Told in the Hills: A Novel

by Marah Ellis Ryan

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Marah Ellis Ryan was born on February 27, 1860 in Pennsylvania. She wrote a great deal, especially under the pen name Ellis Martin. She is most well known for living with Hopi in Arizona. She was an theater actress for five years, but then she went on to focus on writing. She also managed a farm near Fayette Springs in Pennsylvania. Along with Told in the Hills (1891), she also wrote On Love’s Domains (1890) and Squaw Elouise (1892).Told in the Hills was a popular novel that became a motion picture in 1919. The book and film have numerous differences, especially in the ending. It revolves around a relationship between two brothers, the US government, and the Kootenai tribe (Ktunaxa) in Montana. Unfortunately, although Ryan was often billed as an expert on Indigenous Americans, she was not familiar with Ktunaxa language, and instead substituted the Chinook language, which she was knowledgeable of. Ktunaxa is a unique language in that it is a language isolate, not like any other language in the world.

 

 

 

The Jesters: A Simple Story in Four Acts of Verse from the French of Miguel Zamacois

by John N. Raphael

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Miguel Louis Pascal Zamacoïs was born on September 8, 1866 into a family of artists. He himself became a writer of many types, including journalism, writing for the paper, Je suis partout; multiple novels; operas and numerous other pieces for the theater, including Les Bouffons; and poetry, such as L’Arche de Noé. For his work, he received the Prix de poésie de l’Académie française in 1926. He lived until March 20, 1955, and was buried in Paris.

This new edition is dedicated to Pierre Mollier, scholar and friend.

 

 

In the Great God’s Hair: Translated from the Original Manuscript

by F. W. Bain

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F.W. Bain translated this work from the original Sanskrit, and offered this as an introduction, “The name of the little Indian gable, here presented to the lover of curiosities in an English dress, is ambiguous. We may translate it indifferently, either: The New Moon in the hair of the God of Gods, or else, She That Reduces the Pride of Gods, Demons, and all the Rest of Creation, that is the Goddess of Beauty and Fortune. To those unfamiliar with the peculiar genius of the Sanskrit language, it might seem singular, that two such different ideas should be expressible by the one and the same word. but it is just in this power of dexterous ambiguity that the beauty of that language lies.”

Francis William Bain was born on April 29, 1863 and lived until March 3, 1940. He enjoyed a wide variety of pursuits in his life, ranging from being an amateur footballer to serving as a professor of history in British India. Yet he considered himself primarily a writer, specializing in fantasy, which he claimed to have translated from Sanskrit. However, these works were not directly taken from Hindu manuscripts, but were rather a mixture of Orientalism and Bain’s interest in fantasy. Although it was revealed that Bain was lying about the origins of such works as In the Great God’s Hair, his readership was unaffected. However, it is important for readers of to know that the views that this work imparts on marriage, love, and religion, are largely those of Bain’s and not a true reflection of Hinduism.

 

The White Morning: A Novel of the Power of the German Woman in Wartime

by Gertrude Atherton

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Born on October 30, 1857, in San Francisco, Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton was fortunate enough to be raised by her grandfather after her parents divorced when she was two. Her grandfather was Stephen Franklin, a relative of Benjamin Franklin, was deeply committed to her education. After completing school, she ended up eloping with her mother’s suitor, George H. B. Atherton, and moved to live with him and his family in Fair Oaks, California. Life was difficult, because of the constricting role of womanhood, Atherton found herself in. Sadly, her husband and son died as a result of two different tragedies.

Left alone to care for their daughter, Muriel, Atherton turned to writing. She quickly gained notoriety after her first book, The Randolphs of Redwood: A Romance was published. Her family was very disappointed because of the nature of the publication, so she traveled to New York and Paris, where her writing began to be embraced. She wrote under psuedonyms, including male ones such as Frank Lin, especially early in her career. She was an extraordinarily prolific writer, writing dozens of books in addition to writing for newspapers and magazines, along with plays and films. She was a feminist, and in this work, The White Morning, Atherton imagines the world as led by women.

 

The Story of Ab: A Tale of the Time of the Cave Man

by Stanley Waterloo

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Stanley Waterloo was a writer of many types of media, both fiction and non-fiction, and of books, essays and newspaper articles. Born in 1846, he showed a great deal of promise. He was to attend West Point, but due to an injury, Waterloo did not. He instead went into journalism after law school did not work out for him. His career in the news was quite successful, as Waterloo worked at numerous news outlets in the midwest, including the St. Louis Chronicle, the Chicago Tribune, and the Missouri Republican. He briefly started his own paper, The Day, in St. Paul, but returned to Chicago.

Towards Waterloo’s middle age, he moved into writing literature. He became extremely successful, particularly in England, with his novel, A Man and A Woman, which was released in 1892. This particular work, The Story of Ab, follows that of a caveman living in the Stone Age. Waterloo released several more novels, until his last one, A Son of the Ages, was released posthumously in 1914. A year before its release, Waterloo died of pneumonia.

This new edition is dedicated to Timothy Knab, longtime student of cultures

 

Adirondack Summer, 1969: A Novel

by Alan Robert Proctor

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“In Adirondack Summer, 1969, Alan Proctor has fashioned a marvelous world that invokes nostalgia and realism (and even magical realism) to superb effect. It’s a poignant, playful, intensely imagined book, written with grace and good humor and the kind of sentences all writers ache to produce. Highly recommended, whether you went to summer camp or not.”
—Brian Shawver, author of Aftermath and The Language of Fiction.

“I’m a big believer in good first lines to novels, and Alan Proctor grabs you from the first sentence.”
—Frank Higgins, playwright, author of Black Pearl Sings.

“This jewel of a novel … reminds readers of the vulnerability and gifts of summer …. I fell right into the characters, the setting and the drama ….”
—Denise Low, 2007-2009 Poet Laureate of Kansas, author of Melange Block and Jackalope.

“Alan Proctor’s Adirondack Summer, 1969, is a meditation on grief and loss, told with the verve of a John Irving novel. Proctor’s vivid sense of place makes the novel’s setting—an arts camp in the Adirondacks—a character in its own right. His cast, led by Deidre and Myron Cravitz, weave a gorgeous, often comic, tapestry of their delusions, loves, and dreams. Any reader booking a cabin at Camp Cravitz should prepare to be moved and entertained.”
—Whitney Terrell, author of The Good Lieutenant.

 

 

Shakespeare Problems: Shakespeare’s Fight with the Pirates and the Problems of the Transmission of his Text

by Alfred W. Pollard

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Alfred William Pollard, 1859-1944, was a prolific writer who specialized in literary history. He became well known for elevating the study of Shakespeare, through encouraging rigorous examination, study, and sourcing of material. As a distinguished bibliographer, Pollard rose to be Keeper of the British Museum. Additionally, he served as a Professor at the University of London, teaching English Bibliography. While he worked with numerous scholars on various problems in literature, Shakespeare was closest to his heart and he wrote a great deal about him, including Shakespeare Folios and Quartos: A Study in the Bibliography of Shakespeare’s Plays, 1909; The Foundations of Shakespeare’s Text, 1923; and A Census of Shakespeare’s Plays in Quarto (with Henrietta C. Bartlett), 1939.