New Wars for Old: Being a Statement of Radical Pacifism in Terms of Force Versus Non-Resistance: with Special Reference to the Facts and Problems of the Great War

by John Haynes Holmes

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John Haynes Holmes was born on November 29, 1879 in Philadelphia, although he spent much of his youth in the Boston area. He grew up within the Unitarian church, and was extremely close to his grandfather, John Haynes. While he initially planned to enter business, as his grandfather did, he ended up graduating from Harvard Divinity School in 1904. He married the same time he graduated from school, and he and his wife, Madeleine Baker, relocated to Dorchester, Massachusetts, for Holmes to take up a position at a church. However he and Madeleine were deeply interested in hymns, and the connection helped Holmes find a new role at the Church of the Messiah in New York City. There Holmes combined his love of religion with a genuine desire to improve society. He delivered and published sermons such as “Christianity and Socialism”, where he found that Socialism was “the religion of Jesus, and of all the great prophets of God who have lived and died for men.”

Holmes went on to help found several powerful organizations seeking justice. In 1908, the Unitarian Fellowship for Social Justice was founded by Holmes and twenty other people. Holmes also helped found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the American branch of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and the War Resistance League.Although some people had rebuked Holmes during World War I when he preached pacifism, he was still very popular and drew people to wherever he preached. His goal was to create a uniquely multicultural and religiously diverse congregation, which he successfully did through The Community Church of New York. Holmes has had a profoundly positive impact, not just on the Unitarian Church, but the fabric of the United States.

 

 

 

 

British Burma and Its People: Being Sketches of Native Manners, Customs and Religion

by Capt. C.J.F.S. Forbes

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In 1879, Nature: The International Journal of Science, offered this review of this work:

“This book is offered as the result of thirteen years’ experience derived from close intercourse, both officially and privately, with the people of Burma during that period. Such works are frequently contributed by the pro-consuls of the British empire, and afford, apart from their scientific value, good material to judge of the men and methods of our colonial government…It is, however, seldom that we see combined with the administrative capacities of our governors and commissioners a thorough knowledge of the ethnology, biology, and physical characteristics of the regions over which they preside. When such a man appears, and further possesses the quality of observation, his work marks an epoch, and English rule receives a new significance. It is in no adverse spirit that we say thus early that Capt. Forbes’ work will not rank in this category, and we desire rather to commend it for what it does possess than to criticize it for the information which it does not supply.”

Captain Forbes, without the aid of any diagrams or other visual aids, spends a great deal of explaining economic systems, history, religion and other things he encounters in deep detail. While the work offers a lot of interesting insight on the region during the late 1800s, it is still flawed with some prejudices and misunderstandings that were commonly believed at the time.

 

 

 

 

War Scenes I Shall Never Forget

by Carita Spencer

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In this work, Carita Spencer offers some sketches of her experiences during World War I, along with photos, and even a menu. Spencer offered the work as an American going overseas to document the war, and to report her findings back to the United States. The scenes can be quite graphic, as war is.Spencer catalogued experiences predominantly by Belgian, French and English soldiers, nurses, doctors, Red Cross officials, and others. Unlike many war narratives, which focus solely on combat, Spencer’s narrative discusses the impact on the average citizen as well, noting how young girls were making lace to sell to benefit the soldier, the constant fear of “aero bombs”, and of a town where “nearly everyone…was ill with a touch of asphyxiating gas.” It is the hope of many of these shared recollections that the horrors of war be prevented. Spencer illustrates how deeply the pain, bloodshed and ruin permeate.

This new edition is dedicated to the faculty and students of the American Military University.

 

 

Geopolitics of Outer Space: Global Security and Development

by Ilayda Aydin

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Civilization in the twenty-first century is characterized by its technological capacity, which is substantially realized through space technologies. A desire for increased security and rapid development is driving nation-states to engage in an intensifying competition for speed and superiority to better utilize the unique assets of space. This competition, however, is rigorously challenged by the unforgiving physical properties of the space environment such as extreme temperatures and intense fluxes of radiation, as well as by an escalation in nuclear proliferation that could end all life known to human existence. Despite these challenges, humanity is taking eager steps into space—and is taking its various geopolitical rivalries and imperatives along.Does space development further or undermine global security? Can an obsession with security pose an ironically existential threat to humanity in this most fragile yet unforgiving environment it is stepping into? This book analyses the Chinese-American space discourse from the lenses of international relations theory, history and political psychology to explore these questions.

 

The Death Penalty in the Caribbean: Perspectives from the Police

Editor, Wendell C. Wallace PhD

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“The Death Penalty in the Caribbean is a novel, thought-provoking and timely contribution to the contentious debate of the Death Penalty in the Anglophone Caribbean. This book is directed at policy makers, law enforcement practitioners and scholars, and is a must read for students of criminology, international relations, political science and security studies for the light it sheds on this complex matter.”
—Dr. Suzette A. Haughton, senior lecturer of international relations and security studies, Department of Government, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus.

“The Death Penalty in the Caribbean is a clarion call to police leaders and police officers to share their views on the viability of the death penalty as a crime control mechanism for the Caribbean. The book presents cogent and reasoned discussions which are worthy of stimulating future discourse among policy makers, police leaders and academics and is very encouraging for the development of a Caribbean Jurisprudence.”
—Stephen Williams, Commissioner of Police, Trinidad and Tobago Police Service.

Many individuals have yearned to hear the voices of the often voiceless police leaders in the Caribbean. With this in mind, two controversial topics, policing and the death penalty, are skillfully interwoven into one book in order to respond to this lacuna in the region. The book carries you through a disparate range of emotions, thoughts, frustrations, successes and views as espoused by police leaders throughout the Caribbean. The book is a riveting read that will quench readers’ thirst for knowledge on the death penalty and policing as viewed through the lens of police practitioners. This book is a must read for students of criminology, law, police sciences as well as man on the street and is a great opportunity to listen to the voices of Caribbean police leaders as they bare it all for the readers. If you are interested in understanding the challenges faced by police officers, crime prevention and reduction strategies and the efficacy of the death penalty in the Caribbean, then this is a book for you.

Dr. Wendell C. Wallace is a Criminologist, Barrister and a Certified Mediator who also has over 15 years of progressive policing experience. These unique qualifications have placed him in a prime position to deliberate on the myriad of crime related issues such as the Death Penalty, obstacles to policing and crime prevention and reduction strategies that confront Caribbean countries and their police departments.

 

Reminiscences of the Santiago Campaign: The Spanish-American War of 1898

by John Bigelow Jr.

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The major land campaign of the Spanish-American War of 1898 was the American battle with Spain for the Cuban city of Santiago. Painfully aware of the mistakes made and lives needlessly lost, John Bigelow, Jr, who served as the Captain in the U.S. Calvary, wrote:

“The enlisting, organizing, drilling, and equipping of an army of over two hundred and fifty thousand men, the transportation of about twenty thousand of them to a theatre of war a thousand miles or more distant, and from a temperate to a tropical climate, on less than one month’s notice for preparation, involved endless confusion and an almost total disregard of the rules and precautions of scientific warfare. In this narration I have not sought to give undue prominence to, still less to disguise, any of the consequences of this want of preparation. On the contrary, if what I have to report can have any value, professionally or otherwise, and I hope it will be found to have some, it must consist mainly in the frank disclosure of everything that fell under my personal observation, the recurrence of which our Government in the future should strive to avoid.”

Military historians will find this an unusually candid account of a war that too often is described as an unmitigated success.

 

Goodwill and Its Treatment in Accounts: A Historical Look at Goodwill, Trade Marks & Trade Names

by Lawrence R. Dicksee and Frank Tillyard

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Lawrence R. Dicksee was deeply invested in all aspects of numbers when it came to business. He was head of a firm of accountants, Sellars, Dicksee and Co. He was also an esteemed scholar, working as an accounting professor at the University of Birmingham, while also serving as a Lecturer at the London School of Economics.

Dicksee began his practice as an accountant in 1886, and then began teaching later, in 1902. Even if students did not take a class with him, they likely encountered him, as he wrote numerous accounting textbooks, such as Advanced Accounting, Hotel Accounts, and Bookkeeping for Accountant Students, among numerous others. Dicksee had a deep impact on accountancy as it is taught, particularly in the United States. Goodwill and its Treatment in Accounts offers one such example.

This edition is dedicated to Rex Kallembach, CPA.