Geopolitics of Outer Space: Global Security and Development

by Ilayda Aydin

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Civilization in the twenty-first century is characterized by its technological capacity, which is substantially realized through space technologies. A desire for increased security and rapid development is driving nation-states to engage in an intensifying competition for speed and superiority to better utilize the unique assets of space. This competition, however, is rigorously challenged by the unforgiving physical properties of the space environment such as extreme temperatures and intense fluxes of radiation, as well as by an escalation in nuclear proliferation that could end all life known to human existence. Despite these challenges, humanity is taking eager steps into space—and is taking its various geopolitical rivalries and imperatives along.Does space development further or undermine global security? Can an obsession with security pose an ironically existential threat to humanity in this most fragile yet unforgiving environment it is stepping into? This book analyses the Chinese-American space discourse from the lenses of international relations theory, history and political psychology to explore these questions.

 

Why Thirty-Three?: Searching for Masonic Origins

by S. Brent Morris, PhD, Introduction by Wallace E. Boston, Jr.

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The papers presented here represent over twenty-five years of publications by S. Brent Morris. They explore his many questions about Freemasonry, usually dealing with origins of the Craft. What “high degrees” were in the United States before 1830? What were the activities in the United States before 1801 of the Order of the Royal Secret, the precursor of the Scottish Rite? How did American grand lodges form as they broke away from England? Who were the Gormogons; how did they get started; what happened to them? Why does the Scottish Rite have thirty-three degrees?A complex organization with a lengthy pedigree like Freemasonry has many basic foundational questions waiting to be answered, and that’s what this book does: answers questions.

S. Brent Morris, 33°, Grand Cross, is Managing Editor of the Scottish Rite Journal, the largest circulation Masonic magazine in the world. He retired after twenty-five years as a mathematician with the federal government and has taught at Duke, Johns Hopkins, and George Washington Universities. He is Past Master of Patmos Lodge No. 70, Ellicott City, Maryland, and Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London; a Fellow and Mackey Scholar of the Scottish Rite Research Society; a Fellow of the Philalethes Society; an honorary Fellow of the Phylaxis Society; founding Editor of Heredom, the transactions of the Scottish Rite Research Society; indexer of Ars Quatuor Coronatorum; and Past Grand Abbot of the Society of Blue Friars. He is the author of Magic Tricks, Card Shuffling, and Dynamic Computer Memories; two U.S. patents; nine technical articles; and is author or editor of over forty books on Freemasonry including Complete Idiot’s Guide to Freemasonry and Is It True What They Say About Freemasonry? (with Arturo de Hoyos).

 

 

 

 

Adirondack Summer, 1969: A Novel

by Alan Robert Proctor

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“In Adirondack Summer, 1969, Alan Proctor has fashioned a marvelous world that invokes nostalgia and realism (and even magical realism) to superb effect. It’s a poignant, playful, intensely imagined book, written with grace and good humor and the kind of sentences all writers ache to produce. Highly recommended, whether you went to summer camp or not.”
—Brian Shawver, author of Aftermath and The Language of Fiction.

“I’m a big believer in good first lines to novels, and Alan Proctor grabs you from the first sentence.”
—Frank Higgins, playwright, author of Black Pearl Sings.

“This jewel of a novel … reminds readers of the vulnerability and gifts of summer …. I fell right into the characters, the setting and the drama ….”
—Denise Low, 2007-2009 Poet Laureate of Kansas, author of Melange Block and Jackalope.

“Alan Proctor’s Adirondack Summer, 1969, is a meditation on grief and loss, told with the verve of a John Irving novel. Proctor’s vivid sense of place makes the novel’s setting—an arts camp in the Adirondacks—a character in its own right. His cast, led by Deidre and Myron Cravitz, weave a gorgeous, often comic, tapestry of their delusions, loves, and dreams. Any reader booking a cabin at Camp Cravitz should prepare to be moved and entertained.”
—Whitney Terrell, author of The Good Lieutenant.

 

 

The Death Penalty in the Caribbean: Perspectives from the Police

Editor, Wendell C. Wallace PhD

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“The Death Penalty in the Caribbean is a novel, thought-provoking and timely contribution to the contentious debate of the Death Penalty in the Anglophone Caribbean. This book is directed at policy makers, law enforcement practitioners and scholars, and is a must read for students of criminology, international relations, political science and security studies for the light it sheds on this complex matter.”
—Dr. Suzette A. Haughton, senior lecturer of international relations and security studies, Department of Government, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus.

“The Death Penalty in the Caribbean is a clarion call to police leaders and police officers to share their views on the viability of the death penalty as a crime control mechanism for the Caribbean. The book presents cogent and reasoned discussions which are worthy of stimulating future discourse among policy makers, police leaders and academics and is very encouraging for the development of a Caribbean Jurisprudence.”
—Stephen Williams, Commissioner of Police, Trinidad and Tobago Police Service.

Many individuals have yearned to hear the voices of the often voiceless police leaders in the Caribbean. With this in mind, two controversial topics, policing and the death penalty, are skillfully interwoven into one book in order to respond to this lacuna in the region. The book carries you through a disparate range of emotions, thoughts, frustrations, successes and views as espoused by police leaders throughout the Caribbean. The book is a riveting read that will quench readers’ thirst for knowledge on the death penalty and policing as viewed through the lens of police practitioners. This book is a must read for students of criminology, law, police sciences as well as man on the street and is a great opportunity to listen to the voices of Caribbean police leaders as they bare it all for the readers. If you are interested in understanding the challenges faced by police officers, crime prevention and reduction strategies and the efficacy of the death penalty in the Caribbean, then this is a book for you.

Dr. Wendell C. Wallace is a Criminologist, Barrister and a Certified Mediator who also has over 15 years of progressive policing experience. These unique qualifications have placed him in a prime position to deliberate on the myriad of crime related issues such as the Death Penalty, obstacles to policing and crime prevention and reduction strategies that confront Caribbean countries and their police departments.

 

Stamped: An Anti-Travel Novel

by Kawika Guillermo

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Exasperated by the small-minded tyranny of his hometown, Skyler Faralan travels to Southeast Asia with $500 and a death wish. After months of wandering, he crosses paths with other dejected travelers: Sophea, a short-fused NGO worker; Arthur, a brazen expat abandoned by his wife and son; and Winston, a defiant intellectual exile. Bound by pleasure-fueled self-destruction, the group flounders from one Asian city to another, confronting the mixture of grief, betrayal, and discrimination that caused them to travel in the first place.

“Guillermo tells the stories of American expatriates seeking to lose or remake themselves in the far-flung corners of Asia. His narrative voice—steady, visual, and evocative—is complemented by his keen ear for dialogue.”
—Peter Bacho, author of Cebu and winner of the American Book Award

“Guillermo’s novel teaches the reader how to engage the world and reveals the very best about being a traveler rather than a tourist. We follow not only a vivid visual adventure across Asia, but also a linguistic journey into understanding new language and a definition of ‘we’ that is inclusive and empowering and revealing.”
—Shawn Hsu Wong, author of Homebase and American Knees

Kawika Guillermo moves and writes throughout Asia and North America, usually embarking from his station in Hong Kong. This is his first novel.

 

A Place in the Lodge: Dr. Rob Morris, Freemasonry and the Order of the Eastern Star

by Nancy Stearns Theiss PhD

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UPDATED EDITION

Ridiculed as “petticoat masonry,” critics of the Order of the Eastern Star did not deter Rob Morris’ goal to establish a Masonic organization that included women as members. As Rob Morris (1818-1888) came “into the light,” he donned his Masonic apron and carried the ideals of Freemasonry through a despairing time of American history. His voluminous writing on Freemasonry and his ability to pen poems that celebrated occasions or honored the deceased earned him the title of Poet Laureate of Freemasonry in the 19th Century. An obscure figure in American history, Morris changed the world of Freemasonry making it one of the largest fraternal organizations in the world today. This book is a revised edition in the celebration of Rob Morris’ 200th year birthday, born July 31, 1818. It is based on a collection of family letters about Rob Morris’ journey in the world of Freemasonry that took him across the continents. In this revised edition, there are more letters, details about his literary contributions and images.

 

The Great Transformation: Scottish Freemasonry 1725-1810

by Dr. Mark C. Wallace

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Modern Freemasonry emerged in Britain after 1700 as a prominent fixture in both British communal and social life. It combined earlier stonemason customs and methods of organization with the popular passion for clubs and societies. Some mocked Masonic lodges and their rituals, but they were an accepted feature on the social scene, given that they avoided political and religious discussion and swore loyalty to the existing regime. The French Revolution, however, caused a severe backlash against the masons in Britain and Europe. Despite its commitment to the establishment, Freemasonry came under suspicion. By the 1790s, lodges were viewed as convenient vehicles for radical groups to pursue covert revolutionary activities. As a result, legislation was passed which attempted to regulate these societies and eradicate any traces of secrecy. This book examines the structure, nature, and characteristics of Scottish Freemasonry in its wider British and European contexts between the years 1725 and 1810. The Enlightenment effectively crafted the modern mason and propelled Freemasonry into a new era marked by growing membership and the creation of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, with the institution becoming part of the contemporary fashion for associated activity.

Dr. Mark C. Wallace is an Associate Professor of History at Lyon College. He teaches British and Scottish history, including British Imperialism, British cultural, social, and intellectual history from the fifteenth century to the present, and the Scottish Enlightenment. A former Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, he has written extensively on Scottish Freemasonry and eighteenth-century Scottish clubs and societies.