The Occult Arts: An Examination of the Claims Made for the Existence of Supernormal Powers

by J. W. Frings

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J.W. Fring opens by noting he is skeptical of any claims of the supernatural. He defines supernatural broadly, and dedicates chapters to a variety of manifestations, including alchemy, telepathy, palmistry, and hypnotism. Fring chooses to highlight multiple versions of the supernatural, broadly defining, it, and then offers some points to challenge beliefs in these manifestations. Those who are intrigued about the continuing belief in things strange will find this work both useful and controversial.

 

The Huguenots in France: After the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes with Memoirs of Distinguished Huguenot Refugees, and A Visit to the Country of Voudois

by Samuel Smiles

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The Huguenots are French Protestants, a denomination that began during the early sixteenth century. Their place in French society oscillated between their being celebrated and defamed. On August 24, 1572, while marking Saint Bartholomew’s Day, thousands of Huguenots were massacred. After decades of fighting occurred, a guarantee of peace was issued, which largely remained in place until October 18, 1685 when Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes. Many Huguenots fled France to escape persecution, and settled in various places, such as the United States, England, Sweden, Denmark, and Switzerland.

Samuel Smiles (1812 – 1904), was a Scottish social reformer, parliamentarian, and prolific author. He promoted frugality and asserted that poverty was caused largely by irresponsible habits, which may help account for his admiration of the Huguenot culture of industry and entrepreneurship.

 

The Bahai Movement: A Series of Nineteen Papers

by Charles Mason Remey

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Charles Mason Remey (1874-1974) was the son of Admiral George Collier Remey and grew up in Washington DC, at 1527 New Hampshire Avenue NW, which is now the home of Westphalia Press and the Policy Studies Organization, and the American Political Science Association.. He drew detailed plans and did a survey of the house, which are deposited in the Library of Congress. He studied to be an architect at Cornell (1893-1896) and the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris (1896-1903), where he learned about the Baha’i faith, and quickly adopted it.

In 1903, Remey returned to Washington, DC, and wrote numerous works on Baha’i theology and practices. He spent much of his time traveling to teach and discuss the Baha’i faith, and at the same time developing architectural plans, with the occasional class taught at George Washington University. Remey wrote extensively, and his papers are held at the National Baha’i Archives, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, Princeton University, Yale University, and the Iowa Historical Society.

This new edition is dedicated to Professor Steven Smith, whose patient efforts to make historic 1527 New Hampshire safe for future generations deserve thanks and recognition.

 

 

A Series of Twelve Articles Introductory to the Study of the Baha’i Teachings

by Charles Mason Remey

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Charles Mason Remey (1874-1974) was the son of Admiral George Collier Remey and grew up in Washington DC, at 1527 New Hampshire Avenue NW, which is now the headquarters of Westphalia Press and the Policy Studies Organization. He drew plans and did a survey of the house, which are deposited in the Library of Congress. He studied to be an architect at Cornell (1893-1896) and the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris (1896-1903) where he learned about the Baha’i faith, and quickly adopted it.

In 1903, Remey returned to Washington, DC, and wrote numerous works on the Baha’i faith. He spent the majority of his time traveling to teach and discuss the Baha’i faith, and developing architectural plans, with the occasional class taught at George Washington University. Remey wrote extensively, and his papers are held at the National Baha’i Archives, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, Princeton University, Yale University, and the Iowa Historical Society.

 

The Great Indian Religions: Being a Popular Account of Brahmanism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Zoroastrianism

by G. T. Bettany

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G. T. (George Thomas) Bettany (1850-1891) was born and educated in England, attending Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge University, studying medicine and the natural sciences. He also attended London University in 1871, taking a degree in geology, and later receiving an MA six years later. He lectured on biology, and botany. Bettany wrote numerous works of history on various subjects, including A Biographical History of Guy’s Hospital (1892), Life of Charles Darwin (1887), and A Sketch of the History of Judaism and Christianity in the Light of Modern Research and Criticism (1892). He also was the English editor of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. He died of heart disease at the age of 41.

 

 

The Old Spanish Missions of California: A Historical and Descriptive Sketch

by Paul Elder

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There were twenty one Spanish missions in California, established between 1769 and 1833 by Catholic priests to spread Christianity. Paul Elder collected various snippets of California history and compiled it in this work with quotes from various primary sources and photographs of numerous missions across the state, which presents a romanticized view of their founding. This work only portrays a partial and sanitized tale of the Spanish missions in California and their impact. The missions relied on agriculture to fund themselves, and sought to convert and colonize the Native people and their land. Multiple rebellions against the missions occurred since the missionaries sought to destroy native culture, and in the process, they transmitted communicable diseases which killed thousands. Missions did not just exist in California, but also Texas, Arizona, New Mexico and Florida.

 

Story of the Huguenots: A Sixteenth Century Narrative Wherein the French, Spaniards and Indians Were the Actors

by F. A. Mann

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The Huguenots are French Protestants, a product of turmoil during the early sixteenth century. The Huguenot community oscillated between celebration and persecution in France. On August 24, 1572, while celebrating Saint Bartholomew’s Day, thousands of Huguenots were massacred. After decades of fighting occurred, an edict of peace was issued, which largely remained in place until October 18, 1685 when Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes. Many Huguenots fled France,  then, or before, to escape persecution. Some came to the United States, with the majority deciding to reside in Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and South Carolina. Others settled in England, Sweden, Denmark, and Switzerland. This work offers an interesting account of the Huguenots in Florida and their interactions with the local populace.

This edition is dedicated to Sam Hier, who knows about communities in strife.