The cover is teal and features light colored outlines of a hand and a long braid. The title, All Flowers Bloom, is in black and the author's name is in red below in a strong font.

All Flowers Bloom

by Kawika Guillermo

Arriving late March 2020

Print Price: $15.99, Kindle $8.99

In a cruise ship stateroom, a soul awkens in the afterlife, still dressed in the Roman servant garbs of his previous life.

He can’t remember much, but a silent woman stands out in his memory: his first and only love.

Unable to cope with an eternity without her, he leaps from the ship and back into the depths of the life stream.

Five hundred years later, he awakens again in the same stateroom, alone and fueled with new memories of her.

In his past lives she was a male insurgent, an elderly wise woman, an unruly servant.

For a millennia the pair are tethered together, clashing in love and fear, betraying each other in times of war and famine.

Before memory drives him mad, he vows to rescue her from the stream — even if it takes a thousand lifetimes more.


“A defiant and tender call for the power of love, across a thousand lifetimes and lands. Guillermo’s imagination is breath-taking, and he shows the power of the written word as at once the most high-fidelity and stylized of mediums.”
—Ken Liu, author of The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories and The Grace of Kings

“Kawika Guillermo has achieved an ambitious feat: to chronicle a memory—and its vast empire of battles and love, constant guises and surprises—that spans over four thousand years through a narrator who, like the beloved, is blessed, or cursed, with hundreds of lives, each rebirth announcing a different milieu, a different role. At its core, All Flowers Bloom is a lover’s discourse on desire, its multiple masks and power to make lovers and strangers, and traitors and rescuers out of us.”
—R. Zamora Linmark, author of Rolling the R’s and Leche

All Flowers Bloom is a beguiling book, with an inventive narrative unlike anything I have encountered before. This is an emotional journey through lifetimes and loves and losses. Kawika Guillermo delivers wonderment and surprise, a complex universe, and an unforgettable cast of characters.”
—Doretta Lau, author of How Does a Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?

 

Anti-Poverty Measures in America: Scientism and Other Obstacles

Editors, Max J. Skidmore and Biko Koenig

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Anti-Poverty Measures in America brings together a remarkable collection of essays in two groups. The first group consists of papers dealing with the inhibiting effects of scientism—an over-dependence on scientific methodology that is prevalent in the social sciences, particularly in political science. Employing the methods of science is vital where appropriate, but other approaches often will lead to useful insights as well, some of which may be essential. Ignoring them has deleterious effects, such as discouraging the obligation to “speak truth to power.” The second group presents papers dealing with other obstacles to anti-poverty legislation in the United States.

Papers in both groups originated as presentations during annual meetings of the American Political Science Association at panels of the APSA’s Caucus on Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy; the first group from the San Francisco meeting in 2017, and the second from the 2018 meeting in Boston. All were subsequently published in the journal related to the Caucus: Poverty and Public Policy, sponsored by the Policy Studies Organization. Recognizing their value, the PSO is pleased to present these essays to the public in this volume.

The Editors:
Max J. Skidmore is University of Missouri Curators’ Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He has been Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer to India (where he was CEO of the American Studies Research Centre), and Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong (where he was elected to chair the Board of American Studies). His publications include scores of articles and book chapters, and more than two dozen books. His major emphases are American government and political history, presidents and the presidency, social legislation (especially Social Security), and ideologies and American political thought. His Ph.D. is from the University of Minnesota.

Biko Koenig is Assistant Professor of Government & Public Policy at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, PA. Trained in ethnographic, interview based, and survey research methods, his research approach is grounded in qualitative, fieldwork based, and interpretive approaches to problem solving. His ongoing research involves labor-community coalitions that focus on low income workers and public policy.

 

Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice: Volume 1

Editor: Wendell C. Wallace, PhD

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If your desire is to attain a greater understanding of theoretical frameworks, methodologies, and pragmatic discussions on criminology and criminal justice in the Caribbean, then this is the book for you. This book is a direct response to the call for a Caribbean Criminology as espoused by Ken Pryce (1976) who pointed to the “need to examine the reality of crime from a critical standpoint in the context of the Region’s history of capitalist repression and exploitation, and in terms of the Caribbean’s structural heritage of black working-class styles of protest and modes of response to oppression through slavery down to the present stage of neo-colonialism” (p. 5).

Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice is intended for academics, criminal justice professionals, students, practitioners, policymakers, and interested persons who are desirous of improving their understanding of the challenges that arise when issues related to criminology and criminal justice cross national boundaries in the Caribbean. Conceptualized and edited by the innovative, creative, and forward-thinking scholar and criminologist, Dr. Wendell C. Wallace, Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice is a MUST read for any serious practitioner with an interest in criminological and criminal justice issues that impact the Caribbean.

 

How Did I Get Here?: A Story of Interspecies Intimacies (In Nepalese Elephant Stables)

by Kim Idol

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Kim Idol is a writer/instructor at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, partial to dogs, guns, rock-climbing and backpack traveling. She has been in love with Nepal since she first visited 8 years ago. She knew she loved the outdoors and that she would love the Himalayas, but she was unexpectedly charmed by the wildlife and the people she met on her first trip and upon returning home immediately began saving and planning in order to return. Eight years later after a tough year at home, a random mouse-click on the word elephant led her to the site that described working at the elephant stables in Chitwan. So she packed up and left home journaling her experiences in Chitwan as she went.

Nepal is the mountain, the jungle and the foothills. The country is blessed and cursed with being a popular tourist destination and while its people take advantage of the luck they are also engaged in a vigorous fight to preserve their culture and protect the park and the mountains that are home to some of the last surviving members of several endangered species including the one horned rhinoceros, the Asian elephant, the sloth bear and many bird and crocodile species. This book is about the outdoors, about a culture straddling the past and the present and about a woman finding a little peace as she treks through the result. The trip changed this traveler and she suspects she might be seeing Chitwan again.

 

Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative

by Amy M. Green

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Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative posits that the 2016 film, tied narratively to the video game Final Fantasy XV, merits far more critical attention that it has received. Given that Kingsglaive is both CGI animated and erroneously seen as only a video game tie-in, it has tended to be consistently dismissed by critics. A closer examination of the film reveals a deeply complex narrative, one that contends with the lingering cultural trauma of WWII in Japan, as especially evidenced by images of fire and burning. The film also contends with the plight of refugees and immigrants, both in Japan and around the globe, as recent years have seen a drastic spike in anti-immigrant sentiment. Finally, through the film’s hero and protagonist, Nyx Ulric, Kingsglaive presents a man who is himself suffering from trauma, standing in the present, yet unable to fully imagine a future for himself.

About the author: Amy M. Green received her Ph.D. in literature from UNLV in 2009. She specialized in Shakespeare and 19th century American literature. Today, her work has evolved and she focuses her research on the exciting and evolving field of digital narrative study. She is especially interested in the expanding presence of video games as a compelling source of narrative, one that is necessarily participatory by nature. Further still, video games have long merited the right to be considered as important cultural artifacts and her study and analysis of their stories focuses especially on their historical, political, and social relevance. She also maintains her love of the written word and loves to explore how storytelling, in all of its forms, reveals important aspects of our shared humanity. Most of all, she loves her time in the classroom, sharing ideas and thoughts with students from all backgrounds. Her classes feature the close and careful study of storytelling in both written and digital forms. She is the author of three books, Storytelling in Video Games: The Art of the Digital Narrative, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Trauma, and History in Metal Gear Solid V, and A Cure for Toxic Masculinity: Male Bonding and Friendship in Final Fantasy XV as well as numerous articles.

 

Bunker Diplomacy: An Arab-American in the U.S. Foreign Service

by Nabeel Khoury

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Nabeel Khoury has written a remarkably cogent memoir.  He not only details life in the Foreign Service in a highly entertaining and engaging style, but also provides provocative and telling insights into many of the crises in the Middle East…From Egypt, to ‘The Magic Kingdom’ to Iraq, Morocco and Yemen — Dr. Khoury undertook his duties with a flair that was both bold and unique. I only wish that American policy makers would read his chapters on Morocco and Yemen in particular, and benefit from his general policy recommendations – It might induce some humility and second thoughts on some important “lessons learned.”
Mark G. Hambley
Former Ambassador to Qatar and Lebanon 
This is a gripping narrative that fuses two stories in one.  The first is the academic and political journey of a fascinating man standing between two worlds — Beirut and Washington, Arabness and Westerness, the State Department and the Middle East…The second narrative is a story of America itself as a great power casting a long shadow over the Arab world. The bureaucratic battles described as occurring inside different presidential administrations over four decades reveal a foreign policy often caught between conflicting personalities and demands. Major events like the Gulf War, Iraq War, and Arab Spring are trenchantly retold from the perspective of policymakers, diplomats, and intelligence officers. That these two stories come from the same book is reason enough to read it, but that they come from the career of the same individual will make readers never forget it.
Moulay Hicham el-Alaoui
President Hicham Alaoui Foundation
Nabeel Khoury – an accomplished Arab-American diplomat – offers readers a searing personal journey through America’s trials and tribulations in the Middle East.
William J. Burns, President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Former Deputy Secretary of State

After twenty-five years in the Foreign Service, Dr. Nabeel A. Khoury retired from the U.S. Department of State in 2013 with the rank of Minister Counselor. He taught Middle East and US strategy courses at the National Defense University and Northwestern University. In his last overseas posting, Khoury served as deputy chief of mission at the U.S. embassy in Yemen (2004-2007). In 2003, during the Iraq war, he served as Department spokesperson at US Central Command in Doha and in Baghdad.

Follow Nabeel on Twitter @khoury_nabeel

 

 

 

Transylvania in 1922: Report of the Commission Sent by the American and British Unitarian Churches to Transylvania in 1922

by Louis C. Cornish

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In 1922, a joint commission of US and UK Unitarian Churches traveled to Transylvania after concerns over religions persecution arose in a prior visit in 1920. The Commission was gladdened to see an increase in liberty, but upset to discover that the Romanian government was not wholly supportive of not just Unitarians, but other religious organizations, such as the Roman Catholics, Presbyterians, and Lutherans. Namely, they were upset that endowments and land for these religious institutions was being taken back.

In this work, Louis C. Cornish has compiled an interesting look at Transylvania during this time period. He concludes with a plea to support a Unitarian Mission House in Budapest, which, at the time, had over six thousand Unitarians, and a single church with a seating capacity of 250 to support them.