The Soul of a People

by H. Fielding Hall

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The Soul of a People was originally released in 1898. Written by Harold Fielding Hall, a British official sent to Burma (now Myanmar) to take part in the Burma Commission. Hall lived for many years in Burma, and wrote this account of the places, people and of Buddhism as he encountered it during his travels.

Through his understanding on Burmese Buddhism, he uses it to relate to other Burmese customs and laws, on everything from marriage, festivals, criminal justice, gender roles, and the high value placed on life in all forms found within nature. Hall writes as a liberal Christian seeking to learn more about Buddhism, and he endeavors to describe religious tenants, as well as folklore and other local beliefs and customs. This work gives a great glimpse of life in Burma during the late 1800s, while also illustrating the perils of colonialism.

This new edition is dedicated to Hera Tun Oo, energetic traveler and probing scholar.

 

A History of Japanese Mathematics

by David Eugene Smith and Yoshio Mikami

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Yoshio Mikami was an authority on wasan, native Japanese mathematics, and published multiple works on the topic in different languages. A colleague of David Eugene Smith suggested he work with Mikami to produce this volume. As Smith states in the introduction,

“The aim in writing this work has been to give a brief survey of the leading features in the development of the wasan…It is the hope of the authors that this brief survey may serve to show to the West the nature of the mathematics that was indigenous to Japan, and to strengthen the bonds that unite the scholars of the world through an increase in knowledge of and respect for the scientific attainments of a people…”

 

 

 

Old Stories & Sayings from India, Ceylon, Burma, and the Near East

by Isa Fyvie Mayo

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Isabella Fyvie Mayo was an incredible woman. Born in 1843 in London, she enjoyed the benefits of schooling and encouragement of her writing. She worked tirelessly to help her family, but for many years she was uncompensated for her writing. Finally, once she was published it was to great acclaim with Occupations of a Retired Life (1868). She wrote numerous books including, Not by Bread Alone (1890) and Other People’s Stairs (1898). Additionally, she wrote for many popular magazines such as the Sunday Magazine, Girls’ Own Paper, and Pa Mall Gazette.Although she often wrote under the pen name, Edward Garrett, she did much to advance women’s issues as an ardent suffragist. She even became the first woman elected to a public office in Aberdeen. She considered herself an ethical anarchist and active antiracist, especially working to provide a safe haven to those from South Asia.

Old Stories & Sayings from India, Ceylon, Burma, and the Near East is a reprinted work and has been manually cleaned of blemishes.

 

 

 

In the Great God’s Hair: Translated from the Original Manuscript

by F. W. Bain

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F.W. Bain translated this work from the original Sanskrit, and offered this as an introduction, “The name of the little Indian gable, here presented to the lover of curiosities in an English dress, is ambiguous. We may translate it indifferently, either: The New Moon in the hair of the God of Gods, or else, She That Reduces the Pride of Gods, Demons, and all the Rest of Creation, that is the Goddess of Beauty and Fortune. To those unfamiliar with the peculiar genius of the Sanskrit language, it might seem singular, that two such different ideas should be expressible by the one and the same word. but it is just in this power of dexterous ambiguity that the beauty of that language lies.”

Francis William Bain was born on April 29, 1863 and lived until March 3, 1940. He enjoyed a wide variety of pursuits in his life, ranging from being an amateur footballer to serving as a professor of history in British India. Yet he considered himself primarily a writer, specializing in fantasy, which he claimed to have translated from Sanskrit. However, these works were not directly taken from Hindu manuscripts, but were rather a mixture of Orientalism and Bain’s interest in fantasy. Although it was revealed that Bain was lying about the origins of such works as In the Great God’s Hair, his readership was unaffected. However, it is important for readers of to know that the views that this work imparts on marriage, love, and religion, are largely those of Bain’s and not a true reflection of Hinduism.

 

Stamped: An Anti-Travel Novel

by Kawika Guillermo

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Award-Winning Finalist in the Fiction: Literary category of the 2019 Best Book Awards sponsored by American Book Fest

Exasperated by the small-minded tyranny of his hometown, Skyler Faralan travels to Southeast Asia with $500 and a death wish. After months of wandering, he crosses paths with other dejected travelers: Sophea, a short-fused NGO worker; Arthur, a brazen expat abandoned by his wife and son; and Winston, a defiant intellectual exile. Bound by pleasure-fueled self-destruction, the group flounders from one Asian city to another, confronting the mixture of grief, betrayal, and discrimination that caused them to travel in the first place.

“Guillermo tells the stories of American expatriates seeking to lose or remake themselves in the far-flung corners of Asia. His narrative voice—steady, visual, and evocative—is complemented by his keen ear for dialogue.”
—Peter Bacho, author of Cebu and winner of the American Book Award

“Guillermo’s novel teaches the reader how to engage the world and reveals the very best about being a traveler rather than a tourist. We follow not only a vivid visual adventure across Asia, but also a linguistic journey into understanding new language and a definition of ‘we’ that is inclusive and empowering and revealing.”
—Shawn Hsu Wong, author of Homebase and American Knees

Kawika Guillermo moves and writes throughout Asia and North America, usually embarking from his station in Hong Kong. This is his first novel.

 

Donald J. Trump’s Presidency: International Perspectives

Editors: John Dixon and Max J. Skidmore

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President Donald J. Trump’s foreign policy rhetoric and actions become more understandable by reference to his personality traits, his worldview, and his view of the world. His campaign rhetoric catered to Americans comfortable with isolationism and certainly with no appetite for foreign military engagements. So, his foreign policy emphasis was on American isolationism and economic nationalism. He is not really interested in delving too deeply into some of the substantive issues of international politics, particularly the prevailing quandaries in the East Asia, Middle East and North Africa, and Central and Eastern Europe. Why bother when simple solutions will suffice, for his purposes. He has placed America’s global superpower status at risk. The gradual decline of its global influence seems inevitable.

Companion volume: John Dixon, Donald J. Trump as U.S. President: “It’s all about me!” (Westphalia Press, Washington, DC, 2018).

John Dixon is Professor of Public Administration at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. He is a fellow of the British Academy of the Social Sciences in 2004, and has been an honorary life member of the American Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars since 2006.

Max J. Skidmore is University of Missouri’s Curators’ Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Thomas Jefferson Fellow at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He has been Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer to India, and Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong.

Beijing Express: How To Understand New China

by David Baverez

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ABOUT THE BOOK

2017. The new President of France just took office. He knows his country needs radical reforms. The question is how to make his mark from the word go and how to make a clean break from his predecessors’ policies. He has an idea: instead of going to Berlin on his first official foreign visit – as is customary – why not go to Beijing? What better example is there of a country where radical reforms have met with success? In order to get a better idea of how things are changing in China, he asks someone who lives and works there and has daily contact with Chinese people to come with him.
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During the flight from Paris to Beijing on the presidential jet, he and his traveling companion have a lively, quick-fire conversation about China. What comes to light is far from the preconceived ideas held in the West. We see the true nature of the new Chinese cultural revolution, backed by technology, service industries, and the thirst for consumer goods – an unexpected source of inspiration when it comes to reforming Western economies.

ABOUT THE EDITOR

David Baverez is a private investor. He has been based in Hong Kong since 2012, where he finances and advises various starts-up. Previously, he was a fund manager for 15 years, first at Fidelity Investments in London and Boston, then as the Founding Partner of KDA Capital, a European Equity fund, until 2010.

He first published Beijing Express in France (Paris-Pékin Express – La Nouvelle Chine racontée au futur Président ; Éditions François Bourin, 2017). He is also is the author ofGénération Tonique – L’Occident est complètement à l’Ouest (Plon, 2015) and is a regular columnist in French newspapers L’Opinion and Les Echos.