It Can Happen Here: A Novel Look Backward

by Max J. Skidmore

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It Can Happen Here is set in the near future following the term of a rogue president. Its protagonist has kept a detailed journal of American politics of the period. He responds to numerous requests from family and friends for descriptive analyses of the 2020 elections and the resulting first year of the new administration. Drawing from the journal, he produces an unconventionally forthright study drawing upon fact and common sense.

Like his protagonist, author Max J. Skidmore has a background well suited for the task. Throughout a long life, he migrated far from his youthful extreme conservatism. His Ph.D. in American Studies enriched his views, as did living abroad. He has been a professor and dean at two American universities, and was the founding head of a political science department at another. He was CEO of a large library and research centre in India. He was senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong. He has published widely, and was founding editor of a peer-reviewed academic quarterly. Never an ivory tower academician, he earned a pilot’s license, and has long practiced martial arts (holding several advanced black belts). He has produced It Can Happen Here as the final part of a trilogy of sorts, along with Unworkable Conservatism, 2017, and The Common Sense Manifesto, 2020. Each of these approached America’s politics from a different point of view. It Can Happen Here is his first application of fiction to complete the truth of the whole.

The Garden at Rose Brake: Garden Writings of Danske Dandridge

Collected and Introduced by Justin McHenry

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Caroline “Danske” Dandridge (1854-1914) was a prominent West Virginian poet and historian of her generation. In numerous articles published in the leading gardening magazines of the time, Dandridge brought readers to her country estate on the outskirts of Shepherdstown, West Virginia. A place she called Rose Brake. The Garden at Rose Brake is the first collection of Danske Dandridge’s garden writings. These articles provide delicate and sumptuous descriptions of Rose Brake’s gardening delights and offer a glimpse into the life of one of West Virginia’s most acclaimed writers.

Justin McHenry is a writer and historian, and the archivist for American Public University System.

The Black Tortoise: Being the Strange Story of Old Frick’s Diamond

by Frederick Viller

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Frederick Viller is the nom de plume of Christian Herman Sparre, a Norwegian Commanding Admiral and a member of Parliament. Sparre was born on July 30, 1859 in Norway to a prominent physician father, who also was a member of Parliament. Sparre was a graduate of both the Norwegian Naval Academy and the Norwegian Military Academy. He went on to a distinguished military career, all while serving as a politician, first serving on the Council of State Division in 1900, later being elected to the Norwegian Parliament in 1913.

Sparre also wrote a variety of fiction as well. The Black Tortoise is a detective novel, followed by The Mysterious Ship. The works were translated from the original into English. This particular work was translated by Mrs. H. L. Braekstad.

This new edition is dedicated to Larissa P. Watkins, scholar and librarian extraordinary, guide to Masonry and mystery.

 

The Life And Works Of Charles Lamb: The Essays Of Elia

by Charles Lamb

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Charles Lamb (1775 – 1834) was a popular English author of works for both adults and children. His siblings were fairly spread out in age, so his elder sister Mary, 11 years older, became his closest friend. She taught him to read and would later author books with Charles. Lamb was educated throughout his life, enjoying a lifelong friendship with his first schoolmistress, Mrs. Reynolds. He went on to attend such institutions as Christ’s Hospital, a boarding school. Lamb was considered to be very popular and well-liked, however, he had a speech impediment, and it was this stuttering that kept him out of going onto college. Instead, Lamb worked as a clerk in several offices, eventually remaining with the British East India Company.

Lamb also took care of his sister Mary after she killed her mother in a fit of madness. Rather than allow her to remain imprisoned for life, Lamb worked to ensure she had been cared for in an asylum, and then was allowed to return home and live with Lamb. Despite a few attempts to court women to marriage, he was unsuccessful, and remained a lifelong bachelor. He and his sister enjoyed a fruitful social life, participating in many English salons. Lamb enjoyed success as a writer, particularly with his prose works, and his famous, Essays of Elia series, and the children’s work, Tales from Shakespeare that was written with his sister.

This new edition is dedicated to Peter Dozal, with best wishes for his studies.

 

A Whistling Farmer

by H. W. Randolph

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Henry Wheeler Randolph was born in 1851. Not much is known about his life. However, through this book of his poetry, much can be gleamed from him and the circumstances of his life. His poems touch on lost love, farming, criminal justice, the Civil War, religion and the pleasures found in nature, general advice and of US history.As he states in his poem, “At the Front,”:”Through faith it is we see beyondThe pale of human thought,One glimpse, and, lo! a brilliant dawnForth stands before us wrought”This new edition is dedicated to Judith Rich Lauder.

 

The cover is teal and features light colored outlines of a hand and a long braid. The title, All Flowers Bloom, is in black and the author's name is in red below in a strong font.

All Flowers Bloom

by Kawika Guillermo

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In a cruise ship stateroom, a soul awakens in the afterlife, still dressed in the Roman servant garbs of his previous life.

He can’t remember much, but a silent woman stands out in his memory: his first and only love.

Unable to cope with an eternity without her, he leaps from the ship and back into the depths of the life stream.

Five hundred years later, he awakens again in the same stateroom, alone and fueled with new memories of her.

In his past lives she was a male insurgent, an elderly wise woman, an unruly servant.

For a millennia the pair are tethered together, clashing in love and fear, betraying each other in times of war and famine.

Before memory drives him mad, he vows to rescue her from the stream — even if it takes a thousand lifetimes more.

Published March 20, 2020


“A defiant and tender call for the power of love, across a thousand lifetimes and lands. Guillermo’s imagination is breath-taking, and he shows the power of the written word as at once the most high-fidelity and stylized of mediums.”
—Ken Liu, author of The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories and The Grace of Kings

“Kawika Guillermo has achieved an ambitious feat: to chronicle a memory—and its vast empire of battles and love, constant guises and surprises—that spans over four thousand years through a narrator who, like the beloved, is blessed, or cursed, with hundreds of lives, each rebirth announcing a different milieu, a different role. At its core, All Flowers Bloom is a lover’s discourse on desire, its multiple masks and power to make lovers and strangers, and traitors and rescuers out of us.”
—R. Zamora Linmark, author of Rolling the R’s and Leche

All Flowers Bloom is a beguiling book, with an inventive narrative unlike anything I have encountered before. This is an emotional journey through lifetimes and loves and losses. Kawika Guillermo delivers wonderment and surprise, a complex universe, and an unforgettable cast of characters.”
—Doretta Lau, author of How Does a Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?

 

Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative

by Amy M. Green

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Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative posits that the 2016 film, tied narratively to the video game Final Fantasy XV, merits far more critical attention that it has received. Given that Kingsglaive is both CGI animated and erroneously seen as only a video game tie-in, it has tended to be consistently dismissed by critics. A closer examination of the film reveals a deeply complex narrative, one that contends with the lingering cultural trauma of WWII in Japan, as especially evidenced by images of fire and burning. The film also contends with the plight of refugees and immigrants, both in Japan and around the globe, as recent years have seen a drastic spike in anti-immigrant sentiment. Finally, through the film’s hero and protagonist, Nyx Ulric, Kingsglaive presents a man who is himself suffering from trauma, standing in the present, yet unable to fully imagine a future for himself.

About the author: Amy M. Green received her Ph.D. in literature from UNLV in 2009. She specialized in Shakespeare and 19th century American literature. Today, her work has evolved and she focuses her research on the exciting and evolving field of digital narrative study. She is especially interested in the expanding presence of video games as a compelling source of narrative, one that is necessarily participatory by nature. Further still, video games have long merited the right to be considered as important cultural artifacts and her study and analysis of their stories focuses especially on their historical, political, and social relevance. She also maintains her love of the written word and loves to explore how storytelling, in all of its forms, reveals important aspects of our shared humanity. Most of all, she loves her time in the classroom, sharing ideas and thoughts with students from all backgrounds. Her classes feature the close and careful study of storytelling in both written and digital forms. She is the author of three books, Storytelling in Video Games: The Art of the Digital Narrative, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Trauma, and History in Metal Gear Solid V, and A Cure for Toxic Masculinity: Male Bonding and Friendship in Final Fantasy XV as well as numerous articles.

 

Tales of the Mermaid Tavern

by Alfred Noyes

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The Mermaid Tavern was a real place in London. Among other frequenters, a group called the “Fraternity of Sireniacal Gentlemen”, met monthly. They were famed literary figures of the Elizabethan period, Nov 17, 1558 – Mar 24, 1603. In this work, Noyes writes chapters celebrating these figures, including Shakespeare.

Alfred Noyes (1880-1958) was a prolific writer who was able to move successfully across several genres. Though he began in poetry, he also wrote screenplays, science fiction novels, ballads and short stories. He did a great deal of traveling and lecturing, spending time in his birth country of England as well as the United States, Canada, various points in South America, and eventually returning to the Isle of Wight where he spent his final years. He wrote numerous works, including The Loom of Y ears (1902), a biography, William Morris (1908), Some Aspects of Modern Poetry (1924), The Last Man (1940) and his autobiography, Two Worlds for Memory (1953).

 

 

Contemporaries of Shakespeare

by Algernon Charles Swinburne

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Algernon Charles Swinburne was born on April 5, 1837 in London. Having been born into a wealthy family, he enjoyed extensive education, learned multiple languages, such as French and Italian, and knew them well enough to win awards for writing poetry in those languages. Swinburne did attend college, but did not graduate. Rather, he went on to become a member of intellectual circles that were open to him due to his background, such as the Literary and Philosophical Society in Newcastle upon Tyne, and Lady Pauline Trevelyan’s intellectual circle at Wallington Hall. Swinburne was talented and wrote many critically acclaimed pieces of prose and criticism. He touched on many subjects that were not often written about publicly, such as BSDM and lesbianism.

Swinburne unfortunately battled with ill health throughout his life. His love of drink and algolagnia did not help. He spent time in the French Riviera to reduce his dependency on alcohol. Swinburne created a larger than life persona arguably, and many stories about his exploits circled society. However, Oscar Wilde put a damper on such, stating Swinburne was “a braggart in matters of vice, who had done everything he could to convince his fellow citizens of his homosexuality and bestiality without being in the slightest degree a homosexual or a bestialiser.” By age 42, he ended up in the care of friends, who helped him regain his health. He lived until the age of 72, passing away on April 10, 1909. He wrote enough to fill numerous collections. Archival material on his life can be found at the Leeds University Library.

 

 

 

Jack’s Ward; or, The Boy Guardian

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

Phil the Fiddler: The Story of a Young Street-Musician

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

The Tin Box and What it Contained

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

Brave and Bold, or, The Fortunes of Robert Rushton

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

Bound to Rise, or, Up the Ladder

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

The Image and Other Plays

by Lady Gregory

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Isabella Augusta, who went as Lady Gregory, was a famed Irish dramatist. Deeply involved in all things theater, including being a theater owner. She primarily was a writer, and received much accolades for her work, later being recognized for spawning the Irish Literary Revival. In part, this was due to her writing plays based on Irish folklore and mythology, which helped give it renewed power and value. She also used “Kiltartanese” which is a mix of English with Gaelic.Lady Gregory enjoyed a life of estates, world travel, salons and privilege. Born to a family with a 6,000 acre estate, she married well to Sir William Henry Gregory. She and her husband traveled to India, Egypt and Italy, among other places. Influenced by her experiences, Lady Gregory wrote in support of political causes such as the Urabi Revolt in Egypt, as well as support for Irish nationalism. She spent much of her later years in theater, until she passed away at the age of 80 due to breast cancer.

 

 

 

Outlines of Gaelic Etymology

by Alexander Macbain

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Alexander Macbain was born July 22, 1855 in Scotland into poverty. His native language was Gaelic, but he attended local schools and learned English. He assisted with the Ordnance Survey in Scotland and Wales from 1871-74, but he enjoyed school and returned to earn an MA in Philosophy from King’s College. He was deeply devoted to all things history and language, and published a great deal on Gaelic language, and even served as the editor for Celtic Magazine, and then Highland Monthly. Some of his publications include: Celtic Burial, in Transactions of the Inverness Scientific Society and Field Club, Celtic Mythology and Religion and Personal Names and Surnames of Inverness.

This edition is dedicated to Robert Cooper, librarian and archivist extraordinary of the Grand Lodge of Freemasons of Scotland.

 

 

 

 

Chita: A Memory of Last Island

by Lafcadio Hearn

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On August 10, 1856, the Last Island hurricane ravaged the Louisiana coast, claimed at least 183 lives, and split an island in two, officially known as Isle Dernière, but commonly referred to as Last Island. A ship, The Star, was scheduled to pick up vacationers, but ended up being blown ashore, and the captain, Abe Smith, saved at least forty people from the blowing sand, water and winds. It was believed that there were approximately 400 people on the island during the storm, and half of them perished. After the storm subsided, not only were all built structures on the island destroyed, the island itself became a sandbar.

Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) was inspired by these events to create this historical novel. It follows a Spanish fisherman who comes to Last Island to look for useful items among the debris. Instead, he finds a young child survivor of the storm. The tale follows her life and the surprising turn of events. It offers an interesting portrayal of Louisiana at the time. Hearn wrote a great deal about Louisiana, as well as Japan. Some of Hearn’s other books include: La Cuisine Creole: A Collection of Culinary Recipes (1885), Gombo Zhebes (1885), and Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan (1894).This edition is dedicated to Francisco Alacantra, hoping he will find Hearn interesting.

 

 

 

Shakespeare and the Makers of Virginia: Annual Shakespeare Lecture, 1919

by Adolphus William Ward

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Adolphus William Ward was born on December 2, 1837 in London to a family of means. His father, John Ward, was an English diplomat. After his schooling, he being a professor of history and literature at Owens College. He also helped to found Victoria University and Withington Girls’ School. Additionally, he was the president of Royal Historical Society from 1899-1901. In 1913, he was knighted.He wrote a great deal, but arguably his most famed work is History of English Dramatic Literature to the Age of Queen Anne (1875). He edited many works as well, including the Cambridge History of English Literature, alongside A. R. Waller.

 

 

 

Bought and Paid For: A Story of To-day

by Arthur Hornblow and George Broadhurst

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George Howells Broadhurst was born on June 3, 1866 in Walsall, England. In 1882, he moved to the United States and became a playwright. He was successful, and moved into other aspects of theater production, such as being a producer, theater owner, and manager. He owned theaters across the United States, including New York, Baltimore, Milwaukee and San Francisco.Arthur Hornblow was born during 1865 in Manchester, United Kingdom. He enjoyed a life of writing and success. He worked as an editor for Theater Magazine, and then his career took off when he wrote several successful plays. His son, Arthur Hornblow, Jr. also found success in theater.

 

 

Three Wonder Plays: The Dragon, Aristotle’s Bellows, The Jester

by Lady Gregory

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Isabella Augusta, who went as Lady Gregory, was a famed Irish dramatist deeply involved in all things theater, including being a theater owner. She primarily was a writer, and received much accolades for her work, later being recognized for spawning the Irish Literary Revival. In part, this was due to her writing plays based on Irish folklore and mythology, which helped give it renewed power and value. She also used “Kiltartanese” which is a mix of English with Gaelic.

Lady Gregory enjoyed a life of estates, world travel, salons and privilege. Born to a family with a 6,000 acre estate, she married well to Sir William Henry Gregory. She and her husband traveled to India, Egypt and Italy, among other places. Influenced by her experiences, Lady Gregory wrote in support of political causes such as the Urabi Revolt in Egypt, as well as support for Irish nationalism. She spent much of her later years in theater, until she passed away at the age of 80 due to breast cancer.

 

 

 

purple border at the top with the title of the book, and an image of grapes against green scrollwork vines

Wine, Women, and Song: Medieval Latin Students’ Songs Now First Translated into English Verse with an Essay

by John Addington Symonds

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John Addington Symonds was born on October 5, 1840 in Bristol, England. He became well known as a poet, researcher, and teacher. Biographers have often remarked on Symonds’ bisexuality as being a significant influence on his life. He was in multiple relations with men and women throughout his life. These relationships often overlapped. For example, while married to his wife, Janet Catherine North, he enjoyed a four year relationship with Norman Moor. Controversially, Symonds was interested in and advocated for pederastic relationships. Moor was in his teens when he was romantically involved with Symonds. In 1873, Symonds wrote A Problem in Greek Ethics, which was a historical, detailed look at pederastic relationships in early Greek history. Much of Symonds works have not been published because they often dealt with homosexuality and were considered very taboo.

 

 

 

 

From the Heart of Israel: Jewish Tales and Types

by Rabbi Dr. Bernard Drachman

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Rabbi Dr. Bernard Drachman was born on June 27, 1861 in New York City. He received his early education at High School, Jersey City, NJ, and the Hebrew Preparatory School before going on to earn his B.A from Columbia College. Afterwards, he earned his rabbinic ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau, thanks to a scholarship. He also earned a Ph.D from the University of Heidelberg. As an American born rabbi, it was difficult for him to find a position in an Orthodox synagogue. However, he was dedicated and extremely knowledgeable and found his way to serve. He officiated as rabbi to the Oheb Sholom congregation in Newark from 1885-87, then the Congregation Beth Israel Bikkur Cholim in New York city from 1887-89, and later to that of the congregation Zichron Ephraim. He also served as a professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary.

 

 

 

 

Told in the Hills: A Novel

by Marah Ellis Ryan

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Marah Ellis Ryan was born on February 27, 1860 in Pennsylvania. She wrote a great deal, especially under the pen name Ellis Martin. She is most well known for living with Hopi in Arizona. She was an theater actress for five years, but then she went on to focus on writing. She also managed a farm near Fayette Springs in Pennsylvania. Along with Told in the Hills (1891), she also wrote On Love’s Domains (1890) and Squaw Elouise (1892).Told in the Hills was a popular novel that became a motion picture in 1919. The book and film have numerous differences, especially in the ending. It revolves around a relationship between two brothers, the US government, and the Kootenai tribe (Ktunaxa) in Montana. Unfortunately, although Ryan was often billed as an expert on Indigenous Americans, she was not familiar with Ktunaxa language, and instead substituted the Chinook language, which she was knowledgeable of. Ktunaxa is a unique language in that it is a language isolate, not like any other language in the world.

 

 

 

The Jesters: A Simple Story in Four Acts of Verse from the French of Miguel Zamacois

by John N. Raphael

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Miguel Louis Pascal Zamacoïs was born on September 8, 1866 into a family of artists. He himself became a writer of many types, including journalism, writing for the paper, Je suis partout; multiple novels; operas and numerous other pieces for the theater, including Les Bouffons; and poetry, such as L’Arche de Noé. For his work, he received the Prix de poésie de l’Académie française in 1926. He lived until March 20, 1955, and was buried in Paris.

This new edition is dedicated to Pierre Mollier, scholar and friend.

 

 

In the Great God’s Hair: Translated from the Original Manuscript

by F. W. Bain

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F.W. Bain translated this work from the original Sanskrit, and offered this as an introduction, “The name of the little Indian gable, here presented to the lover of curiosities in an English dress, is ambiguous. We may translate it indifferently, either: The New Moon in the hair of the God of Gods, or else, She That Reduces the Pride of Gods, Demons, and all the Rest of Creation, that is the Goddess of Beauty and Fortune. To those unfamiliar with the peculiar genius of the Sanskrit language, it might seem singular, that two such different ideas should be expressible by the one and the same word. but it is just in this power of dexterous ambiguity that the beauty of that language lies.”

Francis William Bain was born on April 29, 1863 and lived until March 3, 1940. He enjoyed a wide variety of pursuits in his life, ranging from being an amateur footballer to serving as a professor of history in British India. Yet he considered himself primarily a writer, specializing in fantasy, which he claimed to have translated from Sanskrit. However, these works were not directly taken from Hindu manuscripts, but were rather a mixture of Orientalism and Bain’s interest in fantasy. Although it was revealed that Bain was lying about the origins of such works as In the Great God’s Hair, his readership was unaffected. However, it is important for readers of to know that the views that this work imparts on marriage, love, and religion, are largely those of Bain’s and not a true reflection of Hinduism.

 

The White Morning: A Novel of the Power of the German Woman in Wartime

by Gertrude Atherton

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Born on October 30, 1857, in San Francisco, Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton was fortunate enough to be raised by her grandfather after her parents divorced when she was two. Her grandfather was Stephen Franklin, a relative of Benjamin Franklin, was deeply committed to her education. After completing school, she ended up eloping with her mother’s suitor, George H. B. Atherton, and moved to live with him and his family in Fair Oaks, California. Life was difficult, because of the constricting role of womanhood, Atherton found herself in. Sadly, her husband and son died as a result of two different tragedies.

Left alone to care for their daughter, Muriel, Atherton turned to writing. She quickly gained notoriety after her first book, The Randolphs of Redwood: A Romance was published. Her family was very disappointed because of the nature of the publication, so she traveled to New York and Paris, where her writing began to be embraced. She wrote under psuedonyms, including male ones such as Frank Lin, especially early in her career. She was an extraordinarily prolific writer, writing dozens of books in addition to writing for newspapers and magazines, along with plays and films. She was a feminist, and in this work, The White Morning, Atherton imagines the world as led by women.

 

The Story of Ab: A Tale of the Time of the Cave Man

by Stanley Waterloo

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Stanley Waterloo was a writer of many types of media, both fiction and non-fiction, and of books, essays and newspaper articles. Born in 1846, he showed a great deal of promise. He was to attend West Point, but due to an injury, Waterloo did not. He instead went into journalism after law school did not work out for him. His career in the news was quite successful, as Waterloo worked at numerous news outlets in the midwest, including the St. Louis Chronicle, the Chicago Tribune, and the Missouri Republican. He briefly started his own paper, The Day, in St. Paul, but returned to Chicago.

Towards Waterloo’s middle age, he moved into writing literature. He became extremely successful, particularly in England, with his novel, A Man and A Woman, which was released in 1892. This particular work, The Story of Ab, follows that of a caveman living in the Stone Age. Waterloo released several more novels, until his last one, A Son of the Ages, was released posthumously in 1914. A year before its release, Waterloo died of pneumonia.

This new edition is dedicated to Timothy Knab, longtime student of cultures

 

Adirondack Summer, 1969: A Novel

by Alan Robert Proctor

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“In Adirondack Summer, 1969, Alan Proctor has fashioned a marvelous world that invokes nostalgia and realism (and even magical realism) to superb effect. It’s a poignant, playful, intensely imagined book, written with grace and good humor and the kind of sentences all writers ache to produce. Highly recommended, whether you went to summer camp or not.”
—Brian Shawver, author of Aftermath and The Language of Fiction.

“I’m a big believer in good first lines to novels, and Alan Proctor grabs you from the first sentence.”
—Frank Higgins, playwright, author of Black Pearl Sings.

“This jewel of a novel … reminds readers of the vulnerability and gifts of summer …. I fell right into the characters, the setting and the drama ….”
—Denise Low, 2007-2009 Poet Laureate of Kansas, author of Melange Block and Jackalope.

“Alan Proctor’s Adirondack Summer, 1969, is a meditation on grief and loss, told with the verve of a John Irving novel. Proctor’s vivid sense of place makes the novel’s setting—an arts camp in the Adirondacks—a character in its own right. His cast, led by Deidre and Myron Cravitz, weave a gorgeous, often comic, tapestry of their delusions, loves, and dreams. Any reader booking a cabin at Camp Cravitz should prepare to be moved and entertained.”
—Whitney Terrell, author of The Good Lieutenant.

 

 

Shakespeare Problems: Shakespeare’s Fight with the Pirates and the Problems of the Transmission of his Text

by Alfred W. Pollard

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Alfred William Pollard, 1859-1944, was a prolific writer who specialized in literary history. He became well known for elevating the study of Shakespeare, through encouraging rigorous examination, study, and sourcing of material. As a distinguished bibliographer, Pollard rose to be Keeper of the British Museum. Additionally, he served as a Professor at the University of London, teaching English Bibliography. While he worked with numerous scholars on various problems in literature, Shakespeare was closest to his heart and he wrote a great deal about him, including Shakespeare Folios and Quartos: A Study in the Bibliography of Shakespeare’s Plays, 1909; The Foundations of Shakespeare’s Text, 1923; and A Census of Shakespeare’s Plays in Quarto (with Henrietta C. Bartlett), 1939.

 

Stamped: An Anti-Travel Novel

by Kawika Guillermo

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Winner of the 2020 Association for Asian American Studies Book Award in Prose

Award-Winning Finalist in the Fiction: Literary category of the 2019 Best Book Awards sponsored by American Book Fest

Exasperated by the small-minded tyranny of his hometown, Skyler Faralan travels to Southeast Asia with $500 and a death wish. After months of wandering, he crosses paths with other dejected travelers: Sophea, a short-fused NGO worker; Arthur, a brazen expat abandoned by his wife and son; and Winston, a defiant intellectual exile. Bound by pleasure-fueled self-destruction, the group flounders from one Asian city to another, confronting the mixture of grief, betrayal, and discrimination that caused them to travel in the first place.

“Guillermo tells the stories of American expatriates seeking to lose or remake themselves in the far-flung corners of Asia. His narrative voice—steady, visual, and evocative—is complemented by his keen ear for dialogue.”
—Peter Bacho, author of Cebu and winner of the American Book Award

“Guillermo’s novel teaches the reader how to engage the world and reveals the very best about being a traveler rather than a tourist. We follow not only a vivid visual adventure across Asia, but also a linguistic journey into understanding new language and a definition of ‘we’ that is inclusive and empowering and revealing.”
—Shawn Hsu Wong, author of Homebase and American Knees

Kawika Guillermo moves and writes throughout Asia and North America, usually embarking from his station in Hong Kong. This is his first novel.

 

Whimsical Madam New Orleans: Short Stories from the Times-Picayune

 by Carmelite Janvier, Illustrated by Standish Buell

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Carmelite Janvier came from a wealthy family and enjoyed all its trappings, along with her siblings. Born to Charles Janvier and Josephine Celeste Bush, she enjoyed life as one of eight children. However, it was the opulence that came to hurt her. Specifically, when Janvier was nine and playing abroad her family’s yacht, she was injured by a small cannon which the family used to give greetings to other vessels. The accident was so serious that Janvier lost sight in one eye, and was left disfigured, but her family’s money helped ensure she was able to receive all the specialized care she needed to recuperate, and then to continue her education and live a long and enjoyable life in the upper echelons of society. These whimsical short stories illustrate the high life and low life and its undercurrents in New Orleans during the 1920s.

 

A Century of French Fiction: Balzac, Flaubert, Stendhal and More

by Benjamin W. Wells PhD

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Benjamin Wells takes on an epic task: to catalog 115 authors, and 688 pieces of writing. Rather than focus on the popularity of the piece or the author, Wells groups them together by place or birth, historical context, and writing style, choosing to spend the most time on specific examples of writing he finds are most unique and excellent. Wells focuses on Stendhal, Balzac, Zola, and de Maupassant, and offers a historical contextualization of their writings and their impact on society.

 

 

Dialogue in the Greco-Roman World

by Leslie Kelly, Ph.D.

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This short book is designed to introduce students of ancient history to the genre known as “the dialogue.” This literary form went through periods of popularity and decline in ancient Greece and Rome but it was present from the classical period through late antiquity and carried over into medieval and Byzantine culture. For all ancient texts, historians ask who created it, when, and why? They try to determine the author’s agenda and try to situate the text within its larger historical context. For the dialogue, we must do more than this. We must consider the conventions of the genre and read later compositions in light of earlier examples of the form. This book will explore the origins of dialogue in ancient

Greece and explain how dialogues of the Greco-Roman world were intended to be read. It will examine significant examples in the development of the genre from Greek, Roman, and early Christian cultures, and discuss the issues that students must take into account in order to responsibly utilize these sources to reconstruct and understand the past.

Dr. Leslie Kelly teaches at American Public University and holds advanced degrees in Jewish and Christian Scriptures, classics, and ancient history.

 

 

American Indian Love Lyrics: and Other Verse from the Songs of North American Indians

by Nellie Barnes, Foreword by Mary Austin

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The verses selected reflect a variety of subjects, including friendship, sadness, nature, special places and religious beliefs. Although the book is old, it remains a notable source of information on Native American verse. The selections were chosen by Nellie L. Barnes and are sourced from many tribes. Barnes was interested in literature and edited other collections, such as Flowers of Remembrance, In Harbor, and American Indian Verse.

Not much is known about the life of Nellie L. Davis. She wrote into Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly, described as “the leading and most outrageous of the radical spiritualist magazines, featuring the political battles of Victoria Woodhull (1838-1927), the first woman nominated to run for president of the United States, in 1872.” She was from Louisville, Kentucky, and later married J. B. Barnes.

This new edition is dedicated to Lou Cordia, recognizing his longtime interest in Native American culture.

 

Trail of the Lonesome Pine

byJohn Fox Jr., Illustrated by F. C. Yohn

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The Trail of the Lonesome Pine is set in the Appalachian Mountains and examines a long-standing family feud between the Falins and the Tollivers, somewhat based on the life of “Devil John” Wesley Wright. The work examines the impact that industrialization and mining have had on the region, set behind a tale of romance and revenge. The Trail of the Lonesome Pine was a best-selling novel in both 1908 and 1909, and went on to several adaptations for the stage, and four times as a film, in 1914, 1916, 1923 and finally in 1936.

The work was written by John Fox, Jr. (1862-1919) who worked as a reporter for the New York Times, the New York Sun, Scribner’s and Harper’s Weekly. He wrote a series of short stories, some becoming fairly successful like The Kentuckians (1898). Fox served as a war correspondent during the Spanish-American War and the Russo- Japanese War, but continued to write a variety of short stories. He also wrote longer fiction, and The Trail of the Lonesome Pine, along with The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come became his most popular works. He died of pneumonia in 1919, while living in Big Stone Gap, Virginia. His home was turned into a museum honoring his life and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Springfield: The Novel

by William Morris

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“So why for God’s sake,” asked Mike Hanlin in his avuncular manner, “did Mary kill herself?” Hanlin, the seasoned ex-diplomat, perceptive but bewildered, finds himself stalking a dangerous unknown killer. The plot and setting are classically American with the pillars of the Catholic Church compromised and the establishment confused as crime piles on crime and sin on sin. The protagonists, some ruthless and some morally perplexed, fight to make sense of their own passions, hopes and fears. And at the center of it all, a young Catholic Priest, Father Sebastian, struggles to turn away from self-will and his obsession with his own appetites, and seeks only to know and to do the will of God. Through episodes of mounting revelation and a cast of curious, minor characters, the plot evolves to an unexpected climax, which revolves around the key question of who drove the Hummer that became the weapon of choice for the killer in his most audacious crime, a crime for which suspicion even falls on Hanlin himself.

SPRINGFIELD THE NOVEL has all the ingredients of a classic thriller with its mouth-drying tension and cryptic style. All this alongside a landscape that sets adultery, lust and selfishness against the quest for absolute purity and a more principled world.

William Morris has worked as a sheep farmer, coal miner and publisher and for the past twenty years has worked in conflict resolution, principally in the Middle East as Secretary General of The Next Century Foundation, an organization registered as a Not for Profit in London and Springfield, the city in which this novel is set. William is also Chairman of the International Communications Forum. In this capacity he has led press delegations to Iraq, Palestine, Israel, Egypt and Syria. Most recently William has been engaged in Syrian peace efforts.


William also broadcasts to the Middle East on satellite television on which he has a slot that goes out weekly subtitled into Arabic.

William believes that social deprivation is a key cause of many of the world’s problems. He also believes in the mantra that change begins with ourselves and is a member of Initiatives of Change. He cites Oscar Wilde’s maxim, “We all live in the gutter but some of us look at the Stars”.
William’s wife Veronica was a teacher and now battles Multiple Sclerosis and works with him at the Next Century Foundation. They have three children, Joseph, Loveday and Samuel and two grandchildren, Florence and Paloma.

 

A Fox-Hunting Anthology: Selections from the Writers of the 18th, 19th and 20th Centuries

by E. D. Cuming

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Edward Wfoxilliam Dirom Cuming was born in 1862, the son of the late Colonel Edward William Cuming. He studied at private schools and then began working in business overseas, primarily in Lower Burma. Soon, having enough wealth, he was able to pursue his passion of writing. He served as the assistant editor for Land and Water from 1892-1896. He also wrote numerous works about hunting, such as Fox and Hounds (1915) and British Sport Past and Present (1909) and his impressions of life in Burma, including In the Shadow of the Pagoda (1897) and With the Jungle Folk (1897). This volume adds to the literature about the British Empire and its sports, which has attracted considerable scholarship in recent years.

This edition is dedicated to Wallace Boston, keen observer of horses and hounds.

 

Edwin Arlington Robinson: A Poet’s Brave Departure

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Edwin Arlington Robinson (1869-1935) was born in Maine to a family that wished he was a daughter. Several months after his birth, fellow vacationers named him by drawing his name out of a hat, since robinsonhis family had failed to give him one. Edwin Arlington was the name selected, though his family nicknamed him “Win,” a name he despised. Many scholars of his work trace the darkness in his writing to his unhappy childhood, which included his pain when his brother, Herman, married the love of his life, Emma Loehen Shepherd. Herman ultimately died penniless of tuberculosis, while Edwin went on to study at Harvard, earn a cushy job at the New York Customs Office after President Theodore Roosevelt took a liking to his poems, and win the Pulitzer Prize three times. He has a permanent place in the canon of American literature.

This edition is dedicated to Guillermo Izabel, for those long flights.

 

 

The Passing of the Storm and Other Poems

by Alfred Castner King

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passingAlfred Castner King was known as “the blind poet of Colorado,” having lost his eyesight in a mine explosion while working as an assayer in Colorado. After the accident, he moved to Grand Junction where he helped in the construction of apartment buildings, which helped pay the bills while he wrote, played the flute, lectured and traveled around the world. Born in March 1873 in Leslie, Michigan, he spent most of his life in Colorado. He died in Grand Junction in September 1941. The Passing of the Storm expresses his deep appreciation for the life and landscapes of the West.

The Fire-Fly’s Lovers: And Other Fairy Tales of Old Japan

by William Elliot Griffis

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William Elliot Griffis (1843-1928) served in the Union Army during the Civil War, then graduated from Rutgers University in 1869. He was a tutor for Taro Kusakabe, which opened up a world of opportunity for him in Japan. In 1870, he was invited to reorganize Japanese schools by Matsujapandaira Yoshinaga. Between 1870-74, Griffis taught science, wrote English language primers, and was an intermediary between the United States and Japan. He returned to the United States to complete his studies at the Union Theological Seminary in 1877, eventually earning a Doctor of Divinity in 1884. While he was active in the parish ministry, in 1903, he decided to resign so that he could focus on writing. He wrote not only on Japan, but also on Europe, particularly the Netherlands. His books included titles on Asiatic History; China, Korea and Japan — and collections of fairy tales, such as Swiss Fairy Tales, Belgian Fairy Tales, Korean Fairy Tales, and of course, the much enjoyed The Fire-Fly’s Lovers and Other Fairy Tales of Old Japan. This edition is dedicated to Francisco Alacantra, a later day emissary of the New World to the land of the rising sun.

Songs of a Sourdough

by Robert W. Service

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Robert Service was born in 1874 and grew up in Scotland as the oldest of 10 siblings. Even as a child he craved excitement, but his energy was channeled into the quiet life of a bank clerk. He did enroll in the English Language and Literature program at the University of Glasgow, leaving after challenging a lecturer to a fistfight when the lecturer questioned Service’s ability despite his top grades. Bored, he departed for Canada. His family bought him a Buffalo Bill type outfit from an auction for the trip; not entirely practical but thoughtful! Once in Canada, Service traveled all the way across the country to Vancouver Island and ironically found himself working for the Canadian Bank of Commerce. The job allowed him to live his dreams of frontier life but without the hardships. It was in 1906 that he became a famous and well-paid poet with Songs of a Sourdough. Later, Service would write The Trail of Ninety-Eight, A Northland Romance, which would be produced as a movie in 1928 by MGM. He continued to write his whole life, penning Rhymes of a Red Cross Man (1912), Poisoned Paradise (1922), Why Not Grow Young? (1928) and Lyrics of a Lowbrow (1951). He died at his villa in France in 1958, the famous scribe of a frontier life that he profited enormously in describing but whose privations he avoided.

Stories from the Diary of a Doctor: Snippets of Early Medicine and Life in England

by L. T. Meade and Clifford Halifax MD

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Clifford Halifax was actually the pseudonym of Edgar Beaumont (1860-1921). Interestingly, he used this name only when writing with L. T. Meade. Beaumont was indeed a physician operating in the UK and wrote a variety of works related to being a physician, including This Troublesome World (1893), The Sanctuary Club (1899) and A Race With the Sun (1901). He also published a variety of short stories, with his work bordering on somewhere between semi-autobiographical, horror, detective and science fiction. L. T. Meade was also a pseudonym for Elizabeth Thomasina Meade Smith (1844-1914), whose work also stretched into various territories, including detective, fantasy, romance and science fiction. Including those works with Beaumont, Meade was also responsible for works such as A Master of Mysteries (1898), The Desire of Man: An Impossibility (1899), and The Sorceress of the Strand (1903). Describing her as a prolific author would be an understatement; she is credited with writing over 300 books in her life. She was active in other areas as well, including being a member of the Pioneer club, formed in 1892 by Emily Massingberd and predominately aimed to promote feminism and higher thought. This edition is dedicated to Dr. Bonnie Stabile, versatile leader in public health publishing.

Chinese Nights Entertainments: Stories of Old China

Collected by Brian Brown, preface by Sao-ke Alfred Sze

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“In a small country town in China there lived a great scholar named Kno Tzu Chien. This sage was an authority upon the old classics, and he also loved the folklore and fairy tales of ancient China. On winter evenings the home of this greatly loved scholar was a popular gathering place, and many of the old folks, from near and far, came and told folk tales that had been told to them in their youth— tales of old China that had been handed down from generation to generation in the same way —told at the firesides. Kno Tzu Chien presided over all these gatherings, (which might be called “Chinese Nights Entertainments”), and during the evenings would consult several old books, so as to give an accurate and detailed account of the interesting history and legendary lore which belongs to old China.” Such begins the work, Chinese Nights Entertainments. It was originally researched and published in the early 1920s amid new interest in China by Americans, and as part of the favorable response of translated Chinese poems by Amy Lowell. This work borrowed from a great many English translations of Chinese stories from the mid-1800s that were floating around London and were condensed in this book, which was prefaced by Sao-Ke Alfred Sze, Minister of China to United States, giving it authority and gravitas.

Tales of Old Japan

by A. B. Mitford

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Sir Algernon Bertram Freeman-Mitford (1837-1916) was raised to the peerage as Baron of Redesdale in 1902. He was also a Knight of the Bath and a Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order. After joining the Foreign Service in 1858, Lord Redesdale was posted in St. BookCoverImage-15Petersburg, Peking, and Tokyo. It was during his service in Japan, in 1871, that he wrote Tales of Old Japan. The book introduced a whole new audience to Japanese culture and folklore, and is considered a milestone in East-West understanding.

Espionage!

by H. R. Berndorff, Translated by Bernard Miall

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Hans Rudolf Berndorff (1895-1963) was born in Düsseldorf, Germany. From a young age was a journalist with an interest in the bizarre and adventurous, including shipwrecks and piracy. During the Nazi era he published a number of popular novels that steered away from controversy and avoided political repercussions. He used both his own his own name as well as writing as Rudolf van Wehrt and Hans Rudolf. Joseph Goebbels liked his adventurous tales and thought they contributed to public entertainment and thus helped the war effort.
This did noBookCoverImage-1t damage his career after the war; he continued his writing without any break and was used by the British in rebuilding the German press services. He had also written movie scripts during the Nazi era but because of its wartime origins, the most famous of them, Shiva and the Gallows Flower, was only released in 1993.
Espionage! was his first book. Hanne Hieber, in the Journal of Intelligence History, describes the work as the most influential fiction text in its subject area, praising its originality: “Besides the usual (male and female) suspects like Alfred Redl, Edith Cavell and Mata Hari, he had two chapters on Mademoiselle Docteur, ‘the greatest German spy.’” She adds, “In 1936, G.W. Pabst made a movie with two different casts in France and Britain. The French version was not shown before the end of the German occupation. The British version was distributed to the United States in the early 1940s.” The full story of Berndorff’s ability to remain untouched by a war that destroyed so many writers has never been fully told.

La Máquina Oscura

by D. G. Sutter

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The ground rumbles. The humming beneath begins, a droning monotonous tune that will one day drive us mad. The machines rise and steal oxygen from the air, rotating at dangerous speeds and emitting lethal radiation.sutter

Upon the return home to the small village of Montejo de la Sierra in Spain, Marco can feel the desperation from which the world is suffering at the will of these obscure machines. Our way of life, as we once knew it, has forever been mutated. Travel is obsolete. Communication is few and far between. Humanity is terrified and, worse, there is no explanation and may be no salvation.

Will the earth ever recover from the ruin that is being caused? Can we recuperate from the havoc that’s been wreaked upon this beautiful planet? As Marco and others search desperately for the answers to these questions, one thing will become clear…we are all influenced by our actions. Can he find a way to make everyone happy, whilst battling for their survival, or will civilization collapse before his very eyes?

Does the Earth have a self-destruct button?

Bugle Echoes: A Collection of the Poetry of the Civil War

Edited by Francis F. Browne

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Bugle Echoes offers a vast collection of poetry illustrating the lived experiences of the Civil War. The collection was edited by Francis Fisher Browne (1843-1913) who fought in the Civil War as a soldier in the Forty-Sixth Massachusetts Volunteers. His father, William Goldsmith Browne, was a poet and printer in Massachusetts. After the war, it was unsurprising when Browne pursued a literary career as editor of several Chicago-based journals, including a revival of The Dial, a celebrated transcendental periodical.

Browne personally knew Walt Whitman, John Greenleaf Whittier, James Russell Lowell and other eminent literary figures, many of whom shared with him the trials of the Civil War and are featured in this volume. When he died, John Muir said, “Francis Fisher Browne, or Browne the Beloved as I like to call him, was one of the finest and rarest men I ever knew.”

The Young Vigilantes: A Story of California Life in the 1850s

by Samuel Adams Drake

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The California Gold Rush really was a bonanza. Between 1849 and 1855 more than $400 million dollars was gathered by the miners; once adjusted, it is a sum today reaching into the trillions. It was a social phenomenon marked by the carnivalesque.

In his work Roughing It (1872) Mark Twain’s protagonist remarks as his brother heads YoungVigilantesFRONTCOVERWest, “Pretty soon he would be hundreds and hundreds of miles away on the great plains and deserts, and among the mountains of the Far West, and would see buffaloes and Indians, and prairie dogs, an antelopes, and have all kinds of adventures, and may be get hanged or scalped, and have ever such a fine time, and write home and tell us all about it, and be a hero…And by and by he would become very rich, and return home by sea, and be able to talk as calmly about San Francisco and ocean, and ‘the isthmus’ as if it was nothing of any consequence to have seen those marvels face to face.”
Go they did to the Land of Golden Dreams, in the largest internal migration in American history, and the adventures and tragedies have created a large and memorable literature. The Young Vigilantes tells a story of life on ship and land, centered around California during the Gold Rush.

The Torch of Liberty

by Frederic Arnold Kummer, Illustrated by Kreigh Collins

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The Torch of Liberty features several Greek stories highlighting the development of democracy. The illustrations in this volume are by Kreigh Collins (1908-1974) who created the comic strip hero Kevin the Bold, and whose papers are collected by the library of Syracuse University.

Frederic Arnold Kummer (1873-1943) was the son of a German emigrant who fought in the Civil War and helped found Kummer & Becker, the Baltimore banking firm who were agents for the North German Lloyd Steamship Line.

In he wrote The Film of Fear, the earliest known novel with a motion picture theme. Three years later he wrote the lyrics for “My Golden Girl” a popular Broadway comedy with music by Victor Herbert. Kummer’s other titles included The Green God (1911, Ladies in Hades: A Story of Hell’s Smart Set (1928) and Gentlemen in Hades: The Story of a Damned Debutante (1930). His first wife, Clare Rodman Beecher (1873-1958) was a composer and songwriter who worked with Sigmund Romberg and Jerome Kern. His son by his second wife, Marjorie McLean—Frederic Arnold Kummer Jr.—became a science fiction writer.

The collaboration of Kummer and Collins was well reviewed when it first appeared: “There have been a number of books on somewhat similar pattern – a collection of short stories designed to highlight periods in world history when the significance of freedom came to the fore. Janet Marsh’s Don’t Tread on Me, is an example. But this, though inevitably there is some overlapping, is far and away the best one that has been done. One traces the different aspects under which democracy has appeared from early Greeks to modern America, Good stories all.”

 

The Wizard

by H. Rider Haggard

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The Wizard was serialized in the African Review and then published in full in the 1896 issue of Arrowsmith’s Christmas Annual. The hero, a missionary named Owen, has to endure various trials at the hands of African tribal magicians, and discovers his own ability to predict the future and manipulate nature. The trademark Sir Henry Rider Haggard themes are much in evidence, particularly the confrontation of the West with African traditional values.

Professor Noel Cox remarks, “The interesting thing about this story (published 1896) is that it has some similarities with the history of Uganda – though I don’t think Thomas Owen, saint and martyr (as Haggard describes him on the last page) has any particular prototype. Though it is in a seWizardCOVERFRONTnse the history of Owen, it is really about Hokosa – the “Wizard” of the title – and his conversion. It is also interesting that of the supernatural events, only one major occurrence is at the hands of the pagan wizard – the raising of the spirit of Umsuka – while Owen is responsible for several – the trial by lightning (if it can be classified as miraculous – certainly the Amasuka thought so), and the vision of the plan to murder king Umsuka, as well as his call back in England.”

Sir Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) is still widely read and his characters allegedly inspired the Indiana Jones books and movies. A Rider Haggard literary trail in South Africa includes many of his old haunts, and a Rider Haggard society in England publishes a journal on his work.