Policy Perspectives from Promising New Scholars in Complexity: Volume III

Dr. Liz Johnson and Dr. Joseph Cochran, Editors

Purchase

The world is getting more complex causing policy problems to seemingly get bigger and become more intractable. Traditional approaches and conventional methodologies alone are no longer adequate to solve policy problems in our interconnected global environment. Promising new scholars in the field of policy and complexity are breaking boundaries and laying the groundwork for innovative perspectives on how to better define policy problems, impacts, attitudes, and solutions. Whether in the field of economics, education, energy, health, human security, or transportation, the selected essays and research in this book demonstrate how essential new thinking and approaches are needed.

These scholars have demonstrated vision, imagination, diligence, passion, and courage for solving problems. Don’t miss how some of the top promising new scholars address problems and add to creating viable solutions to some of the biggest policy issues of our day.

History of the Grand Orient of Italy

Emanuela Locci, Editor

Purchase

The initiative to write this volume comes from the need to fill a bibliographic gap: no book in Masonic literature upon the history of Italian Freemasonry has been edited in English up to now. Thus, it aims to cover this lack and to enter those scholars referring to the English idiom into the history of the most eminent Obedience acting in Italy: the Grand Orient of Italy. The book consists of eight studies, written by young researchers devoted to this topic, and covers a span from the Eighteenth Century to the end of the WWII, tracing through an orderly temporal plot the story, the events and pursuits related to the Grand Orient of Italy.

 

 

 

Geopolitics of Outer Space: Global Security and Development

by Ilayda Aydin

Purchase

Civilization in the twenty-first century is characterized by its technological capacity, which is substantially realized through space technologies. A desire for increased security and rapid development is driving nation-states to engage in an intensifying competition for speed and superiority to better utilize the unique assets of space. This competition, however, is rigorously challenged by the unforgiving physical properties of the space environment such as extreme temperatures and intense fluxes of radiation, as well as by an escalation in nuclear proliferation that could end all life known to human existence. Despite these challenges, humanity is taking eager steps into space—and is taking its various geopolitical rivalries and imperatives along.Does space development further or undermine global security? Can an obsession with security pose an ironically existential threat to humanity in this most fragile yet unforgiving environment it is stepping into? This book analyses the Chinese-American space discourse from the lenses of international relations theory, history and political psychology to explore these questions.

 

Why Thirty-Three?: Searching for Masonic Origins

by S. Brent Morris, PhD, Introduction by Wallace E. Boston, Jr.

Purchase

The papers presented here represent over twenty-five years of publications by S. Brent Morris. They explore his many questions about Freemasonry, usually dealing with origins of the Craft. What “high degrees” were in the United States before 1830? What were the activities in the United States before 1801 of the Order of the Royal Secret, the precursor of the Scottish Rite? How did American grand lodges form as they broke away from England? Who were the Gormogons; how did they get started; what happened to them? Why does the Scottish Rite have thirty-three degrees?A complex organization with a lengthy pedigree like Freemasonry has many basic foundational questions waiting to be answered, and that’s what this book does: answers questions.

S. Brent Morris, 33°, Grand Cross, is Managing Editor of the Scottish Rite Journal, the largest circulation Masonic magazine in the world. He retired after twenty-five years as a mathematician with the federal government and has taught at Duke, Johns Hopkins, and George Washington Universities. He is Past Master of Patmos Lodge No. 70, Ellicott City, Maryland, and Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London; a Fellow and Mackey Scholar of the Scottish Rite Research Society; a Fellow of the Philalethes Society; an honorary Fellow of the Phylaxis Society; founding Editor of Heredom, the transactions of the Scottish Rite Research Society; indexer of Ars Quatuor Coronatorum; and Past Grand Abbot of the Society of Blue Friars. He is the author of Magic Tricks, Card Shuffling, and Dynamic Computer Memories; two U.S. patents; nine technical articles; and is author or editor of over forty books on Freemasonry including Complete Idiot’s Guide to Freemasonry and Is It True What They Say About Freemasonry? (with Arturo de Hoyos).

 

 

 

 

Adirondack Summer, 1969: A Novel

by Alan Robert Proctor

Purchase through Amazon

“In Adirondack Summer, 1969, Alan Proctor has fashioned a marvelous world that invokes nostalgia and realism (and even magical realism) to superb effect. It’s a poignant, playful, intensely imagined book, written with grace and good humor and the kind of sentences all writers ache to produce. Highly recommended, whether you went to summer camp or not.”
—Brian Shawver, author of Aftermath and The Language of Fiction.

“I’m a big believer in good first lines to novels, and Alan Proctor grabs you from the first sentence.”
—Frank Higgins, playwright, author of Black Pearl Sings.

“This jewel of a novel … reminds readers of the vulnerability and gifts of summer …. I fell right into the characters, the setting and the drama ….”
—Denise Low, 2007-2009 Poet Laureate of Kansas, author of Melange Block and Jackalope.

“Alan Proctor’s Adirondack Summer, 1969, is a meditation on grief and loss, told with the verve of a John Irving novel. Proctor’s vivid sense of place makes the novel’s setting—an arts camp in the Adirondacks—a character in its own right. His cast, led by Deidre and Myron Cravitz, weave a gorgeous, often comic, tapestry of their delusions, loves, and dreams. Any reader booking a cabin at Camp Cravitz should prepare to be moved and entertained.”
—Whitney Terrell, author of The Good Lieutenant.

 

 

The Death Penalty in the Caribbean: Perspectives from the Police

Editor, Wendell C. Wallace PhD

Purchase through Amazon 

“The Death Penalty in the Caribbean is a novel, thought-provoking and timely contribution to the contentious debate of the Death Penalty in the Anglophone Caribbean. This book is directed at policy makers, law enforcement practitioners and scholars, and is a must read for students of criminology, international relations, political science and security studies for the light it sheds on this complex matter.”
—Dr. Suzette A. Haughton, senior lecturer of international relations and security studies, Department of Government, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus.

“The Death Penalty in the Caribbean is a clarion call to police leaders and police officers to share their views on the viability of the death penalty as a crime control mechanism for the Caribbean. The book presents cogent and reasoned discussions which are worthy of stimulating future discourse among policy makers, police leaders and academics and is very encouraging for the development of a Caribbean Jurisprudence.”
—Stephen Williams, Commissioner of Police, Trinidad and Tobago Police Service.

Many individuals have yearned to hear the voices of the often voiceless police leaders in the Caribbean. With this in mind, two controversial topics, policing and the death penalty, are skillfully interwoven into one book in order to respond to this lacuna in the region. The book carries you through a disparate range of emotions, thoughts, frustrations, successes and views as espoused by police leaders throughout the Caribbean. The book is a riveting read that will quench readers’ thirst for knowledge on the death penalty and policing as viewed through the lens of police practitioners. This book is a must read for students of criminology, law, police sciences as well as man on the street and is a great opportunity to listen to the voices of Caribbean police leaders as they bare it all for the readers. If you are interested in understanding the challenges faced by police officers, crime prevention and reduction strategies and the efficacy of the death penalty in the Caribbean, then this is a book for you.

Dr. Wendell C. Wallace is a Criminologist, Barrister and a Certified Mediator who also has over 15 years of progressive policing experience. These unique qualifications have placed him in a prime position to deliberate on the myriad of crime related issues such as the Death Penalty, obstacles to policing and crime prevention and reduction strategies that confront Caribbean countries and their police departments.

 

Stamped: An Anti-Travel Novel

by Kawika Guillermo

Buy it in printfor Kindle

Exasperated by the small-minded tyranny of his hometown, Skyler Faralan travels to Southeast Asia with $500 and a death wish. After months of wandering, he crosses paths with other dejected travelers: Sophea, a short-fused NGO worker; Arthur, a brazen expat abandoned by his wife and son; and Winston, a defiant intellectual exile. Bound by pleasure-fueled self-destruction, the group flounders from one Asian city to another, confronting the mixture of grief, betrayal, and discrimination that caused them to travel in the first place.

“Guillermo tells the stories of American expatriates seeking to lose or remake themselves in the far-flung corners of Asia. His narrative voice—steady, visual, and evocative—is complemented by his keen ear for dialogue.”
—Peter Bacho, author of Cebu and winner of the American Book Award

“Guillermo’s novel teaches the reader how to engage the world and reveals the very best about being a traveler rather than a tourist. We follow not only a vivid visual adventure across Asia, but also a linguistic journey into understanding new language and a definition of ‘we’ that is inclusive and empowering and revealing.”
—Shawn Hsu Wong, author of Homebase and American Knees

Kawika Guillermo moves and writes throughout Asia and North America, usually embarking from his station in Hong Kong. This is his first novel.