served on a number of councils, such as the National Library of Wales. He was a prolific author and primarily interested in ancient Roman and Greek art and history. His other publications included Classical Rome (1910), Fresh Light on Roman Bureaucracy (1920), and The Roman Empire 29 BC–476 AD (1909).

 

A Series of Discourses Upon Architecture in England

by Rev. James Dallaway

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Rev. James Dallaway had published the successful survey Observations on English Architecture. Yet, the passing of twenty years had brought more insight, clarity, and of course further changes to the physical layout of buildings across the United Kingdom. Rather than revising the original work,
he created this volume, a collection of discourses, which included a variety of thoughts from other scholars on critical issues that had arisen. His work includes a lot of opinions of controversies about development of architecture, including his belief that Grecian architecture deeply influenced the Gothic style. He writes of the Tudor style, military architecture, and Free Masons, among other topics. Some critics have argued that his preference for certain architectural styles, such as Scottish Gothic, gives his work a biased tone when it comes to declaring some styles as superior to others. Regardless of preference, this work still despite the passage of time gives a lot of food for discussion.

 

The Old Clock Book: A History of Dials, Clocks, Watches and More

by N. Hudson Moore

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N. Hudson Moore (1857-1927) was the penname of Hannah Woodbridge Hudson, who, in person went by the nickname Nannie. In London, her books were published under the name Mrs. Hannah Woodbridge Hudson Moore. She was a passionate antiquarian and knowledgeable about furniture and design, and wrote numerous volumes about her enthusiasms, including The Lace Book (1905), The Old Furniture Book (1903), The Collector’s Manual (1906), and Delftware, Dutch and English (1908). She also wrote children’s stories and stories about flowers, including Flower Fables and Fancies (1904). She died in Boston on October 1, 1927.

 

In the Great God’s Hair: Translated from the Original Manuscript

by F. W. Bain

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F.W. Bain translated this work from the original Sanskrit, and offered this as an introduction, “The name of the little Indian gable, here presented to the lover of curiosities in an English dress, is ambiguous. We may translate it indifferently, either: The New Moon in the hair of the God of Gods, or else, She That Reduces the Pride of Gods, Demons, and all the Rest of Creation, that is the Goddess of Beauty and Fortune. To those unfamiliar with the peculiar genius of the Sanskrit language, it might seem singular, that two such different ideas should be expressible by the one and the same word. but it is just in this power of dexterous ambiguity that the beauty of that language lies.”

Francis William Bain was born on April 29, 1863 and lived until March 3, 1940. He enjoyed a wide variety of pursuits in his life, ranging from being an amateur footballer to serving as a professor of history in British India. Yet he considered himself primarily a writer, specializing in fantasy, which he claimed to have translated from Sanskrit. However, these works were not directly taken from Hindu manuscripts, but were rather a mixture of Orientalism and Bain’s interest in fantasy. Although it was revealed that Bain was lying about the origins of such works as In the Great God’s Hair, his readership was unaffected. However, it is important for readers of to know that the views that this work imparts on marriage, love, and religion, are largely those of Bain’s and not a true reflection of Hinduism.

 

Dave Darrin and the German Submarines

by H. Irving Hancock

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Harrie Irving Hancock was born on January 16, 1868 in Massachusetts, passing away on March 12, 1922. Although he was a chemist, he is recognized more for his writing. He was a journalist for several years, working for the Boston Globe, and served as a war correspondent during the Spanish-American War. He specialized in juvenile writing, although he also wrote a bit about sports, and even a series of books about physical fitness. Typically, his stories featured adventures with male hero figures, sometimes set in the past, or often in military combat. He typically wrote under his name, though occasionally used a pseudonym. He is credited with writing dozens of books, along with numerous articles for newspapers and magazines.

Hancock was enamored with Japanese fighting styles, such as Jiu-Jitsu, and not only wrote about it, he practiced the sport. Unfortunately, he was also guilty of using racial stereotypes in his works, particularly against Germans and Chinese characters, as the subtitle of his work illustrates.

 

The Quintessence Of Nietzsche

by J. M. Kennedy

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Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) has had a profound impact on our way of life. Among other things, he was a philosopher, a poet, and a scholar. Unfortunately, he suffered from poor health, which caused him to resign from his position as the Chair of Classical Philology, which he held at the age of 24. At 44, he was so ill that his mother, and then his sister had to care for him until his death at the page of 55. Nietzsche wrote on numerous subjects, but is commonly associated with nihilism, critiques of Christian morality, and his strong opposition to anti-Semitism and nationalism. There was a brief time when his sister reworked his manuscripts to favor Nazi ideology, but the correct manuscripts were uncovered. Many scholars have written about Nietzsche.

J. M. Kennedy was the pen name for John McFarland, who wrote extensively on Nietzsche. He also wrote on education, philology and war.

This new edition is dedicated to Daniel Gutierrez Sandoval and Emma Norman, who have had different views of Nietzsche.

Please note that this is a reprint of the original version, and has a few small blemishes.

 

Beasts, Men and Gods: Russia, Mongolia, Tibet and the Living Buddha

by Ferdynand Antoni Ossendowski

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If the tales by Ferdinand Ossendowski are true, then he led an extraordinary life. Ossendowski begins his account in a solitary shack in Siberia. Having heard that the police are coming for him, he sneaks off in the bitter cold, armed with an axe, guns, and many shells. Not surprisingly, after reading the initial portion of Ossendowksi’s draft, the publisher sought out a confirmed account. He was assigned a translator and critical editor to get him to offer full details. In addition to his life as an adventurer, Ossendowski considered himself a scientist as he traveled extensively throughout Asia. Given that he was was billed as a “twentieth century Robinson Crusoe” possibly the reader will be well advised that the book should be taken with a grain of salt. The account abounds with both wild adventure and ethnocentrism.

 

Modern Methods in Horology

by Grant Hood

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This book offers a history of horology to the turn of the 20th century, with chapters on watchmaking and repair. Perhaps author Grant Hood can put the aims of the book in the best perspective:

“Knowing the difficulties that present themselves to the average watchmaker as he begins serving his apprenticeship and knowing how limited the supply of knowledge he is able to find and understand I have been prompted to write these pages, hoping the information may be such that it will encourage those that are discouraged, add renewed vigor to those who are ambitious and act as a warning to the ones that are inclined to be careless with their work. My aim will be to make each subject as simple and clear as possible, adding illustrations in all cases where they are needed. If the book is successful in helping my brother workmen and shall bring to them some new ideas that shall be beneficial or shall be the means of enabling them to do their work in an easier manner, the writer will feel that his labor has not been in vain and will be well pleased.”

This new edition is dedicated to San Tun Oo, enthusiastic collector of watches.

 

Life of Brian Houghton Hodgson: British Resident at the Court of Nepal, Member of the Institute of France; Fellow of the Royal Society; a Vice-President of the Royal Asiatic Society, etc

by Sir William Wilson Hunter

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Brian Houghton Hodgson was born on February 1, 1800. His family had troubles financially, but through Hodgson’s aptitude and some family connections, he was able to continue his studies. He was especially gifted in learning languages, namely Bengali, but also Sanskrit and Persian. In 1818, with the British East India Company, Hodgson traveled to India. He held various political posts, but arguable his passion was for research and writing, particularly on Buddhist manuscripts. He was also interested in natural history. Hodgson catalogued numerous species of animals native to the area, including ollectng over 10,000 skins and specimens for the British Museum.

Hodgson was in a long-term relationship with Mehrunnisha, a local Muslim woman, and had two children. They were sent to live in Holland with Hodgson’s sister, Ellen, also known as Fanny, but neither child made it into adulthood. Mehrunnisha died in 1843. Hodgson would marry twice more before dying in London on May 23, 1894.

 

Some Letters of William Vaughn Moody

by Daniel Gregory Mason

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William Vaughn Moody was born on July 8, 1869 in Spencer, Indiana. He became an orphan at a young age when both of his parents passed. He supported himself while he was in school, going on to attend Harvard University. He graduated and then went on to become a professor at University of Chicago. In 1908, he earned a Litt.D from Yale. He wrote a great deal, including works such as The Masque of Judgment (1900), Poems (1901) and The Faith Healer (1909). Sadly, his promising life was cut short at the age of 41, as Moody had suffered from brain cancer and passed away.

This new edition is dedicated to Judy Rich Lauder, enthusiast for books of all kinds.

 

The White Morning: A Novel of the Power of the German Woman in Wartime

by Gertrude Atherton

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Born on October 30, 1857, in San Francisco, Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton was fortunate enough to be raised by her grandfather after her parents divorced when she was two. Her grandfather was Stephen Franklin, a relative of Benjamin Franklin, was deeply committed to her education. After completing school, she ended up eloping with her mother’s suitor, George H. B. Atherton, and moved to live with him and his family in Fair Oaks, California. Life was difficult, because of the constricting role of womanhood, Atherton found herself in. Sadly, her husband and son died as a result of two different tragedies.

Left alone to care for their daughter, Muriel, Atherton turned to writing. She quickly gained notoriety after her first book, The Randolphs of Redwood: A Romance was published. Her family was very disappointed because of the nature of the publication, so she traveled to New York and Paris, where her writing began to be embraced. She wrote under psuedonyms, including male ones such as Frank Lin, especially early in her career. She was an extraordinarily prolific writer, writing dozens of books in addition to writing for newspapers and magazines, along with plays and films. She was a feminist, and in this work, The White Morning, Atherton imagines the world as led by women.

 

The Story of Ab: A Tale of the Time of the Cave Man

by Stanley Waterloo

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Stanley Waterloo was a writer of many types of media, both fiction and non-fiction, and of books, essays and newspaper articles. Born in 1846, he showed a great deal of promise. He was to attend West Point, but due to an injury, Waterloo did not. He instead went into journalism after law school did not work out for him. His career in the news was quite successful, as Waterloo worked at numerous news outlets in the midwest, including the St. Louis Chronicle, the Chicago Tribune, and the Missouri Republican. He briefly started his own paper, The Day, in St. Paul, but returned to Chicago.

Towards Waterloo’s middle age, he moved into writing literature. He became extremely successful, particularly in England, with his novel, A Man and A Woman, which was released in 1892. This particular work, The Story of Ab, follows that of a caveman living in the Stone Age. Waterloo released several more novels, until his last one, A Son of the Ages, was released posthumously in 1914. A year before its release, Waterloo died of pneumonia.

This new edition is dedicated to Timothy Knab, longtime student of cultures

 

A Description and History of the Pianoforte

by A. J. Hipkins
Illustrated by John Hipkins

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Alfred James Hipkins spend a lifetime surrounded by music. Born on June 17, 1826, in England, he began his career at the age of 14, working as a piano tuner. He was such an expert at it, that by the age of 20 he was in charge of training other tuners for John Broadwood & Sons Ltd, where he worked for the rest of his life. Despite his expertise on tuning, he was not professionally trained to play, but became well-known for his ability to play, especially pieces by Chopin. He also became an esteemed writer of musically related books, namely on history and construction of instruments.

 

 

Adirondack Summer, 1969: A Novel

by Alan Robert Proctor

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“In Adirondack Summer, 1969, Alan Proctor has fashioned a marvelous world that invokes nostalgia and realism (and even magical realism) to superb effect. It’s a poignant, playful, intensely imagined book, written with grace and good humor and the kind of sentences all writers ache to produce. Highly recommended, whether you went to summer camp or not.”
—Brian Shawver, author of Aftermath and The Language of Fiction.

“I’m a big believer in good first lines to novels, and Alan Proctor grabs you from the first sentence.”
—Frank Higgins, playwright, author of Black Pearl Sings.

“This jewel of a novel … reminds readers of the vulnerability and gifts of summer …. I fell right into the characters, the setting and the drama ….”
—Denise Low, 2007-2009 Poet Laureate of Kansas, author of Melange Block and Jackalope.

“Alan Proctor’s Adirondack Summer, 1969, is a meditation on grief and loss, told with the verve of a John Irving novel. Proctor’s vivid sense of place makes the novel’s setting—an arts camp in the Adirondacks—a character in its own right. His cast, led by Deidre and Myron Cravitz, weave a gorgeous, often comic, tapestry of their delusions, loves, and dreams. Any reader booking a cabin at Camp Cravitz should prepare to be moved and entertained.”
—Whitney Terrell, author of The Good Lieutenant.

 

 

A Manual of Ancient Sculpture, Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek, Roman: With One Hundred and Sixty Illustrations

by George Redford FRCS

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Free download for National Sculpture Society members

On October 26, 1895, George Redford passed away after an illness. He had lived 80 years, his life spanning very different callings. He was remembered as one being well traveled in art circles, a fan of the old masters in particular. As the art correspondent for the London Times, his judgments were well regarded. He was worked with the Art Treasures Exhibition of Manchester, as well as serving as a Commissioners of the Leeds Exhibition. He was Registrar of the Crystal Palace Collection of Sculpture in 1853-1854; Curator of the Art Treasures Exhibition in Manchester, 1857; and Commissioner for the National Exhibition of Works of Art, Leeds, 1868. His memorable art library was sold by Christie’s, London, on March 18, 1890.

Redford had a very interesting and varied life. He was not always involved in art, as he was once on the battlefield. Redford was a medical professional who had served in the Army Medical Service during the Crimean War.

 

Old and New Unitarian Belief

by John White Chadwick

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Born in 1840, John White Chadwick was initially to become a shoemaker. Although he was in the middle of an apprenticeship, he preferred to continue a non-trade education. During his education at normal school in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, he determined his calling in life was to become a minister. He went on to graduate from Harvard Divinity School in 1864.

Almost immediately after he graduated, he became the pastor of the Second Unitarian Church, in Brooklyn, New York. He wrote a great deal, both books and contributions to journals, including Origin and Destiny (1883), Preacher and Reformer (1900), and Later Poems (1905).

 

Dry-Fly Fishing: A Guide with a Scottish Perspective

by R. C. Bridgett

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Dry-Fly Fishing is a specific style of fishing done with floating lines and flies that float, rather than typical lines and lures that sink. Most fish, particularly trouts, feed underwater, there is roughly 10% of their diet that consists of items found floating on the surface. This adds an interesting challenge for fishers, as well as a new experience to fishing. Some fishers prefer dry-fly fishing because it provides a new visual component to fishing and the catch. Adding more complexity to the experience is the development of lures to float attractively, and the process of drying the flies once they have been used is also complex. This reprint offers a look at past fishing methods and may be a source of inspiration to new and experienced fishers alike.

 

Letters of a Diplomat’s Wife, 1883-1900: Mission to London and Moscow

by Mary King Waddingto

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Mary Alsop King Waddington was born on April 28, 1833 in New York City. The daughter of a prominent academic and politician, Charles King, Mary enjoyed a life of great privilege. It helped that her grandfather, Rufus King, was a US Senator, and a one-time presidential candidate, running as a Federalist.

Her family had many ties to Europe, as her father had studied at Harrow, School in England, alongside such figures as Lord Byron. Mary’s brother became an American Minister to European missions, operating out of Rome.

In 1871, Mary traveled abroad with her family, moving to France and eventually meeting her husband, William Henry Waddington in Paris. Mary wrote extensively, often about her life as the wife of a diplomat. Her husband became the Prime Minister of France in 1879, and served in several other diplomatic positions afterwards. In addition to this work, Letters of a Diplomat’s Wife, Mary also penned Italian Letters of a Diplomat’s Wife (1905), Chateau and Country Life in France (1909) and My First Years as a Frenchwoman (1914). She also had several articles published in popular magazines, such as Scibner’s Magazine. During World War I, she raised funds to helped displaced refugees and soldiers. She passed away in Paris on June 30, 1923.

Prophets of Dissent: Essays on Maeterlinck, Strindberg, Nietzsche and Tolstoy

by Otto Heller

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Otto Heller pulls together four unique voices because he argues that they are radicals who put forth powerful theories for living. In his own words, Heller states:

However, the gathering together of Maeterlinck, Nietzsche, Strindberg, and Tolstoy under the hospitality of a common book-cover permits of a supplementary explanation on the ground of a certain fundamental likeness far stronger than their only too obvious diversities. They are, one and all, radicals in thought, and, with differing strength of intention, reformers of society, inasmuch as their speculations and aspirations are relevant to practical problems of living. And yet what gives them such a durable hold on our attention is not their particular apostolate, but the fact that their artistic impulses ascend from the subliminal regions of the inner life, and that their work somehow brings one into touch with the hidden springs of human action and human fate. This means, in effect, that all of them are mystics by original cast of mind and that notwithstanding any difference, however apparently violent, of views and theories, they follow the same introspective path towards the recognition and interpretation of the law of life. From widely separated ethical premises they thus arrive at an essentially uniform appraisal of personal happiness as a function of living.

Otto Heller was born on July 1863, and was known for being a writer and an academic, until his passing on July 29, 1941. His life spanned the Atlantic Ocean. He attended the University of Prague, among a handful of other European schools because coming to the United States in 1883. He earned his PhD from the University of Chicago in 1890. His focus was on European languages and literature. He taught at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, but his final post would be at Washington University. Eventually, he came the dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.