The Art of the Exposition: Personal Impressions of the Architecture, Sculpture, Mural Decorations, Color Scheme & Other Aesthetic Aspects of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition

by Eugen Neuhaus

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Eugen Neuhaus was born on August 18, 1879, in Germany. He moved to the United States in 1904, ultimately becoming a US citizen in 1911. He began teaching various art and design classes at colleges in northern California, including the University of California. He lectured at numerous colleges, including internationally over the years, before ultimately retiring from the University of California in 1949, at the age of 70. He died at the age of 84 in 1963, in Berkeley.

One of the highlights of Neuhaus’ career was his assistance in developing the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, held in San Francisco during 1915. This work, The Art of the Exposition, is derived from lectures he gave to the public about its design and development, which were very well received. The Panama-Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco, 1915 was an event celebrating the development of the Panama Canal. Many beautiful pieces of architecture were developed for the Exposition, perhaps the most notable being the Palace of Fine Arts. A number of members of the National Sculpture Society exhibited, and this new edition is dedicated to their memory.

 

 

The Jesters: A Simple Story in Four Acts of Verse from the French of Miguel Zamacois

by John N. Raphael

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Miguel Louis Pascal Zamacoïs was born on September 8, 1866 into a family of artists. He himself became a writer of many types, including journalism, writing for the paper, Je suis partout; multiple novels; operas and numerous other pieces for the theater, including Les Bouffons; and poetry, such as L’Arche de Noé. For his work, he received the Prix de poésie de l’Académie française in 1926. He lived until March 20, 1955, and was buried in Paris.

This new edition is dedicated to Pierre Mollier, scholar and friend.

 

 

The Masonic Genius of Robert Burns: An Address Delivered in Lodge “Quatuor Coronati,” 2076, 4th March, 1892

by Bro. Benjamin Ward Richardson

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and
availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards
“more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

Robert Burns was coronated the Poet Laureate of Freemasonry in a Scottish lodge ceremony and his Masonic odes are still today recited with gusto in lodge rooms.

This new edition is dedicated to Robert Cooper, Grand Librarian of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, and helpmate to many scholars.

 

Some African Highways: A Journey of Two American Women to Uganda and the Transvaal

by Caroline Kirkland, Introduction by Lieutenant-General Baden-Powell

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Much of this work originally appeared in the Chicago Tribune. Caroline Kirkland’s goal was to encourage other Americans, particularly women, to make the voyage into Uganda and parts of East Africa. Kirkland described her journey as “made with entire safety and great comfort…where else can you look out from railway carriage windows and see zebras, gnus, giraffes, hyneas, and even lions as you steam through a land?” While this work is greatly valuable as a travelogue by a female traveler, it is not unbound from the social mores of the time. For example, Kirkland also describes Uganda as for,

“the lover of strong contrasts, of high lights and black shadows, of wonderful scenery, of great spaces, of all that is new and free and sitting, I recommend a trip to this dark, mysterious, violent and enchanting country. We two women only touched the surface of it, but we were ever conscious of much we could not see, nor hear, nor formulate, but which exists in a land teeming with fierce and savage life.”

Kirkland took the journey with her mother, and an Italian maid, Nannina, who was to work for Kirkland’s sister residing in Central Africa. Her work includes a historical sketch, and numerous photographs.

 

Pirates with a Foreword and Sundry Decorations

by Daniel Defoe, Introduction by C. Lovat Fraser

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Daniel Defoe has a very long history of readership. Thought to have been born on September 13, 1660 as Daniel Foe, he lived until April 24, 1731. He was many things, including a writer, trader, political thinker and spy. He wrote a great deal on politics, crime, economics and business, as well as many fiction books, including classics such as Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders. Tracing down Defoe’s many works can be a challenge since he used dozens of pennames.

He was often in business, but rarely solvent. He was fortunate to have married Mary Tuffley, receiving a large dowry, which temporarily bailed him out of financial straits. Together, the pair created eight children together. Life was difficult for Mary as Defoe often found himself in jail, and when not, he was often traveling throughout Europe. As the rule of England was in upheaval, Defoe’s political pamphlets often tested the tempers of the rulers, and Defoe was often flung into prison or pressed into spying. If it wasn’t political issues, Defoe was often in or hiding from debtors’ prison.

Claud Lovat Fraser was an English artist. He was born on May 15, 1890, and died at the young age of 31 on June 18, 1921. He served during World War I, and was injured by a gas attack which harmed his lungs. Due to the damage to his physical and mental health, he was discharged. He never stopped pursing his love of art, even drawing and painting while on the battlefield. After his discharge, Fraser married Grace Inez Crawford, and together they had a child. He worked for various stationary and bookshops making stationary designs, as well as theater companies. He died from a combination of illnesses and a failed operation.

 

Lectures on Sculpture: On the Death of Thomas Banks, Antonio Conova, and John Flaxman

by John Flaxman R.A., Contributions by Sir Richard Westmacott R.A.

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John Flaxman (1755-1826) was an extraordinarily popular British sculptor, illustrator, and teacher. He earned his start by creating funerary monuments. Despite moving on to creating different sculpture forms and art in different media, he was still influenced by his early form of bas-reliefs and incorporated it into other projects. Having married an intelligent, hard working wife, Anne Denman, the pair enjoyed a lot of success and support of one another. Together they enjoyed many years in Rome, with Flaxman illustrating and sculpting a great deal. after nearly eight years, they returned to England, where Flaxman was made an Associate of the Royal Academy, where he exhibited for a few years before he was made a full Academician, where he went on to teach.

Flaxman remains an extremely influential figure. University College London has much of Flaxman’s work in terms of writings, drawings, and plasters and the famed Flaxman Gallery. Sadly, some of it was damaged during air raids of World War II.

 

Select Passages from Ancient Writers: Illustrative of the History of Greek Sculpture

by H. Stuart Jones M.A.

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Henry Stuart Jones (1867-1939) was a British scholar who worked at University of Oxford, Trinity College, and University College of Wales at Aberystwyth. He did quite well in Wales, as he learned Welsh, and served on a number of councils, such as the National Library of Wales. He was a prolific author and primarily interested in ancient Roman and Greek art and history. His other publications included Classical Rome (1910), Fresh Light on Roman Bureaucracy (1920), and The Roman Empire 29 BC–476 AD (1909).