Old Stories & Sayings from India, Ceylon, Burma, and the Near East

by Isa Fyvie Mayo

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Isabella Fyvie Mayo was an incredible woman. Born in 1843 in London, she enjoyed the benefits of schooling and encouragement of her writing. She worked tirelessly to help her family, but for many years she was uncompensated for her writing. Finally, once she was published it was to great acclaim with Occupations of a Retired Life (1868). She wrote numerous books including, Not by Bread Alone (1890) and Other People’s Stairs (1898). Additionally, she wrote for many popular magazines such as the Sunday Magazine, Girls’ Own Paper, and Pa Mall Gazette.Although she often wrote under the pen name, Edward Garrett, she did much to advance women’s issues as an ardent suffragist. She even became the first woman elected to a public office in Aberdeen. She considered herself an ethical anarchist and active antiracist, especially working to provide a safe haven to those from South Asia.

Old Stories & Sayings from India, Ceylon, Burma, and the Near East is a reprinted work and has been manually cleaned of blemishes.

 

 

 

Foreign Freemasonry: Its Position vis-a-vis of Christianity and of Catholicity

by D. Moncrieff O’Connor

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

 

 

Peasant Art in Sweden, Lapland and Iceland

by Charles Holme

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Art made by those not traditionally trained has several terms, including outsider art, folk art, raw art and peasant art. This particular work offers a carefully chosen selection of both the decorative
and fine arts of Sweden, Iceland, and the northern-most region of Finland. A comprehensive survey, it includes paintings, jewelry, textiles, metalwork, carving, furniture and pottery.

Charles Holme (1848-1923) was an art critic who promoted peasant art, and edited numerous books to share the artwork, including Old Houses in Holland (1913); Peasant Art in Russia (1912); and The Art of the Book (1914). Holme was born in England, and enjoyed the privileged life as the son and heir of a silk manufacturer. He also worked in the same field, even expanding the business into Japan. He retired in 1892 and then turned full-time to the arts. He began The Studio: An Illustrated Magazine of Fine and Applied Art, serving  as editor from 1895-1919, when he retired, and his son, Charles Geoffrey Holme took over.

A Dictionary of Old English Music & Musical Instruments

by Jeffrey Pulver

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Jeffrey Pulver wrote numerous works on music, including Paganini, the Romantic Virtuoso, and Aids to Elementary Violin Playing. This particular work seeks to rescue and herald the English history of music, and to elevate it to the status of music found in France, Italy and other European nations in particular. The focus of this work in the words of Pulver:

“The history of music in England, dealing with the five centuries that lie between the period which made the Reading rota possible and the death of Purcell, is a story of unimaginable fascination. Yet in spite of the labours of a few faithful workers who fought, with weak weapons, to win their merited place for the musicians of England in the affection and regard of their countrymen, it was only comparatively recently that we awoke to the fact that our musical history is as glorious a one as that possessed by any other country of Europe.”

 

Vampires and Vampirism: Collected Stories from Around the World

by Dudley Wright

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Dudley Wright’s fascinating work offers an academic treatment of the history of vampires. He traces the legend of vampires through history and around the world, making stops at Hungary, Britain, Russia, and various parts of what was then referred to as the Orient. He offers a collection of stories from these regions as well, so readers can draw their own conclusions.

Dudley Wright (1868-1950) is also an interesting character of note. He was born in England, and traveled throughout the world studying religions and other belief systems. He was a professional journalist and wrote for a variety of publications. He became the Assistant Editor of the Freemason and Masonic Editor of the Times of London, and other Masonic works. He spent a lot of his research on looking for a common thread to all religions, and wrote for numerous religious journals, such as Spiritual Power, the Homiletic Review, and the Bible Review. He flirted with various religious, including Buddhism and Catholicism, but he converted to Islam and ultimately returned to the Ahmadiyya movement.

 

Practical Falconry: To Which is Added, How I Became a Falconer

by Gage Earle Freeman

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Gage Earle Freeman (1820-1903) wrote a number of articles on falconry. He was introduced to the sport in England and retained a life-long interest in it, often working with kestrel-hawks, peregrine falcons, and sparrow hawks. He was also an esteemed poet, winning four Seatonian Prizes; a father to ten children, and married twice. He attended St. John’s College, Cambridge, graduating in 1845 with a B.A. and became an ordained priest in 1847, receiving his M.A. in 1850. In 1889, he became a vicar and a private chaplain to the Earl of Lonsdale, and remained in that position until his death.

This new edition is dedicated to the Duke of St. Albans, remembering school days in Judde House, Tonbridge.

 

Trail of the Lonesome Pine

byJohn Fox Jr., Illustrated by F. C. Yohn

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The Trail of the Lonesome Pine is set in the Appalachian Mountains and examines a long-standing family feud between the Falins and the Tollivers, somewhat based on the life of “Devil John” Wesley Wright. The work examines the impact that industrialization and mining have had on the region, set behind a tale of romance and revenge. The Trail of the Lonesome Pine was a best-selling novel in both 1908 and 1909, and went on to several adaptations for the stage, and four times as a film, in 1914, 1916, 1923 and finally in 1936.

The work was written by John Fox, Jr. (1862-1919) who worked as a reporter for the New York Times, the New York Sun, Scribner’s and Harper’s Weekly. He wrote a series of short stories, some becoming fairly successful like The Kentuckians (1898). Fox served as a war correspondent during the Spanish-American War and the Russo- Japanese War, but continued to write a variety of short stories. He also wrote longer fiction, and The Trail of the Lonesome Pine, along with The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come became his most popular works. He died of pneumonia in 1919, while living in Big Stone Gap, Virginia. His home was turned into a museum honoring his life and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.