Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative

by Amy M. Green

Purchase

Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative posits that the 2016 film, tied narratively to the video game Final Fantasy XV, merits far more critical attention that it has received. Given that Kingsglaive is both CGI animated and erroneously seen as only a video game tie-in, it has tended to be consistently dismissed by critics. A closer examination of the film reveals a deeply complex narrative, one that contends with the lingering cultural trauma of WWII in Japan, as especially evidenced by images of fire and burning. The film also contends with the plight of refugees and immigrants, both in Japan and around the globe, as recent years have seen a drastic spike in anti-immigrant sentiment. Finally, through the film’s hero and protagonist, Nyx Ulric, Kingsglaive presents a man who is himself suffering from trauma, standing in the present, yet unable to fully imagine a future for himself.

About the author: Amy M. Green received her Ph.D. in literature from UNLV in 2009. She specialized in Shakespeare and 19th century American literature. Today, her work has evolved and she focuses her research on the exciting and evolving field of digital narrative study. She is especially interested in the expanding presence of video games as a compelling source of narrative, one that is necessarily participatory by nature. Further still, video games have long merited the right to be considered as important cultural artifacts and her study and analysis of their stories focuses especially on their historical, political, and social relevance. She also maintains her love of the written word and loves to explore how storytelling, in all of its forms, reveals important aspects of our shared humanity. Most of all, she loves her time in the classroom, sharing ideas and thoughts with students from all backgrounds. Her classes feature the close and careful study of storytelling in both written and digital forms. She is the author of three books, Storytelling in Video Games: The Art of the Digital Narrative, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Trauma, and History in Metal Gear Solid V, and A Cure for Toxic Masculinity: Male Bonding and Friendship in Final Fantasy XV as well as numerous articles.

 

Bunker Diplomacy: An Arab-American in the U.S. Foreign Service

by Nabeel Khoury

Purchase

Nabeel Khoury has written a remarkably cogent memoir.  He not only details life in the Foreign Service in a highly entertaining and engaging style, but also provides provocative and telling insights into many of the crises in the Middle East…From Egypt, to ‘The Magic Kingdom’ to Iraq, Morocco and Yemen — Dr. Khoury undertook his duties with a flair that was both bold and unique. I only wish that American policy makers would read his chapters on Morocco and Yemen in particular, and benefit from his general policy recommendations – It might induce some humility and second thoughts on some important “lessons learned.”
Mark G. Hambley
Former Ambassador to Qatar and Lebanon 
This is a gripping narrative that fuses two stories in one.  The first is the academic and political journey of a fascinating man standing between two worlds — Beirut and Washington, Arabness and Westerness, the State Department and the Middle East…The second narrative is a story of America itself as a great power casting a long shadow over the Arab world. The bureaucratic battles described as occurring inside different presidential administrations over four decades reveal a foreign policy often caught between conflicting personalities and demands. Major events like the Gulf War, Iraq War, and Arab Spring are trenchantly retold from the perspective of policymakers, diplomats, and intelligence officers. That these two stories come from the same book is reason enough to read it, but that they come from the career of the same individual will make readers never forget it.
Moulay Hicham el-Alaoui
President Hicham Alaoui Foundation
Nabeel Khoury – an accomplished Arab-American diplomat – offers readers a searing personal journey through America’s trials and tribulations in the Middle East.
William J. Burns, President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Former Deputy Secretary of State

After twenty-five years in the Foreign Service, Dr. Nabeel A. Khoury retired from the U.S. Department of State in 2013 with the rank of Minister Counselor. He taught Middle East and US strategy courses at the National Defense University and Northwestern University. In his last overseas posting, Khoury served as deputy chief of mission at the U.S. embassy in Yemen (2004-2007). In 2003, during the Iraq war, he served as Department spokesperson at US Central Command in Doha and in Baghdad.

Follow Nabeel on Twitter @khoury_nabeel

 

 

 

Policy Perspectives from Promising New Scholars in Complexity: Volume III

Dr. Liz Johnson and Dr. Joseph Cochran, Editors

Purchase

The world is getting more complex causing policy problems to seemingly get bigger and become more intractable. Traditional approaches and conventional methodologies alone are no longer adequate to solve policy problems in our interconnected global environment. Promising new scholars in the field of policy and complexity are breaking boundaries and laying the groundwork for innovative perspectives on how to better define policy problems, impacts, attitudes, and solutions. Whether in the field of economics, education, energy, health, human security, or transportation, the selected essays and research in this book demonstrate how essential new thinking and approaches are needed.

These scholars have demonstrated vision, imagination, diligence, passion, and courage for solving problems. Don’t miss how some of the top promising new scholars address problems and add to creating viable solutions to some of the biggest policy issues of our day.

History of the Grand Orient of Italy

Emanuela Locci, Editor

Purchase

The initiative to write this volume comes from the need to fill a bibliographic gap: no book in Masonic literature upon the history of Italian Freemasonry has been edited in English up to now. Thus, it aims to cover this lack and to enter those scholars referring to the English idiom into the history of the most eminent Obedience acting in Italy: the Grand Orient of Italy. The book consists of eight studies, written by young researchers devoted to this topic, and covers a span from the Eighteenth Century to the end of the WWII, tracing through an orderly temporal plot the story, the events and pursuits related to the Grand Orient of Italy.

 

 

 

Geopolitics of Outer Space: Global Security and Development

by Ilayda Aydin

Purchase

Civilization in the twenty-first century is characterized by its technological capacity, which is substantially realized through space technologies. A desire for increased security and rapid development is driving nation-states to engage in an intensifying competition for speed and superiority to better utilize the unique assets of space. This competition, however, is rigorously challenged by the unforgiving physical properties of the space environment such as extreme temperatures and intense fluxes of radiation, as well as by an escalation in nuclear proliferation that could end all life known to human existence. Despite these challenges, humanity is taking eager steps into space—and is taking its various geopolitical rivalries and imperatives along.Does space development further or undermine global security? Can an obsession with security pose an ironically existential threat to humanity in this most fragile yet unforgiving environment it is stepping into? This book analyses the Chinese-American space discourse from the lenses of international relations theory, history and political psychology to explore these questions.

 

Why Thirty-Three?: Searching for Masonic Origins

by S. Brent Morris, PhD, Introduction by Wallace E. Boston, Jr.

Purchase

The papers presented here represent over twenty-five years of publications by S. Brent Morris. They explore his many questions about Freemasonry, usually dealing with origins of the Craft. What “high degrees” were in the United States before 1830? What were the activities in the United States before 1801 of the Order of the Royal Secret, the precursor of the Scottish Rite? How did American grand lodges form as they broke away from England? Who were the Gormogons; how did they get started; what happened to them? Why does the Scottish Rite have thirty-three degrees?A complex organization with a lengthy pedigree like Freemasonry has many basic foundational questions waiting to be answered, and that’s what this book does: answers questions.

S. Brent Morris, 33°, Grand Cross, is Managing Editor of the Scottish Rite Journal, the largest circulation Masonic magazine in the world. He retired after twenty-five years as a mathematician with the federal government and has taught at Duke, Johns Hopkins, and George Washington Universities. He is Past Master of Patmos Lodge No. 70, Ellicott City, Maryland, and Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London; a Fellow and Mackey Scholar of the Scottish Rite Research Society; a Fellow of the Philalethes Society; an honorary Fellow of the Phylaxis Society; founding Editor of Heredom, the transactions of the Scottish Rite Research Society; indexer of Ars Quatuor Coronatorum; and Past Grand Abbot of the Society of Blue Friars. He is the author of Magic Tricks, Card Shuffling, and Dynamic Computer Memories; two U.S. patents; nine technical articles; and is author or editor of over forty books on Freemasonry including Complete Idiot’s Guide to Freemasonry and Is It True What They Say About Freemasonry? (with Arturo de Hoyos).

 

 

 

 

Adirondack Summer, 1969: A Novel

by Alan Robert Proctor

Purchase through Amazon

“In Adirondack Summer, 1969, Alan Proctor has fashioned a marvelous world that invokes nostalgia and realism (and even magical realism) to superb effect. It’s a poignant, playful, intensely imagined book, written with grace and good humor and the kind of sentences all writers ache to produce. Highly recommended, whether you went to summer camp or not.”
—Brian Shawver, author of Aftermath and The Language of Fiction.

“I’m a big believer in good first lines to novels, and Alan Proctor grabs you from the first sentence.”
—Frank Higgins, playwright, author of Black Pearl Sings.

“This jewel of a novel … reminds readers of the vulnerability and gifts of summer …. I fell right into the characters, the setting and the drama ….”
—Denise Low, 2007-2009 Poet Laureate of Kansas, author of Melange Block and Jackalope.

“Alan Proctor’s Adirondack Summer, 1969, is a meditation on grief and loss, told with the verve of a John Irving novel. Proctor’s vivid sense of place makes the novel’s setting—an arts camp in the Adirondacks—a character in its own right. His cast, led by Deidre and Myron Cravitz, weave a gorgeous, often comic, tapestry of their delusions, loves, and dreams. Any reader booking a cabin at Camp Cravitz should prepare to be moved and entertained.”
—Whitney Terrell, author of The Good Lieutenant.