A Frenchman in the Gold Rush: The Journal of Ernest De Massey, Argonaut of 1849

by Ernest De Massey, Translated by Marguerite Eyer Wilbur

Purchase through CreateSpace

Ernest De Massey arrived in the United States in 1849. He went to San Francisco, and became a retailer, since he had the capital and came from some wealth. However, the lure of the Gold Rush was too much for him, so he decided to close his shop and follow many of his customers into the mountains in hopes of striking it rich. He tried prospecting in multiple areas, including Klamath River. Like many, he left with empty pockets and dashed dreams, though he was very fortunate to have kept his health. Prospecting was very arduous, and frequently dangerous. De Massey only lasted five months before giving up, after falling seriously ill. He decided to return to San Francisco and the somewhat more stable life of an entrepreneur. But in 1857 he returned to Europe. De Massey’s fascinating first hand account illustrates how the Gold Rush mesmerized so many.

 

Advertisements

Ritual Order of the Rainbow for Girls

by W. Mark Sexson

Purchase through CreateSpace

Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. It deals with an order for girls and young women that has become worldwide.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable. Included are titles about youth movements such as Rainbow, DeMolay, and Job’s Daughters.

 

Bees in Amber: A Little Book of Thoughtful Verse

by John Oxenham

Purchase through Amazon  Purchase through CreateSpace

So many writers work hard, yet unsuccessfully reach a mass audience. In a few cases, they are pleasantly surprised. William Arthur Dunkerley (1852-1941) could count himself among the fortunate. Born in 1852 in England, Dunkerley became a publisher. However, he also wanted to become a writer. He wrote this small book of prose, which is heavily influenced by his religious beliefs, as, among other professions, he was a deacon and teacher at the Ealing Congregational Church. It struck a chord with so many readers that it went on to sell thousands of copies and become a Victorian bestseller. Interestingly, though Dunkerley wrote prose under his own name, he used the nom de plume, John Oxenham, for his poetry. He was a prolific writer as well as a journalist, especially during World War I, and also a novelist and poet. In addition to all this writing and religious service, Dunkerley was a politician and served as a mayor of Worthing in Sussex.

 

 

Iceland: Horseback Tours in Saga Land

by W. S. C. Russell

Purchase through Amazon  Purchase through CreateSpace

Waterman Spaulding Chapman Russell, wrote under the much abbreviated name, W. S. C. Russell (1871-1918). Though a many year resident of New Hampshire, he enjoyed traveling, particularly to Iceland. He was fascinated with the country, its fire and ice and sagas, and surprised by the scant ethnographic, geological, or other studies of it. He took it upon himself to study the area, and wrote multiple books on Iceland, including Askja, A Volcano in the Interior of Iceland (1917). Russell spent a great deal of time in Iceland, living there for a while, and because of this, he felt his accounts of the region and its people were superior. He energetically encouraged others to visit, study and learn more about what he felt was one of the most fascinating places in the world.

 

A Century of French Fiction: Balzac, Flaubert, Stendhal and More

by Benjamin W. Wells PhD

Purchase through Amazon  Purchase through CreateSpace

Benjamin Wells takes on an epic task: to catalog 115 authors, and 688 pieces of writing. Rather than focus on the popularity of the piece or the author, Wells groups them together by place or birth, historical context, and writing style, choosing to spend the most time on specific examples of writing he finds are most unique and excellent. Wells focuses on Stendhal, Balzac, Zola, and de Maupassant, and offers a historical contextualization of their writings and their impact on society.

 

 

Swiss Freemasonry: A Historical Sketch with Organization, Principles and Constitution

by Dr. Bernard Perrelet

Purchase through Amazon  Purchase through CreateSpace

Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

 

The Little Confectioner: 19th Century Candy and Cake

by H. Hueg

Purchase through Amazon  Purchase through CreateSpace

Herman Hueg wrote four books on confections and baking, including Ornamental Confectionery and the Art of Baking in All its Branches (1905), and Book of Designs for Bakers and Confectioners (1896). Hueg was a renounced baker and confectioner. He expanded his reach by moving into selling tools and other implements for bakers to help replicate the skilled work, such as molds and stencils. This approach is taken in this volume, which begins with a series of recipes for sugar spinning, caramels, nut bars, taffy, ice cream, bonbons, syrups and more. The latter portion of the book has several pages dedicated to interesting baking implements, which are nicely illustrated.