Policy Perspectives from Promising New Scholars in Complexity, Volume II

Editors:  Dr. Liz Johnson and Dr. Joseph Cochran

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The world is getting more complex causing policy problems to seemingly get bigger and become more intractable. Traditional approaches and conventional methodologies alone are no longer adequate to solve policy problems in our interconnected global environment. Promising new scholars in the field of policy and complexity are breaking boundaries and laying the groundwork for innovative perspectives on how to better define policy problems, impacts, attitudes, and solutions. Whether in the field of economics, education, energy, health, human security, or transportation, the selected essays and research in this book demonstrate how essential new thinking and approaches are needed.

These scholars have demonstrated vision, imagination, diligence, passion, and courage for solving problems. Don’t miss HOW some of the top promising new scholars address problems and add to creating viable solutions to some of the biggest policy issues of our day.

 

The Politics of Impeachment

Margaret Tseng, Editor

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As changes in our political system have developed over the last two centuries, impeachment has grown even more political. The polarization of political parties, the power of interest groups and the expansion of suffrage has deeply impacted who we elect. Those elected officials, in turn, are responsible for overseeing the impeachment process, and their decisions are impacted by party dynamics, interest group influence and the desires of their constituents. While discussion about impeachment seems ubiquitous today, on the state level, impeachments of governors are extremely rare. Over 2,000 people have served as governors in the United States, but only thirteen governors have been impeached and eight removed from office.

On the national level, there have only been two presidential impeachments, but modern presidents have faced increased impeachment efforts. Every president since Ronald Reagan has faced some type of impeachment resolution from the opposing party. President Trump is no exception. Starting from his first day in office, over a million people signed an online impeachment petition and within six months of taking office he faced articles of impeachment from two Democratic congressmen.

This edited volume addresses the increased political nature of impeachment. It is meant to be a wide overview of impeachment on the federal and state level, including: the politics of bringing impeachment articles forward, the politicized impeachment proceedings, the political nature of how one conducts oneself during the proceedings and the political fallout afterwards. The group of men profiled in this book are an interesting, over-the-top group of politicians including Richard Nixon, Bill Clinton, William Sulzer, Evan Mecham, and Rod Blagojevich.

Margaret Tseng is Professor and Chair of the Department of History and Politics at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. She also serves as the director of the American Heritage Initiative at Marymount. She earned her Ph.D. from Georgetown University. She is co-editor of The Presidents as Commander-in-Chief series with the Naval Institute Press.

 

Donald J. Trump as U.S. President: “It’s all about me!”

by John Dixon, Assisted by Christina Dixon

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This is a wide-ranging book that focus the man who is the 45th president of the United States of America—Donald J. Trump. Its premise is that Trump’s rhetoric and actions become more understandable, perhaps even more predictable, in the light of his personality and his worldview and view-of-the world. It, therefore, has two goals:
• To delineate his personality traits and his worldview, so as to surmise on how he thinks about himself, others, and the world-at- large, and how he perceives and takes meaning from reality he experiences.
• To elucidate his idiosyncratic views on governance, government, the presidency, public administration, and domestic and foreign public policy.

To achieve these goals requires drawing upon concepts, frameworks, paradigms, and theories from philosophy, political science, psychology, public administration, economics, management, organizational theory, social theory, and sociology to understand his personality and worldview, and his views of the world-at-large, governance, government, and public policy.

This book is targeted at those for whom the Trump phenomenon—as a presidential candidate and as president—is both fascinating and baffling, but who are not intimately familiar with Trump the man of some notoriety or with American political institution, processes, and politics.

Companion volume: John Dixon and Max J. Skidmore (eds.), Donald J.
Trump’s Presidency: International Perspectives (Westphalia Press, Washington, DC, 2018).

John Dixon is Professor of Public Administration at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. He is a fellow of the British Academy of the Social Sciences in 2004, and has been an honorary life member of the American Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars since 2006.

 

Donald J. Trump’s Presidency: International Perspectives

Editors: John Dixon and Max J. Skidmore

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President Donald J. Trump’s foreign policy rhetoric and actions become more understandable by reference to his personality traits, his worldview, and his view of the world. His campaign rhetoric catered to Americans comfortable with isolationism and certainly with no appetite for foreign military engagements. So, his foreign policy emphasis was on American isolationism and economic nationalism. He is not really interested in delving too deeply into some of the substantive issues of international politics, particularly the prevailing quandaries in the East Asia, Middle East and North Africa, and Central and Eastern Europe. Why bother when simple solutions will suffice, for his purposes. He has placed America’s global superpower status at risk. The gradual decline of its global influence seems inevitable.

Companion volume: John Dixon, Donald J. Trump as U.S. President: “It’s all about me!” (Westphalia Press, Washington, DC, 2018).

John Dixon is Professor of Public Administration at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. He is a fellow of the British Academy of the Social Sciences in 2004, and has been an honorary life member of the American Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars since 2006.

Max J. Skidmore is University of Missouri’s Curators’ Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Thomas Jefferson Fellow at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He has been Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer to India, and Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong.

A Different Dimension: Reflections on the History of Transpersonal Thought

by Mark B. Ryan

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A Different Dimension traces the historical development of an expanded, transpersonal view of consciousness—a view that sees the human mind as reaching beyond individual, personal consciousness into realms that we call “spiritual.” It provides a rich and vital discussion of some of the most fundamental questions of our lives: questions about the nature and capacities of the human mind, and its relation to ultimate realities.

While scientifically informed, transpersonal thought challenges common assumptions of our dominant, materialistic intellectual consensus, which sees all consciousness as a product of brain function. While sympathetic to mystical experience, it seldom endorses mainstream systems of religious belief; rather, it provides intellectual substance to the trend referred to as Spiritual But Not Religious.

Focusing on key figures and their seminal ideas, Mark Ryan presents a clear and graceful account of this current in psychology, from before the discovery of the unconscious in the late 19th century, through the emergence of transpersonal psychology as an organized field in the late 1960s, to its reverberations in our contemporary world.

For 22 years, Mark Ryan taught American Studies and History at Yale University, where he was the long-term Dean of Jonathan Edwards College. Subsequently, he was Titular IV Professor of International Relations and History at the Universidad de las Américas, Puebla in Mexico, where he also served as Dean of the Colleges and Director of the graduate program in United States Studies. For 14 years a Trustee of Naropa University, he is certified as a practitioner of Holotropic Breathwork. Currently he teaches at the C.G. Jung Educational Center of Houston, the Wisdom School of Graduate Studies of Ubiquity University, and other venues.

 

Demand the Impossible: Essays in History as Activism

Editors: Nathan Wuertenberg and William Horne

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Born from the wave of activism that followed the inauguration of President Trump, Demand the Impossible asks scholars what they can do to help solve present-day crises. The twelve essays in this volume draw inspiration from present-day activists. They examine the role of history in shaping ongoing debates over monuments, racism, clean energy, health care, poverty, and the Democratic Party. Together they show the ways that the issues of today are historical expressions of power that continue to shape the present. Adequately addressing them means understanding their origins.

The way our society remembers the past has long served to cement inequality. It is no accident that the ahistorical slogan “make America great again” emerged after decades of income inequality and a generation of funding cuts to higher education. But the movement toward openly addressing injustice and inequality though historical inquiry is growing. Although many historians remain tucked away in ivory towers of their own making, we join a long tradition of activist scholars like W.E.B. Du Bois, C.L.R. James, and C. Vann Woodward, as well as a growing wave of engaged colleagues including Keri Leigh Merritt, who penned the foreword for this volume. As historians and citizens, we feel a responsibility to preserve an authentic vision of the past in a moment riddled with propaganda and lies. In doing so, we hope to help provide a framework to fight the inequities we inherited from prior generations that are repurposed and enshrined by the powerful today.

Nathan Wuertenberg is a doctoral candidate at The George Washington University. He is conducting research for a doctoral dissertation on the 1775 American invasion of Quebec, entitled “Divided We Stand: The American War for Independence, the 1775 Quebec Campaign, and the Rise of Nations in the Twilight of Colonial Empires.” William Horne is a PhD candidate at The George Washington University researching the relationship of race to labor, freedom, and capitalism in post-Civil War Louisiana. His dissertation, “Carceral State: Baton Rouge and its Plantation Environs Across Emancipation,” examines the ways in which white supremacy and capitalism each depended on restricting black freedom in the aftermath of slavery.