The Durable Satisfactions of Life

by Charles William Eliot

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Born into a wealthy Boston family, Eliot was fortunate enough to concentrate on his studies and have the ability to attend Boston Latin School, and then later graduate from Harvard University in 1853. However, after the Panic of 1857, Eliot’s family lost much of its wealth. Eliot decided to visit various schools across Europe and study educational systems after being passed over for a professorship.After close to two years abroad, Eliot returned home and enjoyed an appointment at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Eliot remained interested in improving the educational system in the US, which was not seen as offering particularly useful knowledge to an industrializing country. His sentiments were shared by much of the public, and he wrote a well-received article in The Atlantic Monthly about his visions for a reformed educational system. In 1969, after the publication of the article, Eliot would be selected as the president of Harvard.

Eliot, despite trying to remove football from the school, was a popular president, enough so to have served 40 years. He modernized the curriculum, introduced standardized exams, expanded the facilities, and changed the way educational institutions funded themselves. The Durable Satisfactions of Life is a collection of essays and addresses given by Eliot which often reflect on his ethical and religious views of life.

This new edition is dedicated to Arthur Shurcliff.

 

 

 

Nietzsche in Outline & Aphorism

by A. R. Orage

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Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a philosopher, a poet, and a scholar. Unfortunately, he suffered from poor health, which caused him to resign from his position as the Chair of Classical Philology, which he held at the age of 24. At 44, he was so ill that his mother, and then his sister had to care for him until his death at the page of 55. Nietzsche wrote on numerous subjects, but is commonly associated with nihilism, critiques of Christian morality, and his strong opposition to anti-Semitism and nationalism. There was a brief time when his sister reworked his manuscripts to favor Nazi ideology, but the correct manuscripts were uncovered.Alfred Richard Orage was born in January 1873 and lived until November 1934. He was a scholar, writer, teacher, political organizer, publisher, and socialist.This is a reprint work.

 

 

 

 

The Quintessence Of Nietzsche

by J. M. Kennedy

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Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) has had a profound impact on our way of life. Among other things, he was a philosopher, a poet, and a scholar. Unfortunately, he suffered from poor health, which caused him to resign from his position as the Chair of Classical Philology, which he held at the age of 24. At 44, he was so ill that his mother, and then his sister had to care for him until his death at the page of 55. Nietzsche wrote on numerous subjects, but is commonly associated with nihilism, critiques of Christian morality, and his strong opposition to anti-Semitism and nationalism. There was a brief time when his sister reworked his manuscripts to favor Nazi ideology, but the correct manuscripts were uncovered. Many scholars have written about Nietzsche.

J. M. Kennedy was the pen name for John McFarland, who wrote extensively on Nietzsche. He also wrote on education, philology and war.

This new edition is dedicated to Daniel Gutierrez Sandoval and Emma Norman, who have had different views of Nietzsche.

Please note that this is a reprint of the original version, and has a few small blemishes.

 

Prophets of Dissent: Essays on Maeterlinck, Strindberg, Nietzsche and Tolstoy

by Otto Heller

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Otto Heller pulls together four unique voices because he argues that they are radicals who put forth powerful theories for living. In his own words, Heller states:

However, the gathering together of Maeterlinck, Nietzsche, Strindberg, and Tolstoy under the hospitality of a common book-cover permits of a supplementary explanation on the ground of a certain fundamental likeness far stronger than their only too obvious diversities. They are, one and all, radicals in thought, and, with differing strength of intention, reformers of society, inasmuch as their speculations and aspirations are relevant to practical problems of living. And yet what gives them such a durable hold on our attention is not their particular apostolate, but the fact that their artistic impulses ascend from the subliminal regions of the inner life, and that their work somehow brings one into touch with the hidden springs of human action and human fate. This means, in effect, that all of them are mystics by original cast of mind and that notwithstanding any difference, however apparently violent, of views and theories, they follow the same introspective path towards the recognition and interpretation of the law of life. From widely separated ethical premises they thus arrive at an essentially uniform appraisal of personal happiness as a function of living.

Otto Heller was born on July 1863, and was known for being a writer and an academic, until his passing on July 29, 1941. His life spanned the Atlantic Ocean. He attended the University of Prague, among a handful of other European schools because coming to the United States in 1883. He earned his PhD from the University of Chicago in 1890. His focus was on European languages and literature. He taught at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, but his final post would be at Washington University. Eventually, he came the dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

 

The Freudian Wish and its Place in Ethics

by Edwin B. Holt

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Edwin B. Holt was born in 1873 in Massachusetts. He earned a PhD from Harvard in 1901, and went on to become an esteemed professor there. He was a psychologist who was also well-read in philosophy. He retired early to write, but then he began teaching for another decade at Princeton University. He wrote a great deal, and became known for his research in developing cognitive behaviorism. In this work, The Freudian Wish and its Place, Holt examines how ‘the wish’ can help explain people’s motivations for their actions. Some of his ideas in this work were expanded upon by Edward C. Tollman, one of Holt’s students, as purposeful behaviorism. Holt passed away in 1946 after many decades of teaching and writing.

 

Nietzsche: Who He Was and What He Stood For

by M. A. Mugge PhD, Edited by E. Haldeman-Julius

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Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) has had a profound impact on our way of life. Among other things, he was a philosopher, a poet, and a scholar. Unfortunately, he suffered from poor health, which caused him to resign from his position as the Chair of Classical Philology at Basel, which he held at the age of 24. At 44, he was so ill that his mother, and then his sister, had to care for him until his death at the age of 55.

Nietzsche is commonly associated with nihilism, critiques of Christian morality, and his strong opposition to anti-Semitism, and nationalism.
There was a brief time when his sister reworked his manuscripts to favor Nazi ideology, but the correct manuscripts were uncovered.

Many scholars have written about Nietzsche. M. A. Mugge wrote a great deal about philosophy, especially Greek thinkers. This work offers a biography of Nietzsche, and includes Mugge’s views on his writings and life.

 

A Different Dimension: Reflections on the History of Transpersonal Thought

by Mark B. Ryan

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A Different Dimension traces the historical development of an expanded, transpersonal view of consciousness—a view that sees the human mind as reaching beyond individual, personal consciousness into realms that we call “spiritual.” It provides a rich and vital discussion of some of the most fundamental questions of our lives: questions about the nature and capacities of the human mind, and its relation to ultimate realities.

While scientifically informed, transpersonal thought challenges common assumptions of our dominant, materialistic intellectual consensus, which sees all consciousness as a product of brain function. While sympathetic to mystical experience, it seldom endorses mainstream systems of religious belief; rather, it provides intellectual substance to the trend referred to as Spiritual But Not Religious.

Focusing on key figures and their seminal ideas, Mark Ryan presents a clear and graceful account of this current in psychology, from before the discovery of the unconscious in the late 19th century, through the emergence of transpersonal psychology as an organized field in the late 1960s, to its reverberations in our contemporary world.

For 22 years, Mark Ryan taught American Studies and History at Yale University, where he was the long-term Dean of Jonathan Edwards College. Subsequently, he was Titular IV Professor of International Relations and History at the Universidad de las Américas, Puebla in Mexico, where he also served as Dean of the Colleges and Director of the graduate program in United States Studies. For 14 years a Trustee of Naropa University, he is certified as a practitioner of Holotropic Breathwork. Currently he teaches at the C.G. Jung Educational Center of Houston, the Wisdom School of Graduate Studies of Ubiquity University, and other venues.

 

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington Vol. VI

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid the foundations for advances iBookCoverImagevin magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at the Cosmos Club, in whose founding the Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when the Cosmos was founded, there was fear that the Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all the present members of the Philosophical were invited to join as founding members of the Cosmos.

This 1881 volume demonstrates the extraordinary history of the Society. Noting that more than 200 consecutive meetings had been held, it includes an address by E.M. Gallaudet on deafness, by John Wesley Powell on the limits to the use of data, and no less than two addresses by Alexander Graham Bell. No other society in Washington has maintained such high standards for so many years. Its Friday night gatherings have survived the turbulence of war and depression and retain their relevance: the 2234th meeting in spring of 2014 presented the Nobel laureate Craig Mello.

The Speculative Art of Alchemy: A Text Book on the Art of Self-Regeneration

by A. S. Raleigh

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Of The Speculative Art of Alchemy, Raleigh wrote, “This Course of Lessons constitutes the Official Text Book of the Hermetic Brotherhood of Atlantis for the study of the Speculative Art of Alchemy, they contain as much of the Sacred Art as will ever be given to the general public at any time…In this training there are three stages of Discipleship. Let it be borne in mind that the Hermetic Discipleship is in reality a course of training. Never make the mistake of assuming that it is merely a theory that you have undertaken to study.”alchemy2

Dr. A. S. Raleigh wrote numerous books on this and similar fields, as he was interested in exploring and encouraging others to study the interconnectedness of spirit, geometry, science, nature and religion. His significant works including Scientifica Hermetica: An Introduction to the Science of Alchemy, Hermetic Fundamentals Revealed, Occult Geometry and Philosophia Hermetica.

This edition is dedicated to John Belton, learned scholar-student of the bypaths and byways of  the arcane past.

Alchemy: Ancient and Modern: Meaning, Theory and Lies of Alchemists Across the Ages

by H. Stanley Redgrove

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According to the author, alchemy was the belief that “all the metals (and, indeed, all forms of matter) are one in origin, and are produced by an evolutionary process. The Soul of them all is one and the same; it is only the Soul that is permanent…” Redgrove offers a detailed account of alchemy’s controversial history, treating both the theoretical and physical approaches to the field. Alcalchemy1hemy: Ancient and Modern has long been viewed as a significant introductory text to the subject.

Herbert Stanley Redgrove (1887-1943) wrote several texts on similar topics, including A Mathematical Theory of Spirit, Bygone Beliefs and Purpose and Transcendentalism. He was a chemist and a founder of the Alchemical Society in London.


This edition is dedicated to Adam Kendall, in his distinctive way an authority on the mysteries of the past.

The Design of Life: Development from a Human Perspective

by Dr. Norman S. Rose PhD

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“The spiral is the pattern of all things in the universe that move and grow.”
With those words, Dr. John Waskom would take his audience through time and space, through cosmos and microcosm, through human anatomy, and finally through the stages of our lives. And it all fit together with an elegance that was both surprising and comforting. John Waskom could indeed sense and demonstrate the “magic of design” as it expressed through numbers, patterns of nature, and human proportions.

But then he turned to deeper matters. “Do you suppose…?” he would begin to ask, over and over. And now he would lead his audience through speculations on child-rearing and education: What would it mean to raise and educate children in a way that respected what was inherent in their natural design? What would it mean to give young people experiences rather than answering their questions? What would it mean to be parents and teachers who were more concerned with observing patterns than with following habit and tradition?


Norman Rose was in such an audience, and it inspired him to make natural human development his life work. This book is a culmination of that work, beginning with the ideas of his mentor and expanding them into a unified view of the entire human lifespan – and the parental, educational, and therapeutic approaches that could make natural development a reality.

Dr. Rose has taught at all levels, from early elementary grades through university teacher preparation programs. He is also a gardener, hiker, and music composer with several published albums.

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington Vol. V

by Philosophical Society of Washington

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid the foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at the Cosmos Club, in whose founding the Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when the Cosmos was founded, there was fear that the Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all the present members of the Philosophical were invited to join as founding members of the Cosmos.

Socrates: An Oration

by Thomas Starr KingBookCoverImage-2

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Boston fancied itself the Athens of America when Thomas Starr King delivered his celebrated lecture on Socrates to rapt audiences. On January 29th, 1849, he wrote his friend Randolph Ryer: The first of the week I was engaged in retouching my lecture (before the Mercantile Library Association)… Such a house you never saw. It was jammed and crammed, the largest of the season, except when Webster spoke. Every seat was filled, two hundred extra ones were provided, and then at least a hundred people stood around the doors. It took with critics and people, the audience were amazingly still, except when they applauded, which was not seldom.

The Torch of Liberty

by Frederic Arnold Kummer, Illustrated by Kreigh Collins

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The Torch of Liberty features several Greek stories highlighting the development of democracy. The illustrations in this volume are by Kreigh Collins (1908-1974) who created the comic strip hero Kevin the Bold, and whose papers are collected by the library of Syracuse University.

Frederic Arnold Kummer (1873-1943) was the son of a German emigrant who fought in the Civil War and helped found Kummer & Becker, the Baltimore banking firm who were agents for the North German Lloyd Steamship Line.

In he wrote The Film of Fear, the earliest known novel with a motion picture theme. Three years later he wrote the lyrics for “My Golden Girl” a popular Broadway comedy with music by Victor Herbert. Kummer’s other titles included The Green God (1911, Ladies in Hades: A Story of Hell’s Smart Set (1928) and Gentlemen in Hades: The Story of a Damned Debutante (1930). His first wife, Clare Rodman Beecher (1873-1958) was a composer and songwriter who worked with Sigmund Romberg and Jerome Kern. His son by his second wife, Marjorie McLean—Frederic Arnold Kummer Jr.—became a science fiction writer.

The collaboration of Kummer and Collins was well reviewed when it first appeared: “There have been a number of books on somewhat similar pattern – a collection of short stories designed to highlight periods in world history when the significance of freedom came to the fore. Janet Marsh’s Don’t Tread on Me, is an example. But this, though inevitably there is some overlapping, is far and away the best one that has been done. One traces the different aspects under which democracy has appeared from early Greeks to modern America, Good stories all.”

 

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington Vol. IV

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid the foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at the Cosmos Club, in whose founding the Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when the Cosmos was founded, there was fear that the Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all the present members of the Philosophical were invited to join as founding members of the Cosmos.

This 1881 volume demonstrates the extraordinary history of the Society. Noting that more than 200 consecutive meetings had been held, it includes an address by E.M. Gallaudet on deafness, by John Wesley Powell on the limits to the use of data, and no less than two addresses by Alexander Graham Bell. No other society in Washington has maintained such high standards for so many years. Its Friday night gatherings have survived the turbulence of war and depression and retain their relevance: the 2234th meeting in spring of 2014 presented the Nobel laureate Craig Mello.

Chemical Strategy in Peace and War


by Victor Lefebure

Victor Lefebure (1891-1947) earned his bachelor’s at University College London in 1911 and began a research and teaching career at Wye College before being called to the colors in the 3rd Essex Regiment in 1915.  He was seconded to the Special Brigade of the Royal Engineers that was developing chemical warfare to be use against the Germans. He worked with the French forces and they carried out a number of successful attacks, notably at Nieuport on October 5, 19Riddle of the Rhine COVER FRONT ONLY16. After the war he became a successful businessman and the inventor of a number of building materials. This book about chemical warfare became basic to the subject’s history.

But the gas attacks troubled him and in 1931 he wrote Scientific Disarmament, with introductions by such luminaries at Lloyd George and H.G. Wells. There he wrote, “Is it illogical or disloyal for technical men who have fostered armament in a previous national emergency, and might do so again, to take the initiative in the direction of disarmament? These questions have inevitably pursued me in writing this book, for the old loyalty to organisations and friends of the War must remain to the end. I can only say that it must be the first objective of any sane person who has seen war, to try to prevent the kind of catastrophe which engulfed the world in 1914. The deciding factor is surely this, the obligation to another generation which might again be sacrificed. If sane disarmament can assist, and if armament knowledge is an essential part, then this obligation falls upon those who possess it. Their contribution is essential, and it is because the scruples which pursued me in breaking new ground will also pursue them that I make these comments.”

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An Early Theosophical Controversy

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By C. Jinarajadasa

The An Early Theosophical Controversy COVER FRONT ONLYfamous theosophist leader H.P. Blavatsky (1831-1891) claimed to be in contact with the Adepts, the mysterious Tibetan prophets and seers whose teachings inspired the early Theosophical movement.  Whether they were real masters or inspired metaphors that Mme. Blavatsky created is a question that has never been satisfactorily settled, and these original papers are part of the continuing controversy.

Homeopathy: B.F. Bittinger’s Historical Sketch of Washington’s Hahnemann Monument 

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One oHomeopathy COVER FRONT ONLYf the more imposing monuments in Washington is not to a general or to a congressman but to a leader in the homeopathic movement. One may wonder whether homeopathic remedies are effective; there is not an iota of proof that the promises the movement makes are ever kept, but homeopathic systems continue to be financed by governments, including India and Britain, and to be patronized by notables such as the British royal family. The monument therefore is one of the capital’s most interesting, if controversial sights.

Earthworms, Horses, and Living Things: William DuPuy’s Our Animal Friends and Foes

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William AtEarthworms, Horses, and Living Things COVER FRONT ONLYherton DuPuy was a well-known naturalist who wrote anecdotally and personally about nature in Animal Friends And Foes, Insect Friends And Foes, The Nation’s Forests, and Plant Friends And Foes.  In another vein he authored Green Kingdom, his account of the life of a forest ranger, and controversially produced Hawaii And Its Race Problem.  He also wrote for Harper’s and had a connection with the Department of the Interior and, less happily, with the military’s chemical warfare projects.

 

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Original Our Animal Friends and Foes cover