A Common Sense Manifesto (With a Nod to Thomas Paine, Not Karl Marx)

by Max J. Skidmore

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political situation in America, and how it came to be. It chronicles the disturbing deterioration of the Republican Party into an extreme and corrupt mechanism ready to receive and incorporate a destructive force that it welcomed wholeheartedly when it appeared in the bombastic, and completely self-centered, form of Donald Trump. Calling for a “blue tsunami,” the Manifesto outlines the way forward, out of the insanity. It notes political realities and thus accepts the need to work within the two-party system. It argues for a rational and comprehensive “Modern Political Economy” that recognizes environmental imperatives, corrects severe income and political inequality, expands Social Security, implements universal health care, protects the rights and dignity of all the people, improves America’s sagging infrastructure and transportation up to world-class and responsible standards, and ensures full participation in the national bounty in ways that protect the world and all its current and future inhabitants.

 

US Ballistic Missile Defense and Deterrence Postures: The New Cold War Era Perspective on the Wartime Use of Active Missile Defenses

by Grzegorz Nycz

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This book discusses most recent developments in the area of US ballistic missile defense with an eye on its battlefield capacities since the Kuwait war, analyzed from the perspective of deterrence postures encompassing the key post-Cold War security challenges (Middle East, Far East, Eastern Europe). The analyzed cases of missile defense engagements included (after the Desert Storm), Operation Iraqi Freedom, Israeli operations against Hamas and Yemen war. The theoretical base of the book relied on the waves of deterrence theory since the early years of the nuclear age through the deployment of thermonuclear warheads, nuclear plenty and the late Cold War revisions of deterrence paradigms.

The main body of the book is exploring the historical and probabilistic evidence on missile defense accuracy in various scenarios of its employment and differing layered short, medium and long range systems of the US counter-ballistic technologies. Historically, the missile defense investments since the early thermonuclear range were challenging the Mutual Assured Destruction paradigm. Notably, after partial marginalization of US long range missile defense concepts of the 1960s, seen as incompatible with 1972 Anti-ballistic missile treaty between the US and USSR, missile defense constructions were reinvigorated through Reagan’s 1983 Strategic Defense Initiative, while post-1976 Patriot tactical air and missile defense were gradually winning arms contracts, as in the post Cold War age the value of extended deterrence grew. New post-Cold War missile defense investments included the Middle Eastern US allies, as well as Japan and South Korea threatened by DPRK nuclear and ballistic experiments. Importantly, the value of extended missile defense engagements became broader visible in the era of New Cold War between Russia and the West, when new Aegis Ashore bases in Romania and Poland proved the theater range missile defense capacity of new NATO members.

Grzegorz Nycz, Ph.D. is adjunct professor at the Pedagogical University of Cracow’s Institute of Political Science. He graduated from Jagiellonian University and Cracow University of Economics. Ryoichi Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowship Fund Fellow 2007/2008. His research refers to U.S. security and foreign policy, with a special focus on nuclear deterrence and ballistic missile defense postures. His recent publications include monographs on strategic balance and U.S. national security policy and texts in periodicals related to ballistic missile defense investments, as well as U.S. military-political engagements in Eastern Europe, Middle East and East Asia in the time of the “New Cold War” between Russia and the West.

 

The cover is teal and features light colored outlines of a hand and a long braid. The title, All Flowers Bloom, is in black and the author's name is in red below in a strong font.

All Flowers Bloom

by Kawika Guillermo

Arriving late March 2020

Print Price: $15.99, Kindle $8.99

In a cruise ship stateroom, a soul awkens in the afterlife, still dressed in the Roman servant garbs of his previous life.

He can’t remember much, but a silent woman stands out in his memory: his first and only love.

Unable to cope with an eternity without her, he leaps from the ship and back into the depths of the life stream.

Five hundred years later, he awakens again in the same stateroom, alone and fueled with new memories of her.

In his past lives she was a male insurgent, an elderly wise woman, an unruly servant.

For a millennia the pair are tethered together, clashing in love and fear, betraying each other in times of war and famine.

Before memory drives him mad, he vows to rescue her from the stream — even if it takes a thousand lifetimes more.


“A defiant and tender call for the power of love, across a thousand lifetimes and lands. Guillermo’s imagination is breath-taking, and he shows the power of the written word as at once the most high-fidelity and stylized of mediums.”
—Ken Liu, author of The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories and The Grace of Kings

“Kawika Guillermo has achieved an ambitious feat: to chronicle a memory—and its vast empire of battles and love, constant guises and surprises—that spans over four thousand years through a narrator who, like the beloved, is blessed, or cursed, with hundreds of lives, each rebirth announcing a different milieu, a different role. At its core, All Flowers Bloom is a lover’s discourse on desire, its multiple masks and power to make lovers and strangers, and traitors and rescuers out of us.”
—R. Zamora Linmark, author of Rolling the R’s and Leche

All Flowers Bloom is a beguiling book, with an inventive narrative unlike anything I have encountered before. This is an emotional journey through lifetimes and loves and losses. Kawika Guillermo delivers wonderment and surprise, a complex universe, and an unforgettable cast of characters.”
—Doretta Lau, author of How Does a Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?

 

Anti-Poverty Measures in America: Scientism and Other Obstacles

Editors, Max J. Skidmore and Biko Koenig

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Anti-Poverty Measures in America brings together a remarkable collection of essays in two groups. The first group consists of papers dealing with the inhibiting effects of scientism—an over-dependence on scientific methodology that is prevalent in the social sciences, particularly in political science. Employing the methods of science is vital where appropriate, but other approaches often will lead to useful insights as well, some of which may be essential. Ignoring them has deleterious effects, such as discouraging the obligation to “speak truth to power.” The second group presents papers dealing with other obstacles to anti-poverty legislation in the United States.

Papers in both groups originated as presentations during annual meetings of the American Political Science Association at panels of the APSA’s Caucus on Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy; the first group from the San Francisco meeting in 2017, and the second from the 2018 meeting in Boston. All were subsequently published in the journal related to the Caucus: Poverty and Public Policy, sponsored by the Policy Studies Organization. Recognizing their value, the PSO is pleased to present these essays to the public in this volume.

The Editors:
Max J. Skidmore is University of Missouri Curators’ Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He has been Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer to India (where he was CEO of the American Studies Research Centre), and Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong (where he was elected to chair the Board of American Studies). His publications include scores of articles and book chapters, and more than two dozen books. His major emphases are American government and political history, presidents and the presidency, social legislation (especially Social Security), and ideologies and American political thought. His Ph.D. is from the University of Minnesota.

Biko Koenig is Assistant Professor of Government & Public Policy at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, PA. Trained in ethnographic, interview based, and survey research methods, his research approach is grounded in qualitative, fieldwork based, and interpretive approaches to problem solving. His ongoing research involves labor-community coalitions that focus on low income workers and public policy.

 

Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice: Volume 1

Editor: Wendell C. Wallace, PhD

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If your desire is to attain a greater understanding of theoretical frameworks, methodologies, and pragmatic discussions on criminology and criminal justice in the Caribbean, then this is the book for you. This book is a direct response to the call for a Caribbean Criminology as espoused by Ken Pryce (1976) who pointed to the “need to examine the reality of crime from a critical standpoint in the context of the Region’s history of capitalist repression and exploitation, and in terms of the Caribbean’s structural heritage of black working-class styles of protest and modes of response to oppression through slavery down to the present stage of neo-colonialism” (p. 5).

Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice is intended for academics, criminal justice professionals, students, practitioners, policymakers, and interested persons who are desirous of improving their understanding of the challenges that arise when issues related to criminology and criminal justice cross national boundaries in the Caribbean. Conceptualized and edited by the innovative, creative, and forward-thinking scholar and criminologist, Dr. Wendell C. Wallace, Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice is a MUST read for any serious practitioner with an interest in criminological and criminal justice issues that impact the Caribbean.

 

How Did I Get Here?: A Story of Interspecies Intimacies (In Nepalese Elephant Stables)

by Kim Idol

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Kim Idol is a writer/instructor at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, partial to dogs, guns, rock-climbing and backpack traveling. She has been in love with Nepal since she first visited 8 years ago. She knew she loved the outdoors and that she would love the Himalayas, but she was unexpectedly charmed by the wildlife and the people she met on her first trip and upon returning home immediately began saving and planning in order to return. Eight years later after a tough year at home, a random mouse-click on the word elephant led her to the site that described working at the elephant stables in Chitwan. So she packed up and left home journaling her experiences in Chitwan as she went.

Nepal is the mountain, the jungle and the foothills. The country is blessed and cursed with being a popular tourist destination and while its people take advantage of the luck they are also engaged in a vigorous fight to preserve their culture and protect the park and the mountains that are home to some of the last surviving members of several endangered species including the one horned rhinoceros, the Asian elephant, the sloth bear and many bird and crocodile species. This book is about the outdoors, about a culture straddling the past and the present and about a woman finding a little peace as she treks through the result. The trip changed this traveler and she suspects she might be seeing Chitwan again.

 

Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative

by Amy M. Green

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Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative posits that the 2016 film, tied narratively to the video game Final Fantasy XV, merits far more critical attention that it has received. Given that Kingsglaive is both CGI animated and erroneously seen as only a video game tie-in, it has tended to be consistently dismissed by critics. A closer examination of the film reveals a deeply complex narrative, one that contends with the lingering cultural trauma of WWII in Japan, as especially evidenced by images of fire and burning. The film also contends with the plight of refugees and immigrants, both in Japan and around the globe, as recent years have seen a drastic spike in anti-immigrant sentiment. Finally, through the film’s hero and protagonist, Nyx Ulric, Kingsglaive presents a man who is himself suffering from trauma, standing in the present, yet unable to fully imagine a future for himself.

About the author: Amy M. Green received her Ph.D. in literature from UNLV in 2009. She specialized in Shakespeare and 19th century American literature. Today, her work has evolved and she focuses her research on the exciting and evolving field of digital narrative study. She is especially interested in the expanding presence of video games as a compelling source of narrative, one that is necessarily participatory by nature. Further still, video games have long merited the right to be considered as important cultural artifacts and her study and analysis of their stories focuses especially on their historical, political, and social relevance. She also maintains her love of the written word and loves to explore how storytelling, in all of its forms, reveals important aspects of our shared humanity. Most of all, she loves her time in the classroom, sharing ideas and thoughts with students from all backgrounds. Her classes feature the close and careful study of storytelling in both written and digital forms. She is the author of three books, Storytelling in Video Games: The Art of the Digital Narrative, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Trauma, and History in Metal Gear Solid V, and A Cure for Toxic Masculinity: Male Bonding and Friendship in Final Fantasy XV as well as numerous articles.