Sources in Late Antiquity and Byzantium

by Leslie Kelly

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This book introduces the student of Late Antiquity and Byzantium to the types of sources they are most likely to encounter in their research, explaining how these genres work and how best to utilize them as sources for history. When attempting to draw on a letter, a legal text, a code of conduct, a sermon, a speech of praise, or a Life, the student of history should be familiar with the usual formats and themes of that genre. The historian should also have in mind how that type of writing functioned within the larger society. This book provides a starting point for these goals. The work is divided into the broad, sometimes overlapping, categories of panegyrics and orations, sermons, hagiography and biographies, legal and administrative texts, and literary letter collections. Each genre is situated into its historical and social context, and its characteristic forms described. Such analyses, the intention behind these texts, what led to their development, and the part they played in their societies, provide a unique lens into the world of Late Antiquity and Byzantium.

Dr. Leslie Kelly is Professor of History at American Public University. She is the author of Dialogue in the Greco-Roman World and Prophets, Prophecy, and Oracles in the Roman Empire: Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman Cultures.

 

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Contra-amor, poliamor, relaciones abiertas y sexo casual: Reflexiones de lesbianas del Abya Yala

by Norma Mogrovejo

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Desde la voz, pensamiento y experiencias de lesbianas contra amoro-sas y poliamorosas, Norma Mogrovejo reflexiona sobre la insurgencia a normas que controlan y privatizan el cuerpo y la sexualidad de las mu-jeres. El discurso del amor romántico ha fagocitado al movimiento ho-mosexual y las lesbianas radicalizan la práctica cotidiana cuestionando a las instituciones que siguen traficando con ellas (al amor, el matrimonio, la familia, el parentesco).

El contra amor es una ruptura epistémica, un quebranto con el some-timiento que el amor romántico impone a las mujeres controlando sus vidas; y un laboratorio de experimentación donde las certezas son acaso mitos sin reactivos. Mogrovejo complejiza las preocupaciones de las lesbianas por entablar acuerdos éticos amorosos entre las socias, por sacar al Estado patriarcal de la cama y el entorno, por realizar alianzas de vida posrupturas, por resignificar el placer perejil y privado, entre otras. El amor es un territorio fundamentalmente político, que organiza jer-arquías, sometimiento y dominacíon. Pero también es lugar de rupturas y locuras.

Esta es una propuesta de quiebra con el individualismo amoroso que alimenta fundamentalmente al capitalismo neoliberal y una reconsid-eración de la comunalidad amorosa. Contra-amor, poliamor, relaciones abiertas, sexo casual, anarquía amorosa, ruptura de la monogamia obligatoria, son conceptos o experiencias, que se discuten, entre otras.

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Del sexilio al matrimonio: Ciudadanía sexual en la era del consumo neoliberal

by Norma Mogrovejo

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Del estudio del sexilio a la crítica de la familia lésbica, Norma Mogrovejo sigue la pista sutil de la infiltración capitalista en la vida de las personas. Si el sexilio nos habla de la persecu-ción, la tortura, el sojuzgamiento de la disidencia sexual y sus dificultades para alcanzar una subjetivación, en países donde la discriminación racial y la xenofobia producto de los nacio-nalismos no dejan más opciones a las lesbianas que la migración y el exilio, el segundo nos lleva a reflexionar so-bre los riesgos de la falsa conciencia en el ejercicio de los derechos econó-micos y de transmisión de la ciuda-danía que se adquieren al conformar una familia.

Josiah Wedgwood, F.R.S., His Personal History

by Samuel Smiles

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Josiah Wedgwood was a celebrated entrepreneur and abolitionist. Born in England in 1730, even as a young child he showed great skill as a potter. He worked in his family business, which focused on lower quality pottery. However, Wedgewood apprenticed with Thomas Whieldon, and later worked with chemist, Joseph Priestley, to gain a much better understanding of both physical skill and manipulation of materials. Wedgewood also benefited from his marriage to Sarah Wedgwood, and her very wealthy family, which gave him the monetary requirements for starting a large pottery manufacturing business.

The Wedgwood Company specialized in creamware, a cheaper but lovely alternative to porcelain. He also developed other pottery innovations, such as green glazes, and jasperware. In order to build his business, he focused on new types of marketing, such as direct mail, free delivery, and buy one get one free sales, since his pottery innovations were often copied by competitors.

Josiah Wedgwood was an abolitionist, and created a seal for the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade. This medallion was reproduced countless times and distributed widely. The cameo, featuring an African male in chains with, “Am I not a man and a brother?” was found everywhere, from jewelry to hanging in professional offices, across the Americas.

This edition is dedicated to Professor India R. D’Avignon, able creator and lover of beauty.

Select Historical Memoirs of the Religious Society of Friends, Commonly Called Quakers: Being a Succinct Account of Their Character and Course During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

by William Hodgson

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William Hodgson Jr. was born on May 24th, 1804 in England. His father was a Unitarian minister, but after hearing from a Quaker, Thomas Scattergood, he converted and joined the Society of Friends. Hodgson Jr. relocated to Philadelphia in 1827, where he would go on to marry his wife, Elizabeth Richardson and then have a daughter with her, Mary.

Hodgson wrote a great deal about the Society of Friends, including “A brief account of the sorrowful lapse from the first principles in the Religious Society of Friends” (1862), and the two volume work, “The Society of Friends in the Nineteenth Century” (1875). He was very involved in the operational functions of the local Friends Society, and eventually established the General Meeting of Friends for Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware.

This new edition is dedicated to the library of the Friends Meeting of Washington D.C.

The History of Trade Unionism

by Sidney and Beatrice Webb

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Originally published in 1894, The History of Trade Unionism was written by Sidney and Beatrice Webb to offer insight on the history of the British trade union movement’s development prior to the 1900s. Beatrice and Sidney Webb were economists, sociologists, historians, and socialists. The Webbs were also founders of the London School of Economics, the Fabian Society, and founded New Statesman magazine in 1913. Beatrice wrote a great deal, including the influential book, The Cooperative Movement in Great Britain, published in 1891. She also did a lot of research and assisted with Life and Labour of the People of London (1902–1903), a 17-volume book by Charles Booth.

Archival holdings for this work are held in the Webb Collection at the London School of Economics.

The Great American Fraud: A Series of Articles on the Patent Medicine Evil, Reprinted from Collier’s Weekly

by Samuel Hopkins Adams

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This work is a collection of articles that originally were featured in Collier’s Weekly. Samuel Hopkins Adams was a reporter born on January 26, 1871 in Dunkirk, New York. He was an investigative reporter, first working with the New York Sun. He later joined McClure’s Magazine, which was famous for their muckraking works by esteemed reporters like Ida Tarbell and Lincoln Steffens.

The collection of these articles had a significant impact on society, as it helped lead to the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act in 1906. Adams was horrified by the false claims that a lot of medicines were making at the time. His research and writing resonating with a lot of Americans, leading to public outcry and action.

Adams was a prolific writer. In addition to investigative journalism, he also wrote biographies, historical works, and fiction, including titillating novels under the pseudonym Warner Fabian, typically featuring stories of young women during the Jazz Age. Many of his writings went on to become adapted for film, including Wandering Fires, Men in Her Life, and The Gorgeous Hussy.

This new edition is dedicated to Alon Ben-Meir, able scholar and courageous voice of reason.

Journal of a Trip to California: Across the Continent from Weston, Mo., to Weber Creek, Cal., in the Summer of 1850

by C. W. Smith, by R. W. Vail

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Found in the litter of a storeroom was a small 4×6 notebook bound in leather. The notebook contained pressed flowers, plants, and the story of C. W. Smith’s journey to California. C. W. Smith’s father, William Smith, came to the United States from England in 1831 and lived near Victor, NY. After gold was discovered in California, C. W. made his way out west in 1850. The journal begins when C.W. arrives in Centreville, Indiana. This works offers an interesting look at the Gold Rush and in particular, the Overland Trail.

Robert William Glenroie Vail (1890-1966) wrote the brief introduction to this work. He was born in Victor, NY, but worked in Minnesota, and then New York City for the bulk of his life, as an editor, collector, lecturer, writer, historian, director and bibliographer.

This new edition is dedicated to John Cooper, Bibliophile and Freemason.

Extracts From the Minutes and Epistles of the Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, Held in London

by Religious Society of Friends

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The Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends in Britain was known as the London Yearly Meeting until 1995. It was a place for Friends to come together from across the United Kingdom, held in various places across England, the Isle of Man, Scotland and Wales. The tradition began as early as the 1650s, and by 1660 an annual tradition was set. Minutes and other notes from these meetings were recorded in 1672 and onwards. These early meetings were a brave act, as in England the Toleration Act had not been passed until 1689, and even then the Friends were viewed suspiciously by the government.

These minutes offer a helpful glimpse into the rich history of the Friends, their internal development, and external relationships.

This new edition is dedicated to the members of the Friends Meeting of Washington DC.

Reminiscences of a Stock Operator

by Edwin Lefevre

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“Speculation in stocks will never disappear. It isn’t desirable that it should. It cannot be checked by warnings as to its dangers. You cannot prevent people from guessing wrong no matter how able or how experienced they may be. Carefully laid plans will miscarry because the unexpected and even the unexpectable will happen. Disaster may come from a convulsion of nature or from the weather, from your own greed or from some man’s vanity; from fear or from uncontrolled hope. But apart from what one might call his natural foes, a speculator in stocks has to contend with certain practices or abuses that are indefensible morally as well as commercially.”

Edwin Lefevre writes in detail about life as a speculator in the stock market, namely, the life of Jesse Lauriston Livermore (1877-1940), a stock trader, and leading day trader. He was known for shorting just prior to major world events, like the 1929 stock market crash, and the 1906 earthquake that decimated San Francisco. Livermore’s positions during the stock market crash caused many people to directly blame him for the economic collapse. While much of the field, namely the technology around it, has changed, much of Lefevre’s advice is often sought out, as Livermore was known for studying emotion and the impact it had on the market.

This edition is dedicated to Eric Mullis, gifted banker with a keen sense of the extraordinary cycles and chaos of the financial world.

The Little Grandmother of the Russian Revolution: Reminiscences and Letters of Catherine Breshkovsky

by Catherine Breshkovsky
Edited by
Alice Stone Blackwell

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Catherine Breshkovsky was the abbreviated name of Yekaterina Konstantinovna Breshko-Breshkovskaya, born on January 25, 1844 in Russia. She was born into a wealthy family and received a quality education. She married at roughly the age of 24, but she later left her husband to start an anarchist commune with her sister and another friend. Although she long had an interest in politics, she became deeply involved in the revolutionary movement, part of which involved settling into peasant villages and spreading political ideas. She was arrested at the age of 30 after her false passport was detected on political grounds, namely for being a part of the “Russian socialistic and revolutionary party.” She was convicted and exiled to Siberia.

After 22 years, she was released in 1896, and immediately joined back with the revolutionary movement, and ultimately the Socialist-Revolutionary Party. In 1910, she was sentenced again to life in exile in Siberia, but by then Breshkovsky had international prominence. There was international pressure to release Breshkovsky from solitary confinement after a failed attempt to escape. After the February Revolution of 1917, Breshkovsky was welcomed and released as a legendary figure of Russia. She spent the remainder of her life in Europe, including Paris and Prague fighting Communism.

The Life of the Bee

by Maurice Maeterlinck

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Maurice Maeterlinck was born in August 1862 in Belgium to a wealthy family. Thanks to their abundance, Maeterlinck was able to complete law school at the University of Ghent, travel and write. Instead of practicing law, as his father wished, Maeterlinck focused on writing. He found success with his first play, Princess Maleine. He wrote several books that were well received, such as Twelve Songs (1896), The Treasure of the Humble (1896), and The Life of the Bee (1901). For his works, in 1903 Belgium awarded him the Triennial Prize for Dramatic Literature.Several of Maeterlinck’s writings had challenged the Catholic Church. He had attended the Jesuit College of Sainte-Barbe, which had left him with a disdain for organized religion in general, and Catholicism in particular. He also railed against Germany during both World Wars, which caused him to flee to the United States in 1940. He left for France after the war ended in 1947. One major criticism of Maeterlinck’s work was his plagiarism of La Vie des Termites (The Life of Termites), in which he directly took writings by Eugène Marais in a series of Dutch articles and translated them into French, claiming them as his own. Despite this outcry, Eugène Marais was not recognized by Maeterlinck in the work, and Maeterlinck continued to write and receive accolades for his work. Maeterlinck died in 1949 in France, after suffering a heart attack.

West Virginia: Its Farms and Forests, Mines and Oil-Wells: with a Glimpse of its Scenery, a Photograph of its Population, and an Exhibit of its Industrial Statistics

by Jacob Richards Dodge

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Jacob Richards Dodge was born on September 28, 1823 in New Boston, New Hampshire. His family traced their arrival to the United States in 1638 from England. Dodge enjoyed the benefits of childhood education in both traditional academic and technical components, which gave him a firm foundation for the rest of his life.

Dodge went on to teach in Mississippi from 1845-9, then later returned to the northeast US as an editor from 1850 up until around the start of the Civil War. Afterwards, be began working for the US Department of Agriculture. He focused on rural economics, edited innumerable reports and handled foreign commissions, and took a special interest in West Virginia as this classic demonstrates. On October 1, 1902 he passed away in Woburn, Massachusetts, and was buried in the Universalist Church Cemetery in Nashua, New Hampshire.

This edition is dedicated to Vernon Smith of American Public University, astute appreciator and energetic contributor to modern West Virginia and its role in modern education.

A Buddhist Catechism: An Outline of the Doctrine of the Buddha Gotama in the Form of Question and Answer

by Subhadra Bhikshu

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Subhadra Bhikshu, also known as Friedrich Albert Oswald Zimmermann, was born in 1852 in Degerlach. He was a journalist, a writer and a Buddhist. Bhikshu wrote this work to offer insight on Buddhism, aimed at primarily European audiences. As he wrote in the preface of Buddhism,
“a doctrine free from dogma and from formalism in entire harmony with Nature and her laws; the grandest truths, satisfying alike to mind and heart, expressed in simple terms, intelligible to the humblest capacity, yet of a significance so profound as not to be within easy sounding even by the philosophic and scientific European…”

This work was well received and translated into multiple languages, including English, German and French. On June 30, 1917 he passed away in Stuttgart.

This edition is dedicated to George Nguyen, keen and able supporter of Buddhist scholarship.

Trout-Fishing for the Beginner

by Richard Clapham

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As Richard Clapham introduced his work on trout fishing,
“Although anglers are well supplied with books pertaining to their favourite sport, the majority of such volumes appeals more to the practised fisherman than the novice. Many a beginner, however, is dependent on books for information regarding trout-fishing and the tools of the craft, and naturally expects to find simple hints that will start him on the road to success. The acquisition of an ill-balanced rod and unsuitable tackle tends to engender a slovenly method of fishing that is absolutely detrimental to good sport. A fair start, with a few simple but correct items of outfit, is everything ; the proper methods will then be cultivated from the beginning. It is, therefore, with the idea of helping the beginner that I have written this book, and I hope the information contained therein may prove useful to prospective anglers of both sexes.”

This edition is dedicated to Robert Rich Jr., angler extraordinary in many seas.

From Slavery to Wealth, The Life of Scott Bond: The Rewards of Honesty, Industry, Economy and Perseverance

by Daniel Arthur Rudd

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Scott Bond was born into slavery in Madison County, Mississippi. Due to the inhumanity of slavery, Bond’s exact birth year is not known, outside from being sometime in the early 1850s. Despite the intolerable cruelties Bond faced, he went on to become a high powered farmer and entrepreneur. He was extremely highly regarded both locally, and nationally for his skilled business acumen. He was selected to represent the National Negro Business League. Sadly, in 1933, Bond was killed by one of his bulls. At the time of his passing, he owned and farmed 12,000 acres, plus livestock, ran a large mercantile store, a gravel pit, lumber yard, saw mill and at least five cotton gins.

Biographer Daniel Arthur Rudd was a highly esteemed activist, author, founder of the Black Catholic Congress Movement, and editor and publisher of The American Catholic Tribune. He accomplished a great deal despite having been born into slavery in 1854 in Bardstown, Kentucky. By 1866, Rudd was emancipated and receiving an education while living in Springfield, Illinois. He worked as an accountant for Scott Bond. The book is co-authored with Theophilus Bond, who was Scott Bond’s second born son.

Reports On British Prison-Camps In India And Burma

by International Red Cross Committee

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Across India and Burma, England built several camps to house primarily Turkish prisoners of war, but there were also camps for civilians, including for women and children considered to be of ‘enemy nationalities.’ This report by the Red Cross gives a report not only of the conditions, but of the location of each camp and various factors, ranging from altitude and climate to measures of cleanliness and hygiene.

Aside from obvious concerns over imprisoning large swaths of a population and issues of colonialism, the report sheds some light on religious customs, dietary needs and food sources, climate, health, language and local customs of the era.

This new edition is dedicated to the nursing and medical sciences faculty of the American Public University System.

Trump, The Wannabe Dictator: How We Got to This Dire State of Affairs

by Alon Ben-Meir

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Contrary to his campaign slogan, Trump did not make America great again—he brought peril on America’s greatness because of his dictatorial ambitions and the manner by which he has been pursuing those aims since he came to power. The book reveals how Trump’s governance is starkly different from any of his predecessors, due to his incessant lies, misleading statements, and corruption. Ben-Meir surveys Trump’s colossal failure in foreign and domestic policies, and the great danger he poses to America’s democracy. Highlighted is his aggressive style and deep disdain for Democrats, which has polarized the country and brought it to the precipice of violent confrontation between his supporters and detractors, which should concern every American.

Professor Alon Ben-Meir is an expert on Middle East and West Balkan affairs, international negotiations, and conflict resolution. In the past two decades, Ben-Meir has been directly involved in Track II diplomacy involving Israel and its neighboring countries and Turkey. Ben-Meir is a Senior Fellow at the World Policy Institute, is featured on a variety of television networks, and regularly briefs at the U.S. State Department for the International Visitor Leadership Program. He writes a weekly article that is syndicated globally. He has authored seven books related to the Middle East, and is currently working on two new books about Syria and Turkey.

Ben-Meir is on Facebook at @ABenMeir, and Twitter at @AlonBenMeir.

It Can Happen Here: A Novel Look Backward

by Max J. Skidmore

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It Can Happen Here is set in the near future following the term of a rogue president. Its protagonist has kept a detailed journal of American politics of the period. He responds to numerous requests from family and friends for descriptive analyses of the 2020 elections and the resulting first year of the new administration. Drawing from the journal, he produces an unconventionally forthright study drawing upon fact and common sense.

Like his protagonist, author Max J. Skidmore has a background well suited for the task. Throughout a long life, he migrated far from his youthful extreme conservatism. His Ph.D. in American Studies enriched his views, as did living abroad. He has been a professor and dean at two American universities, and was the founding head of a political science department at another. He was CEO of a large library and research centre in India. He was senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong. He has published widely, and was founding editor of a peer-reviewed academic quarterly. Never an ivory tower academician, he earned a pilot’s license, and has long practiced martial arts (holding several advanced black belts). He has produced It Can Happen Here as the final part of a trilogy of sorts, along with Unworkable Conservatism, 2017, and The Common Sense Manifesto, 2020. Each of these approached America’s politics from a different point of view. It Can Happen Here is his first application of fiction to complete the truth of the whole.

Peacebuilding: A Personal Journey

Foreword by His Holiness the Dalai Lama
by David L. Phillips

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David L. Phillips is Director of the Program on Peace-building and Rights at Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights. Phillips served as Foreign Affairs Expert and as Senior Adviser to the U.S. Department of State and as Senior Adviser to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. He has worked at academic institutions as Executive Director of Columbia’s International Conflict Resolution Program, Director of American University’s Program on Conflict Prevention and Peace-building, a Fellow at Harvard University’s Future of Diplomacy Project, Visiting Scholar at Harvard’s Center for Middle East Studies, and Professor at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna. He worked at think-tanks such as the Council on Foreign Relations, the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the Atlantic Council, and the International Peace Research Institute, Oslo. Phillips has also been a foundation executive, serving as President of the Congressional Human Rights Foundation and Executive Director of the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity. Phillips was an analyst and commentator for NBC News, CNBC, and the British Broadcasting Company. He has authored many books, policy reports and opinion pieces.

Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice: Volume 2

Dr. Wendell C. Wallace, Editor

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In this volume and the one that precedes it, Dr Wendell C. Wallace has not only succeeded in bringing together a fascinating collection of papers that illustrate the uniqueness (as well as sharedness) of Caribbean Criminology, he has succeeded in putting Caribbean Criminology very firmly back on the intellectual map. This book deserves to be read by academics and students of Criminology and related disciplines from across the globe.
—Professor Kevin Haines, The University of Trinidad and Tobago

This volume makes an efficacious contribution to Caribbean research on crime and violence. It provides criminological insights on a range of topics such as paradigms of justice, perspectives on policing and incarceration, the geopolitical context for extradition, and violence reduction strategies. This rich and profound installment will be useful to an international community of researchers, practitioners and policymakers. It also makes a strong case for the role and impact of post-Colonial scholarship.
—Dr. Vaughn Crichlow, Associate Dean and Associate Professor, College of Social Work and Criminal Justice, Florida Atlantic University

 

A path-breaking and comprehensive work, Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice (Volume 2) comes at a time when societies in the Caribbean region are grappling with a plethora of issues within their criminal justice systems and with crime in all its iterations and when the structure of the justice system on which all of these societies are premised is being challenged to adjust to changes in societal mores. Volume 2 of this edited book adds to the growing body of scientific, empirical, and theoretical literature on criminology and criminal justice in the Caribbean. In a similar vein to Volume 1, this book is a direct response to the call for a Caribbean Criminology, as espoused by Ken Pryce (1976), and is aimed at whittling away the “epistemological coloniality” or the dominance and transfer of knowledge from the Global North to the Global South, more specifically, the Caribbean. This edited book also aims at reducing the “coloniality of knowledge” (Smith, 2012) and thus enhances epistemological diversity in the postcolonial Anglophone Caribbean. Bringing together a broad range of experts, this edited book sheds light on key criminological and criminal justice topics in the Caribbean. This not only brings to the fore socio-legal and criminological issues plaguing the Caribbean, but also proffers suggestions and recommendations aimed at alleviating these concerns. This book is therefore an essential reading for those engaged with Caribbean—or decolonial—Caribbean criminology and criminal justice.

Policy Perspectives from Promising New Scholars in Complexity: Volume IV

Editors: Dr. Liz Johnson , Dr. Joseph Cochran, Kristopher Heiser 

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The world is getting more complex causing policy problems to seemingly get bigger and become more intractable. Traditional approaches and conventional methodologies alone are no longer adequate to solve policy problems in our interconnected global environment. Promising new scholars in the field of policy and complexity are breaking boundaries and laying the groundwork for innovative perspectives on how to better define policy problems, impacts, attitudes, and solutions. Whether in the field of economics, education, energy, health, human security, or transportation, the selected essays and research in this book demonstrate how essential new thinking and approaches are needed.

These scholars have demonstrated vision, imagination, diligence, passion, and courage for solving problems. Don’t miss how some of the top promising new scholars address problems and add to creating viable solutions to some of the biggest policy issues of our day.

The Forgotten Army: The American Eighth Army in the Southern Philippines 1945

by Robert M. Young

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History has produced many famous armies. It has also produced several that few knew even existed. The American Eighth Army of World War II is one such force. They existed for only about 8 months yet saw action throughout the Southwest Pacific, specifically in the Philippines. Under the command of General Robert Eichelberger they conducted operations in the Southern Philippines, on the islands of Panay, Negros, Cebu, and Mindanao, as well as conducting mopping up operations on Leyte and Luzon. It was a small army, never having more than 5 divisions, and other than Mindanao those divisions never fought together. It was also an army that never experienced defeat. They experienced frustration, a tenacious enemy, and at times shortages of troops. Yet victory was at every turn. The war was coming to an end and the Eighth Army played its part by liberating the rest of the Philippines from Japanese control. The atomic bombs made an invasion of Japan unnecessary but the Eighth Army stood ready to take part in what would have been one of history’s largest operations.

About the author:

Dr. Robert Young received a B.A. from St. John’s University, an M.A. from Brooklyn College, and a Ph.D in military History from the C.U.N.Y. Graduate Center. He is currently a Professor of History and Military History at American Military University. He is the author of several books on World War II in the Southwest Pacific Area (SWPA) ad well as numerous articles on World War II and post-World War II conflicts. A New York City native and United States Army veteran, he currently lives in Long Island with his wife and two children.

The Garden at Rose Brake: Garden Writings of Danske Dandridge

Collected and Introduced by Justin McHenry

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Caroline “Danske” Dandridge (1854-1914) was a prominent West Virginian poet and historian of her generation. In numerous articles published in the leading gardening magazines of the time, Dandridge brought readers to her country estate on the outskirts of Shepherdstown, West Virginia. A place she called Rose Brake. The Garden at Rose Brake is the first collection of Danske Dandridge’s garden writings. These articles provide delicate and sumptuous descriptions of Rose Brake’s gardening delights and offer a glimpse into the life of one of West Virginia’s most acclaimed writers.

Justin McHenry is a writer and historian, and the archivist for American Public University System.

Outlines of Nursing History

by Minnie Goodnow

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Minnie Goodnow was born on July 10, 1871 in Albion, New York. She dedicated her life to leadership in nursing — working, teaching and as a historian of the field. During World War I she joined the Harvard Unit of American medical practitioners and worked in military hospitals in England and France. She wrote a great deal about her experiences there, particularly for the need of professional nurse education. Upon returning to the United States, she continued to write and lecture on this and other topics. Some of her books include Ten Lessons in Chemistry for Nurses (1914), Outlines of Nursing History (1916), War Nursing (1918), Practical Physics for Nurses (1919), and The Technic of Nursing (1928).

She often served as the superintendent of nurses in hospitals, including those in Rhode Island, Michigan, Colorado and in Washington DC. She was an organizing member of the Congress of the International Council of Nurses in Paris. Goodnow traveled to over forty countries to lecture, teach and do research for her books. She passed away at the age of 80, renowned as a pioneer in the field of nursing and nursing education.

This new edition is dedicated to Dr María Pérez, scholar and teacher.

sepia toned drawing of a desert scene

Vanished Arizona: Recollections of My Army Life

by Martha Summerhayes

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Born on October 21, 1844, Martha Summerhayes was raised in Nantucket, Massachusetts. She enjoyed two years abroad in Germany where she studied literature. She returned to the United States, and ultimately married a Civil War veteran, John Wyer Summerhayes, who was still actively serving in the US Army. Vanished Arizona is a work of her recollected memories of traveling with him and his regiment, across the desert, while pregnant, during the ‘Apache Wars.’ Summerhayes gives birth while on this journey and describes the difficulties of childbirth and aftercare in an unforgiving desert, with no real information available.

Summerhayes’ writing is reflective of her white, upper class attitudes, which some readers find reliable, while others find mired in prejudice. Either way, Summerhayes offers a very unique perspective of military life, and paints a very vivid portrayal of the complexities of travel, toilet, food, and medical care during the 1870s. This autobiographical account was published originally in 1908 to many accolades from both civilians and veterans. Summerhayes died on May 12, 1926, and is interred at Arlington National Cemetery with her husband, John.

Spiritualism: A Popular History from 1847

by Joseph Martin McCabe

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Joseph Martin McCabe was born on November 12, 1867. At the age of 15 he began training in the Franciscan order, and in 1890 was ordained. He was praised for his excellent scholarly work, especially in philosophy and was selected to study at the Catholic University of Louvain. By February 1896, he left the priesthood after losing his faith. Of his experience, McCabe wrote From Rome to Rationalism, published in 1897, and later the expanded version, Twelve Years in a Monastery.

McCabe was a truly prolific writer, publishing over 250 works. He became a secretary of the Leicester Secular Society, a founding board member in 1899 of the Rationalist Press Association, a member of the South Place Ethical Society, the National Secular Society, an advocate of women’s rights, associated with the Rationalist Association, and much more throughout his life.

McCabe was extremely critical of the spiritualism movement. Among other confrontations, in 1920 McCabe debated the famous author Arthur Conan Doyle, a spiritualist advocate. This work is a collection of arguments against spiritualism, and debunks many of its popular claims. McCabe felt spiritualism was a collection of tricks.

The new edition of this volume is dedicated to those scholars and scientists studying the perplexing history of spiritualism.

Studies in Ethics for Nurses

by Charlotte A. Aikens

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Charlotte Albina Aikens dedicated her life to nursing. In 1868 she was born in Mitchell, Ontario, Canada. During the Spanish-American War she volunteered her services as a nurse. Later, she went to serve as director of Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, DC. She left to work as the superintendent of nurses at Methodist Hospital in Des Moines, IA. Aikens also worked in Columbia Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA.

In addition to her services in hospitals, she wrote voluminously about nursing. Aikens was named associate editor of National Hospital Record in 1902), and for Trained Nurse and Hospital Review, she became associate editor in 1911, and four years later became the editor in 1915. In addition to editing journals, she wrote numerous books, like Studies in Ethics for Nurses in 1916. On Oct 20, 1949, she passed away in Detroit, Michigan

Old-Time Punishments

by William Andrews

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Originally published in 1890, this work sheds interesting commentary and illustration of various treatments and devices used to punish people convicted of a crime. However, as Andrews discusses, sometimes these trials were a sham, or simply through public opinion and not evidence. Many of these punishments were awful and could lead to death. Andrews details some, including whipping, the pillory, the stocks, the scold’s bridle, and various forms of tortured execution, such as pressing, and quartering.

Author William Andrews spent a great deal of time researching this topic. In 1881, he published a small booklet, “Punishments in the Olden Time.” It was so successful, he sold all four thousand copies. Surprised and emboldened, Andrews did more research, writing and published this work, Old-Time Punishments.

Doctor Judas: A Portrayal of the Opium Habit

by Charles Evans

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William Rosser Cobbe was a Chicago journalist who became addicted to opium, which he nicknamed ‘Doctor Judas.’ He was addicted for at least nine years at the time of writing his account, and discusses the mental and physical toll years of addiction took on himself, as well as that of his family. He hoped that his account would cause physicians to reconsider so generously prescribing opium, along with other drugs. Cobbe also writes of other addictive agents, such as cigarettes and cocaine.

At the time of his death, it did not appear that Cobbe had fully kicked his addictions. He was found dead in a hallway in 1907. He was doing various writing jobs while living in New York, where he had moved three years before his passing. He was estranged from his family, as his wife and two daughters were living in Chicago. It is believed that Cobbe was originally a medical doctor, but lost his position due to addiction.

Friends in the Seventeenth Century

by Charles Evans

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When introducing his work, Charles Evans wrote the following,
“The motive that has prompted the preparation of the present work, has been the hope that, by thus bringing the substance of the principal parts of the narratives of other writers into a more condensed form, the members of the religious Society of Friends–especially the young– may be induced to make themselves familiar with its rise, and the severe trials that attended its early progress…”

Charles Evans was born on December 25, 1802 in Philadelphia. He went on to study medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1836, he married Mary Lownes Smith. He was also a very active member of the Society of Friends and wrote often for The Friend journal.

This new edition is dedicated to the readers of the library of the Friends Meeting, Washington D.C.

A Visit to a Gñani: From Adam’s Peak to Elephanta

by Virginia Huntington Robie

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Virginia Huntington Robie was born on October 18, 1868 in Salmon Falls, New Hampshire. She enjoyed the immense benefits of education throughout her childhood, and she went on to attend the School of Decorative Design at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and later the Art Institute in Chicago. Her lifelong focus was researching and writing architecture and art, but she also wrote juvenile fiction, and was a professor of art at Rollins College.

She wrote numerous books, including Historic Styles in Furniture (1904), By-paths in Collecting (1912), Quest of the Quaint (1916), and The New Architectural Development in Florida (1922). Her articles appeared in many journals, such as Country Life, Ladies’ Home Journal, the World Book Encyclopedia, Century Magazine, and International Studio, House and Garden. She was a dedicated, driven person, creating a significant catalog of writings, helping to design Rollins College, and strengthening the connection between the College and its town, Winter Haven, Florida.

This edition is dedicated to Elizabeth Helm of the National Sculpture Society, alert observer and imaginative editor of the scholarship of the arts.

Historic Styles in Furniture

by Virginia Huntington Robie

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Virginia Huntington Robie was born on October 18, 1868 in Salmon Falls, New Hampshire. She enjoyed the immense benefits of education throughout her childhood, and she went on to attend the School of Decorative Design at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and later the Art Institute in Chicago. Her lifelong focus was researching and writing architecture and art, but she also wrote juvenile fiction, and was a professor of art at Rollins College.

She wrote numerous books, including Historic Styles in Furniture (1904), By-paths in Collecting (1912), Quest of the Quaint (1916), and The New Architectural Development in Florida (1922). Her articles appeared in many journals, such as Country Life, Ladies’ Home Journal, the World Book Encyclopedia, Century Magazine, and International Studio, House and Garden. She was a dedicated, driven person, creating a significant catalog of writings, helping to design Rollins College, and strengthening the connection between the College and its town, Winter Haven, Florida.

This edition is dedicated to Elizabeth Helm of the National Sculpture Society, alert observer and imaginative editor of the scholarship of the arts.

The Labour Movement

by Leonard Trelawny Hobhouse

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Leonard Trelawny Hobhouse (September 8, 1864 – June 21, 1929) was a sociologist and political scientist, known as an early and powerful proponent of the “New Liberal” movement in England. He worked as a journalist for a decade, as a secretary for a trade union, and later as a professor of sociology at the University of London.

Hobhouse was strongly influenced by the work of John Stuart Mill, and was agnostic, a feminist, a secularist and described himself as a liberal socialist. He argued that wealth had a social dimension, and was not acquired through individual effort, but rather social organization. He was against imperialism, as he was against the “archaic order of society and older forms of coercion” as well. His sister, Emily Hobhouse was also a feminist, anti-imperialist and was best known for revealing the awful conditions inside British incarceration camps in South Africa, particularly those holding women and children.

The Labour Movement was one of Hobhouse’s first book, published in 1893. He wrote numerous other works, including Democracy and Reaction (1905), The Rational Good: A Study in the Logic of Practice (1921); The Elements of Social Justice (1922).

This new edition is dedicated to Steven Rathgeb Smith, able director of the American Political Science Association.

Ancient Stained and Painted Glass

by Frederick Sydney Eden

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Frederick Sydney Eden (1859-1950) became well known for his significant writings on the subject of stained glass. Previously, he was a lawyer, but had gotten caught up in some fraud regarding an estate, which landed him in jail for six years. However, he covered up his past, and it largely remained secret until his passing.

Eden came to the field of stained glass during his mid-40s, while he was examining Essex churches between 1909-11. He then began volunteer work with the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England (RCHME). His experience as a draughtsman and growing knowledge of stained glass had his colleagues encourage Eden to write a work on the subject. In 1913, he released this work, Ancient Stained and Painted Glass as a result.

This work helped launch Eden’s career in the field. He began researching churches in other parts of England, however, his work was interrupted by World War I when he worked for the Ministry of Munitions. After the war, his career truly blossomed. In 1922, he became an honorary fellow of the British Society of Master Glass Painters, and became known as a major authority on stained glass, well aware of its role in combination with other arts.

This edition is dedicated to Gwen Pier of the National Sculpture Society, sagacious observer of the arts scene and major force in its contributions to our environment.

The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America: Volume II

by John Fiske

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John Fiske was born on March 30, 1842 in Hartford, Connecticut as Edmund Fiske Green. Fiske was raised by his paternal grandmother who enjoyed an excellent education, learning Latin and Greek at a very early age, moving on to other languages as a teen, including Spanish, Hebrew and Sanskrit. He attended law school at Harvard, and opened up a practice in Boston in 1865. He quickly found he preferred teaching, and changed professions, focusing first on promoting the theory of evolution.

Fiske’s writings were praised for being readable and interesting, and the good reception spurred him on to pen many works. In addition to writing for popular publications, such as Atlantic Monthly, he wrote many popular books, including Myths and Mythmakers, The Discovery of America, and books intended for younger audiences, such as The War of Independence. He was a world famous historian, philosopher and educator when he passed away in East Glouchester, Massachusetts on July 4, 1901.

This new edition is dedicated to Lew Taylor, able editor and energetic historian.

The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America: Volume I

by John Fiske

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John Fiske was born on March 30, 1842 in Hartford, Connecticut as Edmund Fiske Green. Fiske was raised by his paternal grandmother who enjoyed an excellent education, learning Latin and Greek at a very early age, moving on to other languages as a teen, including Spanish, Hebrew and Sanskrit. He attended law school at Harvard, and opened up a practice in Boston in 1865. He quickly found he preferred teaching, and changed professions, focusing first on promoting the theory of evolution.

Fiske’s writings were praised for being readable and interesting, and the good reception spurred him on to pen many works. In addition to writing for popular publications, such as Atlantic Monthly, he wrote many popular books, including Myths and Mythmakers, The Discovery of America, and books intended for younger audiences, such as The War of Independence. He was a world famous historian, philosopher and educator when he passed away in East Glouchester, Massachusetts on July 4, 1901.

This new edition is dedicated to Lew Taylor, able editor and energetic historian.

Storia del Grande Oriente d’Italia (Italian Edition)

by Emanuela Locci

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Questo volume è la traduzione italiana di un libro precedente nato con l’intento di colmare una lacuna bibliografica, infatti, fino alla sua pubblicazione non era presente nella letteratura massonica un libro che trattasse in maniera organica la storia della massoneria in Italia, scritto in inglese. Questo volume si proponeva di eliminare questa mancanza e di far conoscere a una parte del mondo, quella che si rifà alla lingua anglosassone, la storia della più importante delle Obbedienze che operano in Italia: il Grande Oriente d’Italia.

Il libro nasce dall’unione delle competenze di giovani ricercatori italiani che si occupano di massoneria e si sono incontrati in occasione del primo seminario promosso dal Centro Ricerche Storiche sulla Libera Muratoria che si è tenuto a Torino nel 2017 e che hanno deciso di mettere il loro sapere e la loro professionalità al servizio della storia e di questo libro.

 

cover image with white text of the book information over an image of the interior of a church

Beat the Drum Ecclesiastic: Gilbert Sheldon and the Settlement of Anglican Orthodoxy

by Heather D. Thornton

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Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury (1663-77) was at the helm during the time the Church of England sought to remake and redefine itself in the aftermath of not only the Civil Wars, Interregnum, but the Restoration Settlement as well. He aided in the preservation of a remnant of the Church of England, supported his king until his execution, and gained a high position in the Church upon its return, which gave him the opportunity to influence the Church to the present day.

This work seeks to highlight Sheldon’s role during this era, and illustrates his powerful influence upon the Church he tirelessly served. Sheldon has often been one figure often overlooked by history and this work seeks to correct that problem. It showcases the importance of his steady hand at the helm of the church in the 17th century that allowed the Church of England to recover and flourish in later centuries.

Author Blurb
Heather D. Thornton received her PhD from Louisiana State University in 2010. She is currently an associate professor with the Department of History at American Public University. This is her first book.

 

Siren of the Heart

by Gad Ben-Meir

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Siren of the Heart is a selection of Ben-Meir’s poems written over the last twelve years celebrating his avid appreciation and colourful insight into love and friendship in all their manifestations, repercussions and, sometimes, conversion into hate or antipathy. His rhymes and free verse illuminate the breadth and depth of such feelings covering, inter alia, the readers’ underlying stratum of their own life experiences. Ben-Meir has cast, with verve and vivacity, his Middle Eastern cultural background into the vibrant and multi-cultural societies of Australia and England where he and his family have lived for close to six decades.

 

Andy Gordon

by Horatio Alger, introduction by Dr. Wallace Boston

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

The Black Tortoise: Being the Strange Story of Old Frick’s Diamond

by Frederick Viller

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Frederick Viller is the nom de plume of Christian Herman Sparre, a Norwegian Commanding Admiral and a member of Parliament. Sparre was born on July 30, 1859 in Norway to a prominent physician father, who also was a member of Parliament. Sparre was a graduate of both the Norwegian Naval Academy and the Norwegian Military Academy. He went on to a distinguished military career, all while serving as a politician, first serving on the Council of State Division in 1900, later being elected to the Norwegian Parliament in 1913.

Sparre also wrote a variety of fiction as well. The Black Tortoise is a detective novel, followed by The Mysterious Ship. The works were translated from the original into English. This particular work was translated by Mrs. H. L. Braekstad.

This new edition is dedicated to Larissa P. Watkins, scholar and librarian extraordinary, guide to Masonry and mystery.

 

Worlds of Print: The Moral Imagination of an Informed Citizenry, 1734 to 1839

by John Slifko

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Plato, Aristotle, Baron Montesquieu, and Jean Jacques Rousseau argued that you could never have a democracy bigger than the geographic size, intimate oral habits, and embodied rituals of face-to-face communication, and walking distance of a Greek city-state, French town, or small Swiss city. However, in the years surrounding the 1776 American War of Independence and accelerating into the 1800s in the American northeast and mid-Atlantic, there was a significant cultural transformation in the transition from oral/aural cultures to an increasingly literate citizenry. A consequence of this transition was an expanded geographical range of democratic engagement. In this book, John Slifko argues that freemasonry was representative and played an important role in this transformation and helped articulate the moral imagination of an informed democratic citizenry via fast emerging worlds of print.

A metamorphosis occurred through worlds of print anchored at home in the routine lives of local community and transmission in space across networks of place. Communication and political participation were enhanced in early America through a growing range of print vehicles such as pamphlets, newspapers, declarations and books of all types concerned with ancient and modern learning. The formation of local civic associations and reading libraries further contributed to this growth of available print documents. This work examines the vital roles that freemasons played in this print transformation.

About the Author:

John Slifko (1950-2018) was an expert in the fields of Freemasonry and Esotericism. He dedicated much of his scholarly and charitable work to studying democratic civil societies.

In 2015, John was awarded the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Geography from University of California, Los Angeles. He completed a joint Bachelor’s degree in Urban Planning and Geography in 1987 from San Francisco State and a Master’s degree in 1989 from University of California, Los Angeles in Urban Planning. John worked as a Planning Deputy for the Los Angeles City Council and as a Legislative Aide Field Representative for the United States Congress.

He was a founding member and served on the Board of Advisors at the Hannah Mather Crocker Society, Notre Dame University. He was also a Founder and co-Director of the Roosevelt Center for the Study of Civil Society and Freemasonry and Project AWE, which is dedicated to exploring connections between Western esotericism and the arts.

John was described by Zhenya Gershman, an Artist and Art Historian, as someone who “had a thirst for knowledge and a striving for improvement of life conditions for others that continues to be contagious. The concept of ‘Moral Imagination’ represented to John a combination of the reverie for artistic creativity with simultaneous responsibility for the world”.

 

The Hope for Perfect People Leaders: Positive Psychology Education to Lead our Future Health, Happiness and Success

by Dr. Lisa Miller

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The Hope for Perfect People Leaders provides a visionary strategic plan to educate and empower our future generations as luminaries of positive psychology. Leaders learn to dedicate themselves to the hope for higher humanism, while also producing prosperity through local and global altruistic reciprocity.

Readers will find a multidisciplinary collaboration from meticulous researchers, bold leaders, compassionate thinkers, eloquent activists, clever humorists, Olympic coaches, and wise discerning diplomats. This work offers a thought provoking mentality capable of improving one’s fundamental motivation toward life experiences. Lessons learned from the reading will inspire increased emotional intelligence, gracefulness in conflict, dedication to loyally serving others, and cultural inclusivity of demographic diversity and neurodiversity.

Dr. Lisa Miller, Professor of Health Sciences at American Military University, contributed 20 years of expertise on innovative collaborations in research, teaching, and service to develop our hope for altruistic leaders who will improve mental, physical, and spiritual health in higher education. Dr. Miller completed a Doctorate from The Ohio State University with interdisciplinary specializations in Higher Education and Student Affairs, Counseling and Sport Psychology, Research Methods for Human Development, and Sport and Exercise Management. She earned a Master of Human Resources from the Fisher College of Business along with a Graduate Concentration from Harvard University in Education and Religious Studies in addition to a Bachelor of Science in the Psychology Honors Program from Wright State University as a tennis scholar athlete. In her spare time, Dr. Miller enjoys discussing noble international projects, traveling internationally, teaching tennis, strolling through campuses, and helping others with positive psychology skills to proactively improve mental health.

 

The Peerless Cook Book: With Recipes for the Chafing Dish

by Mary J. Lincoln

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Mary Johnson Bailey Lincoln was born on July 8, 1844 in South Attleboro, Massachusetts. At the mere age of seven, her father died. She was able to attend school, graduating in 1864 from the Wheaton Female Seminary, now today known as Wheaton College. She married and became a housewife, but due to her husband’s failing health, she began teaching at the Boston Cooking School in the Spring of 1879. At first she declined the position, not thinking she was qualified, but after some instruction she took on the role and it grew immensely with her. Aside from organizing and teaching a variety of classes, she wrote Mrs. Lincoln’s Boston Cook Book: What to Do and What Not to Do in Cooking. Her cook book was highly detailed and considered scientific for including information on chemistry and food composition. It set the standard for cook books.

The Peerless Cook Book, first published in 1886, was her second published book. She also wrote a textbook for cooking, Boston School Kitchen Textbook: Lessons in Cooking for the Use of Classes in Public and Industrial Schools, which was published the following year. She thoroughly enjoyed teaching and writing, and published several articles in various magazines, she taught at Lasell Seminary, was a member of the New England Woman’s Press Association, served as editor and advisor on various publications and much more, including owning her own company, Mrs. Lincoln’s Baking Powder Company of Boston. Her work can be found under the name, Mrs. D.A. Lincoln, until 1894 when her husband, David A. Lincoln, passed away. Afterwards, she went by Mary J. Lincoln. She passed away on December 2, 1921.

This edition is dedicated to Elizabeth Helm in hopes she finds it handy.

 

Dan, The Newsboy

by Horatio Alger, introduction by Dr. Wallace Boston

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

Russia: A Study

by A. N. Drew

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A. N. Drew spent over twenty-five years doing business in Russia, and picked up the language over time. This work is an attempt at interpreting Russian life, which is the first portion of the book. In it, Drew highlights political issues in chapters such as “Character,” “Morality,” and “Education.” Drew also spends time analyzing issues of religion and nationality in Russia, including anti-Semitic violence and anti-German sentiments.

Due to his interest and specialty, Drew spends the latter portion of the book on issues of Russian industry, both on natural resources, as well as taxation and business development. Published at the end of World War I, it offers an illuminating look at concerns of a rapidly shifting global political landscape.

This new edition is dedicated to the scholars of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, custodians of much of Russian history.

 

The Remains of William Penn: Pennsylvania’s Plea, the Mission to England, Visit to the Grave, Letters, Etc

by George L. Harrison

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William Penn was born in London, England, on October 14, 1644, and would become many things, including a father, husband, legal and religious figure. He is most well known for founding the state of Pennsylvania. Penn was born into a family of wealth and political power, and as such, he enjoyed quality schooling, including attending Christ Church College, now University of Oxford, in 1660. However, he was expelled for criticizing the Church of England. During the 1660s, Penn met some members of the Society of Friends while in Ireland, and he eventually converted to the religion. He was jailed for blasphemy his 1668 work, The Sandy Foundation Shaken. Undeterred, and even more committed to his faith, he wrote No Cross, No Crown. He married fellow Quaker, Gulielma Maria Springett, and together they had three children. In 1681, Penn petitioned King Charles II for a charter to found Pennsylvania, which he hoped to develop as a place tolerant of all religions, and to have peaceful relationships with the numerous Native American tribes inhabiting the area.

Penn lived in and out of Pennsylvania after founding it, but returned to England after 1701, and ultimately passed away in Berkshire, England, on July 30, 1718. His health had been failing after he suffered a stroke in 1712. His second wife, Hannah Callowhill, largely ran the colony.

This edition is dedicated to the library readers of the Friends Meeting in Washington, D.C.

 

The Life And Works Of Charles Lamb: The Essays Of Elia

by Charles Lamb

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Charles Lamb (1775 – 1834) was a popular English author of works for both adults and children. His siblings were fairly spread out in age, so his elder sister Mary, 11 years older, became his closest friend. She taught him to read and would later author books with Charles. Lamb was educated throughout his life, enjoying a lifelong friendship with his first schoolmistress, Mrs. Reynolds. He went on to attend such institutions as Christ’s Hospital, a boarding school. Lamb was considered to be very popular and well-liked, however, he had a speech impediment, and it was this stuttering that kept him out of going onto college. Instead, Lamb worked as a clerk in several offices, eventually remaining with the British East India Company.

Lamb also took care of his sister Mary after she killed her mother in a fit of madness. Rather than allow her to remain imprisoned for life, Lamb worked to ensure she had been cared for in an asylum, and then was allowed to return home and live with Lamb. Despite a few attempts to court women to marriage, he was unsuccessful, and remained a lifelong bachelor. He and his sister enjoyed a fruitful social life, participating in many English salons. Lamb enjoyed success as a writer, particularly with his prose works, and his famous, Essays of Elia series, and the children’s work, Tales from Shakespeare that was written with his sister.

This new edition is dedicated to Peter Dozal, with best wishes for his studies.

 

The Soul of a People

by H. Fielding Hall

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The Soul of a People was originally released in 1898. Written by Harold Fielding Hall, a British official sent to Burma (now Myanmar) to take part in the Burma Commission. Hall lived for many years in Burma, and wrote this account of the places, people and of Buddhism as he encountered it during his travels.

Through his understanding on Burmese Buddhism, he uses it to relate to other Burmese customs and laws, on everything from marriage, festivals, criminal justice, gender roles, and the high value placed on life in all forms found within nature. Hall writes as a liberal Christian seeking to learn more about Buddhism, and he endeavors to describe religious tenants, as well as folklore and other local beliefs and customs. This work gives a great glimpse of life in Burma during the late 1800s, while also illustrating the perils of colonialism.

This new edition is dedicated to Hera Tun Oo, energetic traveler and probing scholar.