Spiritualism: A Popular History from 1847

by Joseph Martin McCabe

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Joseph Martin McCabe was born on November 12, 1867. At the age of 15 he began training in the Franciscan order, and in 1890 was ordained. He was praised for his excellent scholarly work, especially in philosophy and was selected to study at the Catholic University of Louvain. By February 1896, he left the priesthood after losing his faith. Of his experience, McCabe wrote From Rome to Rationalism, published in 1897, and later the expanded version, Twelve Years in a Monastery.

McCabe was a truly prolific writer, publishing over 250 works. He became a secretary of the Leicester Secular Society, a founding board member in 1899 of the Rationalist Press Association, a member of the South Place Ethical Society, the National Secular Society, an advocate of women’s rights, associated with the Rationalist Association, and much more throughout his life.

McCabe was extremely critical of the spiritualism movement. Among other confrontations, in 1920 McCabe debated the famous author Arthur Conan Doyle, a spiritualist advocate. This work is a collection of arguments against spiritualism, and debunks many of its popular claims. McCabe felt spiritualism was a collection of tricks.

The new edition of this volume is dedicated to those scholars and scientists studying the perplexing history of spiritualism.

Friends in the Seventeenth Century

by Charles Evans

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When introducing his work, Charles Evans wrote the following,
“The motive that has prompted the preparation of the present work, has been the hope that, by thus bringing the substance of the principal parts of the narratives of other writers into a more condensed form, the members of the religious Society of Friends–especially the young– may be induced to make themselves familiar with its rise, and the severe trials that attended its early progress…”

Charles Evans was born on December 25, 1802 in Philadelphia. He went on to study medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1836, he married Mary Lownes Smith. He was also a very active member of the Society of Friends and wrote often for The Friend journal.

This new edition is dedicated to the readers of the library of the Friends Meeting, Washington D.C.

A Visit to a Gñani: From Adam’s Peak to Elephanta

by Virginia Huntington Robie

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Virginia Huntington Robie was born on October 18, 1868 in Salmon Falls, New Hampshire. She enjoyed the immense benefits of education throughout her childhood, and she went on to attend the School of Decorative Design at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and later the Art Institute in Chicago. Her lifelong focus was researching and writing architecture and art, but she also wrote juvenile fiction, and was a professor of art at Rollins College.

She wrote numerous books, including Historic Styles in Furniture (1904), By-paths in Collecting (1912), Quest of the Quaint (1916), and The New Architectural Development in Florida (1922). Her articles appeared in many journals, such as Country Life, Ladies’ Home Journal, the World Book Encyclopedia, Century Magazine, and International Studio, House and Garden. She was a dedicated, driven person, creating a significant catalog of writings, helping to design Rollins College, and strengthening the connection between the College and its town, Winter Haven, Florida.

This edition is dedicated to Elizabeth Helm of the National Sculpture Society, alert observer and imaginative editor of the scholarship of the arts.

Ancient Stained and Painted Glass

by Frederick Sydney Eden

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Frederick Sydney Eden (1859-1950) became well known for his significant writings on the subject of stained glass. Previously, he was a lawyer, but had gotten caught up in some fraud regarding an estate, which landed him in jail for six years. However, he covered up his past, and it largely remained secret until his passing.

Eden came to the field of stained glass during his mid-40s, while he was examining Essex churches between 1909-11. He then began volunteer work with the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England (RCHME). His experience as a draughtsman and growing knowledge of stained glass had his colleagues encourage Eden to write a work on the subject. In 1913, he released this work, Ancient Stained and Painted Glass as a result.

This work helped launch Eden’s career in the field. He began researching churches in other parts of England, however, his work was interrupted by World War I when he worked for the Ministry of Munitions. After the war, his career truly blossomed. In 1922, he became an honorary fellow of the British Society of Master Glass Painters, and became known as a major authority on stained glass, well aware of its role in combination with other arts.

This edition is dedicated to Gwen Pier of the National Sculpture Society, sagacious observer of the arts scene and major force in its contributions to our environment.

The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America: Volume II

by John Fiske

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John Fiske was born on March 30, 1842 in Hartford, Connecticut as Edmund Fiske Green. Fiske was raised by his paternal grandmother who enjoyed an excellent education, learning Latin and Greek at a very early age, moving on to other languages as a teen, including Spanish, Hebrew and Sanskrit. He attended law school at Harvard, and opened up a practice in Boston in 1865. He quickly found he preferred teaching, and changed professions, focusing first on promoting the theory of evolution.

Fiske’s writings were praised for being readable and interesting, and the good reception spurred him on to pen many works. In addition to writing for popular publications, such as Atlantic Monthly, he wrote many popular books, including Myths and Mythmakers, The Discovery of America, and books intended for younger audiences, such as The War of Independence. He was a world famous historian, philosopher and educator when he passed away in East Glouchester, Massachusetts on July 4, 1901.

This new edition is dedicated to Lew Taylor, able editor and energetic historian.

The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America: Volume I

by John Fiske

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John Fiske was born on March 30, 1842 in Hartford, Connecticut as Edmund Fiske Green. Fiske was raised by his paternal grandmother who enjoyed an excellent education, learning Latin and Greek at a very early age, moving on to other languages as a teen, including Spanish, Hebrew and Sanskrit. He attended law school at Harvard, and opened up a practice in Boston in 1865. He quickly found he preferred teaching, and changed professions, focusing first on promoting the theory of evolution.

Fiske’s writings were praised for being readable and interesting, and the good reception spurred him on to pen many works. In addition to writing for popular publications, such as Atlantic Monthly, he wrote many popular books, including Myths and Mythmakers, The Discovery of America, and books intended for younger audiences, such as The War of Independence. He was a world famous historian, philosopher and educator when he passed away in East Glouchester, Massachusetts on July 4, 1901.

This new edition is dedicated to Lew Taylor, able editor and energetic historian.

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Beat the Drum Ecclesiastic: Gilbert Sheldon and the Settlement of Anglican Orthodoxy

by Heather D. Thornton

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Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury (1663-77) was at the helm during the time the Church of England sought to remake and redefine itself in the aftermath of not only the Civil Wars, Interregnum, but the Restoration Settlement as well. He aided in the preservation of a remnant of the Church of England, supported his king until his execution, and gained a high position in the Church upon its return, which gave him the opportunity to influence the Church to the present day.

This work seeks to highlight Sheldon’s role during this era, and illustrates his powerful influence upon the Church he tirelessly served. Sheldon has often been one figure often overlooked by history and this work seeks to correct that problem. It showcases the importance of his steady hand at the helm of the church in the 17th century that allowed the Church of England to recover and flourish in later centuries.

Author Blurb
Heather D. Thornton received her PhD from Louisiana State University in 2010. She is currently an associate professor with the Department of History at American Public University. This is her first book.

 

The Remains of William Penn: Pennsylvania’s Plea, the Mission to England, Visit to the Grave, Letters, Etc

by George L. Harrison

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William Penn was born in London, England, on October 14, 1644, and would become many things, including a father, husband, legal and religious figure. He is most well known for founding the state of Pennsylvania. Penn was born into a family of wealth and political power, and as such, he enjoyed quality schooling, including attending Christ Church College, now University of Oxford, in 1660. However, he was expelled for criticizing the Church of England. During the 1660s, Penn met some members of the Society of Friends while in Ireland, and he eventually converted to the religion. He was jailed for blasphemy his 1668 work, The Sandy Foundation Shaken. Undeterred, and even more committed to his faith, he wrote No Cross, No Crown. He married fellow Quaker, Gulielma Maria Springett, and together they had three children. In 1681, Penn petitioned King Charles II for a charter to found Pennsylvania, which he hoped to develop as a place tolerant of all religions, and to have peaceful relationships with the numerous Native American tribes inhabiting the area.

Penn lived in and out of Pennsylvania after founding it, but returned to England after 1701, and ultimately passed away in Berkshire, England, on July 30, 1718. His health had been failing after he suffered a stroke in 1712. His second wife, Hannah Callowhill, largely ran the colony.

This edition is dedicated to the library readers of the Friends Meeting in Washington, D.C.

 

The Soul of a People

by H. Fielding Hall

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The Soul of a People was originally released in 1898. Written by Harold Fielding Hall, a British official sent to Burma (now Myanmar) to take part in the Burma Commission. Hall lived for many years in Burma, and wrote this account of the places, people and of Buddhism as he encountered it during his travels.

Through his understanding on Burmese Buddhism, he uses it to relate to other Burmese customs and laws, on everything from marriage, festivals, criminal justice, gender roles, and the high value placed on life in all forms found within nature. Hall writes as a liberal Christian seeking to learn more about Buddhism, and he endeavors to describe religious tenants, as well as folklore and other local beliefs and customs. This work gives a great glimpse of life in Burma during the late 1800s, while also illustrating the perils of colonialism.

This new edition is dedicated to Hera Tun Oo, energetic traveler and probing scholar.

 

Masonry and Protestantism

by Susanna Hopkins Mason

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.John J. Lanier was a self-described, Masonic Lecturer, and author of numerous books on Masonic culture, including The Master Mason, Masonry and Citizenship, and Washington, the Great American Mason.

 

Transylvania in 1922: Report of the Commission Sent by the American and British Unitarian Churches to Transylvania in 1922

by Louis C. Cornish

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In 1922, a joint commission of US and UK Unitarian Churches traveled to Transylvania after concerns over religions persecution arose in a prior visit in 1920. The Commission was gladdened to see an increase in liberty, but upset to discover that the Romanian government was not wholly supportive of not just Unitarians, but other religious organizations, such as the Roman Catholics, Presbyterians, and Lutherans. Namely, they were upset that endowments and land for these religious institutions was being taken back.

In this work, Louis C. Cornish has compiled an interesting look at Transylvania during this time period. He concludes with a plea to support a Unitarian Mission House in Budapest, which, at the time, had over six thousand Unitarians, and a single church with a seating capacity of 250 to support them.

 

 

The Durable Satisfactions of Life

by Charles William Eliot

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Born into a wealthy Boston family, Eliot was fortunate enough to concentrate on his studies and have the ability to attend Boston Latin School, and then later graduate from Harvard University in 1853. However, after the Panic of 1857, Eliot’s family lost much of its wealth. Eliot decided to visit various schools across Europe and study educational systems after being passed over for a professorship.After close to two years abroad, Eliot returned home and enjoyed an appointment at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Eliot remained interested in improving the educational system in the US, which was not seen as offering particularly useful knowledge to an industrializing country. His sentiments were shared by much of the public, and he wrote a well-received article in The Atlantic Monthly about his visions for a reformed educational system. In 1969, after the publication of the article, Eliot would be selected as the president of Harvard.

Eliot, despite trying to remove football from the school, was a popular president, enough so to have served 40 years. He modernized the curriculum, introduced standardized exams, expanded the facilities, and changed the way educational institutions funded themselves. The Durable Satisfactions of Life is a collection of essays and addresses given by Eliot which often reflect on his ethical and religious views of life.

This new edition is dedicated to Arthur Shurcliff.

 

 

 

Early Quaker Education in Pennsylvania

by Thomas Woody PhD

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Born on September 3, 1891, in Thorntown, Indiana, to a Quaker family. Woody would remain in Indiana for his B.A., which he obtained from Indiana University. Later he could go on to earn his PhD in 1918 from Columbia University. Woody wrote a great deal about Quakers, formally known as the Religious Society of Friends, but later focused strongly on education. In addition to “Early Quaker Education in Pennsylvania,” 1920, he also wrote “Quaker Education in the Colony and State of New Jersey” published in 1923. In 1929, he was an awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to study political education on Russian citizens. Woody was interested in and researched learning processes across a variety of people and places. One of his most famous works is A History of Women’s Education in the United States, published in 1929.

This new edition is dedicated to the Friends Meeting in Washington D.C. and its library.

 

 

 

The London Friends’ Meetings

by William Beck and Thomas Frederick Ball

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The London Friends’ Meetings is a significant expansion on a lecture given by William Beck in 1856, “The London Friends’ Meeting-houses and Their Associations.” Co-author, Thomas Frederick Ball spent a great time doing research in minute-books and other holdings of the Friends in London. The records offer a look at the very long history of the Friends, offering primary sources prior to 1740, and up to 1869.

In this work, Beck and Ball offer both depth and breadth, and offers a look at London’s history, and how it impacted the development of the Friends. The research into the holdings of various groups gives an overview of religious and interpersonal relationships as they developed within different Friends congregations.

 

 

 

 

Old Quaker Meeting-Houses

by John Russell Hayes

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John Russell Hayes (1866-1945) was a Quaker educator, poet, and worked as a librarian for Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania. He was born in 1866, to William and Rachel Hayes, a family of Quaker farmers. Hayes spent much of his time on his family’s farm, which was located near the Brandywine River. He attended Swarthmore College, graduating in 1888. A few years later, he married his wife, Emma Gawthrop, in 1892, who also had attended and graduated from Swarthmore the same year. Afterwards, he went on to attend the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania, then Harvard, Oxford, and the University of Strassburg, in Germany.However, Hayes’ loves were literature and his hometown, so he returned to Swarthmore College to teach literature, but then went on to become the college Librarian from 1906-1935. While working at Swarthmore College, Hayes wrote numerous books, often about Quakerism, or of poetry. He and his wife had three daughters, who all also went on to graduate from Swarthmore College. Hayes died Dec. 29, 1945. His papers are held at the Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College. The collection contains letters received by Hayes, various diaries, and other papers owned by Haynes.This edition is dedicated to Friends Meeting of Washington DC, which, since 1807, has been such a force for good in the capital.

 

 

 

 

The Mad Monk of Russia, Iliodor: Life, Memoirs, and Confessions of Sergei Michailovich Trufanoff

by Sergei Michailovich Trufanov

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Sergei Michailovich Trufanov, also known as Hieromonk Iliodor, was born on October 19, 1880 in a small village near the Don River. Despite crushing poverty, which claimed several of his siblings, Trufanov was able to attend several years of school and then entered the local seminary. He went on to attend and graduate the St. Petersburg Theological Academy in 1905. Shortly after, he gave several sermons that attacked a variety of people and organizations, including politicians, aristocrats, revolutionaries, Jews, nationalists, and more. Soon after he apparently blackmailed Rasputin. He later apologized for his slander of Jewish people, then renounced the Russian Orthodox Church, and ultimately was defrocked.

After being banned from several monasteries, he fled to what is currently Norway. He continued to plot against Rasputin, starred as himself in a silent film, The Fall of the Romanovs in 1917, and then returned to Russia in 1918. A few years later, he moved to New York City and lived a relatively quiet life with his family while working as a janitor until his death on January 28, 1952. This story focuses on his earlier life, a time when one critic deemed him, “extravagantly psychopathic.”

 

Discourses and Poems of William Newell, Minister of the First Parish in Cambridge: A Memorial Volume

by William Newell

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On February 25, 1804, William Newell was born in Littleton, Massachusetts. He graduated from Boston Latin School in 1818, and then earned an AB from Harvard in 1824 and an AM in 1827. Two years later, he graduated from Harvard Divinity School. He was well regarded, and quickly found a post as in 1830, he began working at First Parish in Cambridge. He was ordained on May 19, 1830. He was able to unify the divided congregation, and ended up leading the church until he retired on March 31, 1868. He died on October 28, 1881.This new edition is dedicated to the members of the First Parish Unitarian, across from Harvard Yard these many centuries.

 

 

Quaker Women, 1650-1690

by Mabel Richmond Brailsford

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Mabel Richmond Brailsford was not a Friend, but this work is considered to be truthful, extremely well researched, and also sympathetic. Brailsford did extensive research at the Library at Devonshire House in order to complete the portraits of numerous Quaker women, such as Margaret Fell, Barbara Blaugdone, Elizabeth Hooton, Elizabeth Fletcher, Jane Stuart, and Mary Fisher. The biographies paint a picture of the power that women held within the Quaker community, as opposed to other religious denominations at the time. It also offers a lot of information on the individual travels, writings, experiences, and also systemic failures that each of these women faced. Some have argued this is as much an adventure story as it is a set of biographies. She gives an excellent early history of both Quakers and England between 1650-1690.

Brailsford wrote a great deal, including other works on Quakers, such as The Making of William Penn (1930). She often focused on religions and figures within those movements, such as Susanna Wesley, the mother of Methodism, A Quaker from Cromwell’s army: James Nayler, and A Tale of Two Brothers: John and Charles Wesley.

 

 

 

The Quaker of the Future Time

by George A. Walton

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The William Penn Lectures were put together by the Young Friends Movement of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. George A. Walton was a member of the organization, and gave this lecture. In it, among other principles, he discusses the impact labor has on the current world. He advocates for living faith in one’s work, and to ensure that it has meaning and value to both the material and the spiritual realms. Walton gave this speech in 1916 and was responding to many changes in society at the time, although his work still resonates today. George A. Walton was born in 1883. He went on to become the headmaster of the George School in 1912, a Quaker boarding school, where he served until 1948. In 1969, Walton passed away. His papers are held by Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College.

 

 

 

 

Unitarian Affirmations: Seven Discourses Given in Washington, D.C.

by Seven Unitarian Ministers

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Unitarianism is a theological movement which at its start proclaimed that God is a singular entity, rather than a trinity. It rejects other tenants common in Christianity, such as the concept of original sin and the Bible as infallible. The belief emerged during the 1600s and spread quickly through Europe and the United States, particularly among the educated and wealthy classes. One of the earliest places it arrived in the United States was in New England. These lectures were originally given during the late 1890s, and focus on a variety of theological debates, such as the Bible, the Church, and the afterlife.

 

 

 

 

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Discourses and Reviews Upon Questions in Controversial Theology and Practical Religion

by Orville Dewey

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Orville Dewey was born in Sheffield, Massachusetts on March 28, 1794. He spent his time in school and also working on his family’s farm. His household was strongly Calvinist, due to his mother. Both intelligent and studious, Dewey excelled in school, graduating from Williams College, and then later attended Andover Theological Seminary. He went on to become a Unitarian pastor, working within the community of New Bedford for over a decade.Dewey spent much of his later life between Europe and the United States. As he was in ill health, he sought cure and relaxation in Europe. When he returned to the United States, he would come in and out of retirement, either serving various religious posts, or working on his farm. He spent is time out of retirement in New England, New York, and also two years in Washington. He passed away on March 21, 1882. His papers are held in the Andover-Harvard Theological Library at Harvard Divinity School.

 

 

 

 

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Oriental Mysticism: A Treatise on Sufiistic and Unitarian Theosophy of the Persians

by Edward Henry Palmer

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Edward Henry Palmer put together this work that was based on a Persian manuscript, Maksad i Aksá by Azíz bin Mohammed Nafasí. The work sheds some light on Sufis, a Islamic mysticism, which is often characterized as offering the internalization and intensification of Islamic faith.As a child, Palmer enjoyed the benefit of a private teacher, although he was sadly orphaned at a young age. He began a job as a clerk, but his love was always for learning languages and different cultures. He learned Romani culture and language, and then went on to learn French and Italian. Influenced by Sayyid Abdallah, a professor at Cambridge, and a new lease on life, having successfully recovered from tuberculosis, Palmer went on to study at St. John’s College in 1863. Later, he worked on Persian, Turkish, and Arabic manuscripts held by the university. Afterwards, he was asked to join a survey of the Middle East, including Sinai. He returned, wrote about the experience, married, sadly became widowed, became a professor, left and became writing for the Standard. In 1882, an opportunity came up to join an Egyptian expedition. Unfortunately, Palmer and his group were ambushed and murdered.

 

 

 

 

From the Heart of Israel: Jewish Tales and Types

by Rabbi Dr. Bernard Drachman

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Rabbi Dr. Bernard Drachman was born on June 27, 1861 in New York City. He received his early education at High School, Jersey City, NJ, and the Hebrew Preparatory School before going on to earn his B.A from Columbia College. Afterwards, he earned his rabbinic ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau, thanks to a scholarship. He also earned a Ph.D from the University of Heidelberg. As an American born rabbi, it was difficult for him to find a position in an Orthodox synagogue. However, he was dedicated and extremely knowledgeable and found his way to serve. He officiated as rabbi to the Oheb Sholom congregation in Newark from 1885-87, then the Congregation Beth Israel Bikkur Cholim in New York city from 1887-89, and later to that of the congregation Zichron Ephraim. He also served as a professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary.

 

 

 

 

Our Quaker Friends of Ye Olden Time: Being in part a transcript of the minute books of Cedar Creek meeting, Hanover County, and the South River Meeting, Campbell County, Va

by James Pinkney Pleasant Bell

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Publisher James Bell was moved to print these various meeting notes and announcements since his mother’s family were members of the Society of Friends. As Bell states,

“…sometimes in my early childhood I attended their meetings for worship, held in the old Meetinghouse at Golansville, in Caroline County, Va., and still retaining a love for tliese good people, I have for some time past contemplated publishing a book giving an account of their religious belief, and manner of conducting their meetings.Through a member of the Society of Friends, in Richmond, Va., I have obtained extracts from some of their old Minute books, which I hope will be of interest to my readers; I also make extracts from The Southern Friend (a religious journal published in Richmond during the Civil War)…The Friends not only liberated their own slaves, but also used every effort for the abolition of slavery. They did not allow their members to hire a slave, or take the position of overseer of slaves. The Quakers in North Carolina and Virginia were at one time a large body, but the bitter feeling against them, because of their anti-slavery views caused them to seek homes in the free States, and soon many of the meetings were so depleted that they had to be “laid down.” Doubtless many of my readers in the Western States will say, as they read these pages, “Yes, my ancestors came from Virginia.”

Bell’s collection of information sheds light on religious history in the United States, the impact of the Civil War, and how various Christian denominations used their beliefs to fight against or support the inhumane practice of slavery.

 

 

 

Old and New Unitarian Belief

by John White Chadwick

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Born in 1840, John White Chadwick was initially to become a shoemaker. Although he was in the middle of an apprenticeship, he preferred to continue a non-trade education. During his education at normal school in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, he determined his calling in life was to become a minister. He went on to graduate from Harvard Divinity School in 1864.

Almost immediately after he graduated, he became the pastor of the Second Unitarian Church, in Brooklyn, New York. He wrote a great deal, both books and contributions to journals, including Origin and Destiny (1883), Preacher and Reformer (1900), and Later Poems (1905).

 

Unitarianism: Its Origin and History: A Course of Sixteen Lectures Delivered in Channing Hall, Boston, 1888-9

by American Unitarian Association

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Unitarianism is a theological movement which at its start proclaimed that God is a singular entity, rather than a trinity. It rejects other tenants common in Christianity, such as the concept of original sin and the Bible as infallible. The belief emerged during the 1600s and spread quickly through Europe and the United States, particularly among the educated and wealthy classes. One of the earliest places it arrived in the United States was in New England. These lectures are some of the early writings in Unitarian history in the United States and give a deeper understanding of the faith, especially as it grew within the developing nation.

 

Mashrak-el-Azkar: Descriptive of the Bahai Temple and Illustrative of an Exhibition of Preliminary Designs for the First Mashrak-el-Azkar to be Built in America

by Charles Mason Remey

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Charles Mason Remey (1874-1974) was the son of Admiral George Collier Remey and grew up in Washington DC, at 1527 New Hampshire Ave NW, which is now the home of Westphalia Press, the Policy Studies Organization, and of the American Political Science Association. He drew detailed plans and did a survey of the house, which are deposited in the Library of Congress. He studied to be an architect at Cornell (1893-1896) and the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris (1896-1903), where he learned about the Baha’i faith, and quickly adopted it.

In 1903, Remey returned to Washington, DC, and wrote numerous works on Baha’i theology and practices. He spent much of his time traveling to teach and discuss the Baha’i faith, and at the same time developing architectural plans, with the occasional class taught at George Washington University. Remey wrote extensively, and his papers are held at the National Baha’i Archives, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, Princeton University, Yale University, and the Iowa Historical Society.

 

Catholic Problems in Western Canada

by George Thomas Daly, Preface by Most Reverend O. E. Mathieu

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George Thomas Daly was a Catholic leader who worked in Eastern Canada, but was asked to relocate to Western Canada to spread the religion. In this work, he discusses the desire to spread Catholicism westward across the country, and the complexities of Canada, the changing politics and dynamics of the world, advancing modernity, and what Canadian identity means. Among other things, Daly was very concerned about the spread of Bolshevism.

Daly focuses on the The Catholic Church Extension Society and its attempts to spread Catholicism, particularly in isolated areas. This work discusses Canadianization and how to intertwine a Catholic identity. Daly claims that people can unite regardless of their race or ethnicity, but does not acknowledge the harmful practices that missionizing has on erasing identity and culture. The work is significant in understanding Catholicism in Canada, and the development of the country.

This edition is dedicated to Judy Rich Lauder.

 

Checkered Life: In the Old and New World

by Rev. J. L. Ver Mehr

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When J. L Ver Mehr, also known as Jean Leonhard Henri Corneille Ver Mehr, passed away in 1886. The following served as his obituary:

A Brief Sketch of the Life of a Pioneer Clergyman
Rev. Dr. J. L. Ver Mehr, of whose death brief mention was made in yesterday’s papers, was one of the first clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal Church to arrive here. He came by way of Cape Horn, reaching San Francisco in September, 1849. He preached his first sermon in California in the house of a Mr. Merrill, in this city, on the 10th of that month. A chapel was next built before the close of that year at the corner of Powell and John streets and was opened for divine service on December 30th. This was the first Grace Church, the building being 20×60 feet, and costing $8,000. In April, 1850, Dr. Ver Mehr organized Grace Parish, he being the first rector, with David 8. Tamer and E. Bryant as wardens. He preached the first sermon in a new edifice on Powell street in the Summer of 1851. He resigned the rectorship on February 25, 1854, where it was assumed by Bishop Kip, who had arrived one month before that date. Dr. Ver Mehr then took charge of a private school in Sonoma. A few years later he returned to San Francisco and, with his wife, established a seminary. In connection with this institution was the “Chapel of the Holy Innocents,” of which the doctor Was pastor. This building was located at the site of the Denman Grammar School. It was owned by the doctor and was destroyed by fire on the 10th day of October, 1860. For a year or so thereafter Dr. Ver Mehr was editor of the Pacific Churchman. He was one of the Vice-Presidents of the California Bible Society, organized in this city on October 30, 1849. His daughter is the wife of J. M. Seawell, the lawyer, and he leaves grown grandchildren. (Daily Alta California, Volume 40, Number 13095, January 20, 1886)

While the obituary highlights the physical changes Ver Mehr brought to the landscape of Northern California, it does not bring to life the many colorful experiences he had. In Checkered Life, readers are treated to an interesting account of a very full career.

 

The Occult World: Teachings of Occult Philosophy

by A. P. Sinnett

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Alfred Percy Sinnett (1840-1921), a journalist and Theosophist, wrote frequently to members of the Brotherhood of Adepts, an occult organization. The famous Mahatmas Koot Hoomi and Morya corresponded via mail with Sinnett, and Sinnett used parts of this correspondence to compose The Occult World. Together, along with others, they were building The Theosophical Society. Sinnett was friends with many of the leading theosophists and spent a productive time in India. The organization’s avowed object was at first the scientific investigation of psychic or so-called “spiritualistic” phenomena, after which its three chief objects were declared, namely (1) Brotherhood of man, without distinction of race, colour, religion, or social position; (2) the serious study of the ancient world-religions for purposes of comparison and the selection therefrom of universal ethics; (3) the study and development of the latent divine powers in man. The society has persisted through the decades and has branches or lodges scattered all over the world, some of which are in India, where its chief headquarters are established.

 

Black Rock: A Tale of the Selkirks

by Ralph Connor

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Originally published in 1898, Black Rock: A Tale of the Selkirks was written by Rev. Dr. Charles William Gordon, using the penname Ralph Connor. Gordon was a leader in the Presbyterian and then later on the United Church, so he wanted to protect his status and keep both roles separate. However, his religious and personal beliefs strongly motivated his writings. For example, Gordon was interested in church reform, and his writings on the matter of unifying churches eventually lead to the creation of the United Church of Canada in the 1920.

Gordon was born in Ontario, Canada in a community largely composed of Scottish immigrants. His father was a reverend, and as such, Gordon’s life became deeply infused with his religious teachings. Gordon went on to study theology at the University of Toronto and graduated in 1886. Gordon’s work sheds light on the callous way missionaries viewed the natural beauty of western Canada and the disregard they held for multiple Native tribes that inhabited those areas, their religious beliefs or way of life.

 

James Freeman Clarke: Autobiography, Diary and Correspondence

by Edward Everett Hale

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James Freeman Clarke was born on April 4, 1810 in New Hampshire. He was well educated, attending Harvard College, then Harvard Divinity School. He studied to be a minister in the Unitarian faith, taking the pulpit in Louisville, Kentucky. Seeing firsthand the horrors of slavery, he became
a vocal abolitionist. He wrote a great deal, crafting dozens of articles, over two-dozen books, and more than 100 pamphlets.

Clarke was interested in many things, to the enrichment of his congregations, including exploring eastern religions. He was also influenced by utopian writings and communities, and even went so far as to purchase the site of one, Brook Farm. He ended up giving the space to the US during the Civil War, where it was renamed Camp Andrew and used for training.

This new edition is dedicated to Rev. Dr. Robert M. Hardies, minister of All Souls Unitarian Church in Washington, and able leader of social causes.

 

The Occult Arts: An Examination of the Claims Made for the Existence of Supernormal Powers

by J. W. Frings

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J.W. Fring opens by noting he is skeptical of any claims of the supernatural. He defines supernatural broadly, and dedicates chapters to a variety of manifestations, including alchemy, telepathy, palmistry, and hypnotism. Fring chooses to highlight multiple versions of the supernatural, broadly defining, it, and then offers some points to challenge beliefs in these manifestations. Those who are intrigued about the continuing belief in things strange will find this work both useful and controversial.

 

The Huguenots in France: After the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes with Memoirs of Distinguished Huguenot Refugees, and A Visit to the Country of Voudois

by Samuel Smiles

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The Huguenots are French Protestants, a denomination that began during the early sixteenth century. Their place in French society oscillated between their being celebrated and defamed. On August 24, 1572, while marking Saint Bartholomew’s Day, thousands of Huguenots were massacred. After decades of fighting occurred, a guarantee of peace was issued, which largely remained in place until October 18, 1685 when Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes. Many Huguenots fled France to escape persecution, and settled in various places, such as the United States, England, Sweden, Denmark, and Switzerland.

Samuel Smiles (1812 – 1904), was a Scottish social reformer, parliamentarian, and prolific author. He promoted frugality and asserted that poverty was caused largely by irresponsible habits, which may help account for his admiration of the Huguenot culture of industry and entrepreneurship.

 

The Bahai Movement: A Series of Nineteen Papers

by Charles Mason Remey

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Charles Mason Remey (1874-1974) was the son of Admiral George Collier Remey and grew up in Washington DC, at 1527 New Hampshire Avenue NW, which is now the home of Westphalia Press and the Policy Studies Organization, and the American Political Science Association.. He drew detailed plans and did a survey of the house, which are deposited in the Library of Congress. He studied to be an architect at Cornell (1893-1896) and the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris (1896-1903), where he learned about the Baha’i faith, and quickly adopted it.

In 1903, Remey returned to Washington, DC, and wrote numerous works on Baha’i theology and practices. He spent much of his time traveling to teach and discuss the Baha’i faith, and at the same time developing architectural plans, with the occasional class taught at George Washington University. Remey wrote extensively, and his papers are held at the National Baha’i Archives, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, Princeton University, Yale University, and the Iowa Historical Society.

This new edition is dedicated to Professor Steven Smith, whose patient efforts to make historic 1527 New Hampshire safe for future generations deserve thanks and recognition.

 

 

A Series of Twelve Articles Introductory to the Study of the Baha’i Teachings

by Charles Mason Remey

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Charles Mason Remey (1874-1974) was the son of Admiral George Collier Remey and grew up in Washington DC, at 1527 New Hampshire Avenue NW, which is now the headquarters of Westphalia Press and the Policy Studies Organization. He drew plans and did a survey of the house, which are deposited in the Library of Congress. He studied to be an architect at Cornell (1893-1896) and the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris (1896-1903) where he learned about the Baha’i faith, and quickly adopted it.

In 1903, Remey returned to Washington, DC, and wrote numerous works on the Baha’i faith. He spent the majority of his time traveling to teach and discuss the Baha’i faith, and developing architectural plans, with the occasional class taught at George Washington University. Remey wrote extensively, and his papers are held at the National Baha’i Archives, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, Princeton University, Yale University, and the Iowa Historical Society.

 

The Great Indian Religions: Being a Popular Account of Brahmanism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Zoroastrianism

by G. T. Bettany

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G. T. (George Thomas) Bettany (1850-1891) was born and educated in England, attending Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge University, studying medicine and the natural sciences. He also attended London University in 1871, taking a degree in geology, and later receiving an MA six years later. He lectured on biology, and botany. Bettany wrote numerous works of history on various subjects, including A Biographical History of Guy’s Hospital (1892), Life of Charles Darwin (1887), and A Sketch of the History of Judaism and Christianity in the Light of Modern Research and Criticism (1892). He also was the English editor of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. He died of heart disease at the age of 41.

 

 

The Old Spanish Missions of California: A Historical and Descriptive Sketch

by Paul Elder

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There were twenty one Spanish missions in California, established between 1769 and 1833 by Catholic priests to spread Christianity. Paul Elder collected various snippets of California history and compiled it in this work with quotes from various primary sources and photographs of numerous missions across the state, which presents a romanticized view of their founding. This work only portrays a partial and sanitized tale of the Spanish missions in California and their impact. The missions relied on agriculture to fund themselves, and sought to convert and colonize the Native people and their land. Multiple rebellions against the missions occurred since the missionaries sought to destroy native culture, and in the process, they transmitted communicable diseases which killed thousands. Missions did not just exist in California, but also Texas, Arizona, New Mexico and Florida.

 

Story of the Huguenots: A Sixteenth Century Narrative Wherein the French, Spaniards and Indians Were the Actors

by F. A. Mann

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The Huguenots are French Protestants, a product of turmoil during the early sixteenth century. The Huguenot community oscillated between celebration and persecution in France. On August 24, 1572, while celebrating Saint Bartholomew’s Day, thousands of Huguenots were massacred. After decades of fighting occurred, an edict of peace was issued, which largely remained in place until October 18, 1685 when Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes. Many Huguenots fled France,  then, or before, to escape persecution. Some came to the United States, with the majority deciding to reside in Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and South Carolina. Others settled in England, Sweden, Denmark, and Switzerland. This work offers an interesting account of the Huguenots in Florida and their interactions with the local populace.

This edition is dedicated to Sam Hier, who knows about communities in strife.

 

 

A History of the Jews in England

by Albert M. Hyamson

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Albert M. Hyamson (1875-1954) was born in London. After attending Beaufort College, he started working for the post office in 1895. Once World War I broke out, Hyamson began writing a great deal in support of Zionism, much of it published by the British Palestine Committee and media outlets like the New Statesman. By 1917, Hyamson became the editor of The Zionist Review. Then Hyamson he became active in Department of Information’s Jewish Bureau, and among other things, wrote for The American Hebrew and American Jewish Chronicle, to drum up interest in Zionism. Hyamson began working for the Administration of Palestine and was in charge of immigration applications. However, since he refused to let anyone else assist with the work, he single-handedly created a backlog of nearly a year, until he was replaced. Hyamson moved into making policy and working with the tenuous position that Jews, Arabs and others in Palestine found themselves in. He helped created the Hyamson-Newcome proposal in 1937 which proposed a independent Palestinian state which gave full autonomy to all citizens, recognized Arab ownership of the area, and allowed for Jewish immigration to rise to 50% of the total population. This was rejected by some Zionist leaders, but Hymanson went on to write and advocate against political Zionism and was one of the seven founders of The Jewish Fellowship. He continued to seek out Jewish-Arab co-operation for a unified Palestine, but his efforts were continually rebuffed.

He wrote a great deal on other topics, including: A Dictionary of Artists and Art Terms (1906), The Humour of the Post Office (1909), Palestine Old and New (1928), and A Dictionary of International Affairs (1946).

This new edition is dedicated to the memory of Seymour Martin Lipset, great scholar and teacher.

 

 

My Ogowe: Being a Narrative of Daily Incidents During Sixteen Years in Equatorial West Africa

by Robert Hamill Nassau

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Robert Hamill Nassau (1835-1921) lived three lives as a busy doctor, colorful writer, and dedicated minister. He served several Presbyterian missions abroad, including present day Equatorial Guinea ogowealong the Ogowe River. In 1894, after France colonized Gabon and Ogowe, he spent his remaining years working in the German Kamerun (the region and its divided parts would later become reunified under the official name, The Republic of Cameroon) until 1906 when he retired and returned to the United States. My Ogowe offers a lens on the impact that colonization and missionary work had on the region and is a primary resource about the area.

This edition is dedicated to Larry Diamond, who among his many competencies has long been a shrewd observer of Africa.

 

A Century of Unitarianism in the National Capital, 1821-1921: The Shadow of Slavery

by Jennie W. Scudder

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Jennie Scudder’s work traces the sometimes controversial history of Unitarianism in the District of Columbia, centering on All Souls Unitarian Church. Scudder publshed the volume initially in 1909, but it wasn’t copyrighted until 1921, when the Church celebrated its hundredth birthday. The account includes the development of liberal religion not only in the District but in surrounding towns in northern Virginia centuryand Southern Maryland. There is a great amount of detail on the striking building on 16th Street in Washington, which echoes St. Martins in the Fields in London, the involvement of President Taft and other Washington Unitarians responsible in so small a way for the present look of the city, including luminaries such as Benjamin French and Ulysses Pierce, along with other important capital figures. Its use of original sources makes this a handy volume for anyone looking for more information on Unitarianism or the development of the East Coast.

This new edition is dedicated to Mark Ryan and Ginger Clarkson, good Unitarians, good friends.

 

Jewish Ceremonial Institutions and Customs

by William Rosenau PhD

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William Rosenau (1865-1943) was born in Wolstein, Germany, and then emigrated to the United States with his family when he was 11. Like his father, he went on to enter the rabbinate, studying at the University of Cincinnati and later the Hebrew Union College, a center for Reformed Judaism. He first served as a rabbi at Temple Israel in Omaha, but after three years, he moved to Baltimore to serve as a rabbi at Congregation Oheb Shalom, where he ministered for over fifty years with distinction. He was known for introducing English into the services, as well as being an ardent anti-Zionist. Rosenau was involved heavily in the development of social services in Maryland as well as in Reformed Judaism. He served on the Maryland Society for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis, the Baltimore School Board, Board of Prisoners Aid Association, Board of Jewish Education, and the Maryland Commission for the Higher Education of Negroes, among other organizations. He also founded the Jewish Welfare Board. He wrote a great deal as well. In addition to Jewish Ceremonial Institutions and Customs, he also produced Jewish Biblical Commentators (1904); Jewish Education (1912); Book of Consolation (1914); and The Rabbi in Action (1937). His papers are held at the American Jewish Archives in Cincinnati.

The History of the Jews: From 586 BCE to 1900 CE

by Gotthard Deutsch PhD

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Gotthard Deutsch was born in Austria as Eliezer Deutsch; Gotthard being a translation of his given first name into German. Deutsch studied at the Jewish Theological Seminary of Breslau as well as the University of Vienna, splitting his time between secular and Jewish institutions, eventually earning his PhD in 1881. For much of his life and career, Deutsch found himself balancing between religious and academic pursuits.

He was a prolific and highly respected author, writing in many languages, including German, Hebrew, and French. He was invited to become the chair of Jewish history and philosophy at Hebrew Union College, but nearly lost his position during World War I by openly arguing for a position of neutrality, which left him particularly ostracized. However, his excellent work and the support of other esteemed colleagues allowed him to remain on. He passed away in 1921 in Cincinnati. The History of the Jews is one of his later works and offers an intriguing narrative with special emphasis on the role of language.

This edition is dedicated to the memory of Seymour Martin Lipset, notable interpreter of society and identity, explorer of national exceptionalism and pluralism.

Secret Chambers and Hiding Places: The Historic, Romantic & Legendary Stories & Traditions About Hiding Holes, Secret Chambers, Etc.

by Allan Fea

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Allan Fea (1860-1956) went to Grove Hall School, Highgate, became a researcher in the India Office Library and then Private Secretary to Field Marshal Lord Strathnairn before a career in the Bank of England, 1880-1900. His history of hiding places features many illustrations. The work focuses on English history and bolt holes of Catholic priests during the mid to late 1500s, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. Her priority as ruler was establishing England as a Protestant country, which sent many Catholic clergy into hiding. Fea’s work discusses long and short term hiding places, tunnels and other associated architectural curiosities. Many of these were only uncovered centuries later during renovation. A few unfortunately held bodies. Allan Fea wrote several books on English history, including King Monmouth, Being a History of the Career of James Scott, The Protestant Duke, 1649-1685; James II and His Wives, Some Beauties of the Seventeenth Century and The Flight of the King. He was a gifted artist and photographer. This new edition is dedicated to John Belton, who is both an antiquarian and a scholar.

Boston Unitarianism 1820-1850: A Study of the Life and Work of Nathaniel Langdon Frothingham

by Octavius Brooks Frothingham

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A word of explanation seems to be necessary. Many years ago I proposed writing something in memory of Dr. Frothingham, but abandoned the project on account of the meagerness of the biographical material. Within the twelvemonth, a warm friend and admirer of his asked me to prepare a memoir. Then the matter was reviewed once moreBookCoverImage 2, and it occurred to me that some reminiscences of my father might be woven into a sketch of his time. This has been attempted, with what success others must judge. So much is certain, that if I did not undertake the task nobody else would. This will account for the mixture of denominational concerns with personal details. It is needless to say that the author writes as a historian, not as an advocate.”
-Octavius Brooks Frothingham

Observations of a Bahai Traveler

by Charles Mason Remey

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Observations of a Bahai Traveller

Charles Mason Remey (1874-1974) was the son of Admiral George Collier Remey and grew up in the house at 1527 New Hampshire Avenue, which is the headquarters of Westphalia Press and the Policy Studies Organization. He drew plans and did a study of the house, which is deposited in the Library of Congress. He studied to be an architect at Cornell (1893-1896) and the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris (1896-1903) where he learned about the Bahai movement.

Remey became president of the Bahai international council and when Shoghi Effendi, the supreme leader or Guardian of the faith died in 1957, Remey asserted that he was the new Guardian. Most did not accept this claim and his own followers subsequently split in different groups. Regardless of his later problems in asserting his supreme leadership, his books about his early travels and his architectural drawings and criticisms are outstanding.

Unitarian Bibliography: H. McLachlan’s The Unitarian College Library

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Three major collections of Unitarian and Nonconformist literature in Britain are at Luther King House in MancheUnitarian Bibliography COVER FRONT ONLYster, Harris Manchester College in Oxford University, and the Dr. Williams Library in London. This book gives important information about the Unitarian antecedents of the Luther King library, which is used by five colleges: Northern Baptist, Northern College (United Reformed and Congregational), Hartley Victoria College, (Methodist) Unitarian College Manchester, and Luther King House Open College. In turn, the library and Luther King House cooperate with the University of Manchester, a major holder of Nonconformist literature. Manchester thus is a center for scholarship related to various British denominations.

An Early Theosophical Controversy

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By C. Jinarajadasa

The An Early Theosophical Controversy COVER FRONT ONLYfamous theosophist leader H.P. Blavatsky (1831-1891) claimed to be in contact with the Adepts, the mysterious Tibetan prophets and seers whose teachings inspired the early Theosophical movement.  Whether they were real masters or inspired metaphors that Mme. Blavatsky created is a question that has never been satisfactorily settled, and these original papers are part of the continuing controversy.

James Martineau and Rebuilding Theology: J. Estlin Carpenter’s James Martineau, Theologian and Scholar

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James Martineau was for more than four decades a professor in what is now Oxford’s Harris Manchester College. His theology integrates the very personal in religious experience with the transcendent and seeks to infuse daily living with the sense of divinity. He retained a sense of awe which rationalism sometimes excludes, and in some ways anticipated Albert Schweitzer’s ideas of reverence for life. Notably, Schweitzer also had connections with Harris Manchester.