Garfield’s Words: Suggestive Passages from the Public and Private Writings of James Abram Garfield

by James Abram Garfield, Compiled by William Ralston Balch

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James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States. His term was cut short when he was assassinated in 1881, the same year he took office. Many biographies highlight the difficult circumstances Garfield overcame to become the President. He was born in Ohio on a farm and grew up helping his widowed mother. He worked many jobs to support his family, and was able to attend Williams College, graduating in 1856. He became a member of the Ohio State Senate, running as a Republican. During the Civil War he served as a major general. He then enjoyed a successful Congressional career in Washington. He rose through the ranks to become the Republican Presidential nominee during the 1880 presidential election. It was close, with Garfield beating his Democratic opponent, Winfield Scott Hancock, with a narrow margin. During his brief term, he worked to end corruption in the Post Office, and pushed civil service reform in many ways, namely the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, which eventually passed through by his successor, President Chester A. Arthur.

Westphalia Press occupies the historic mansion in Washington DC of Harry Garfield, the president’s son, longtime president of Williams, and is the repository of much Garfield memorabilia.

This is a reprint edition with minor text imperfections.

Herbert Hoover: A Reminiscent Biography

by Will Irwin

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Herbert C. Hoover (1874-1964) served one term as President of the United States, from 1929, until 1933. He met his wife, Lou Henry, who was the only female Geology major at Stanford University, while he attended there. The pair delayed marriage so Lou could finish her education, while Herbert could build his career abroad. He was a very successful mining engineer, and later became known for his humanitarian efforts during World War I, particularly for his aid to Belgium, while he led the U.S. Food Administration. Lou was a very successful scholar, learning Latin, Chinese and continuing her work in studying metallurgy, but it was slowed down by her raising of their two children, Herbert Charles Hoover and Allan Henry Hoover.

After his only eight months in office, the Great Depression occurred. Despite attempts to control it, including the Hoover Dam, and other large public infrastructure projects, and various attempts to push for higher wages, his efforts failed. He also supported Prohibition, which made him even less popular. He was overwhelmingly defeated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1932 election. Hoover remained near politics, as a vocal opponent of federal government growth. After World War Ii, he served in a few government roles, particularly those seeking to improve efficiency and foreign relations in Europe.

This new edition is dedicated to Richard Sousa, long an important part of the Hoover Institution

 

The Story of Garfield: Farm-Boy, Soldier, and President

by William G. Rutherford

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James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States. His term was cut short when he was assassinated in 1881, the same year he took office. Many biographies highlight the difficult circumstances Garfield overcame to become the President. He was born in Ohio on a farm and grew up helping his widowed mother. He worked many jobs to support his family, and was able to attend Williams College, graduating in 1856. He became a member of the Ohio State Senate, running as a Republican. During the Civil War he served as a major general. He then enjoyed a successful Congressional career in Washington. He rose through the ranks to become the Republican Presidential nominee during the 1880 presidential election. It was close, with Garfield beating his Democratic opponent, Winfield Scott Hancock, with a narrow margin. During his brief term, he worked to end corruption in the Post Office, and pushed civil service reform in many ways, namely the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, which eventually passed through by his successor, President Chester A. Arthur.

Westphalia Press occupies the mansion in Washington of Harry Garfield, longtime president of Williams, and repository of much Garfield memorabilia.

 

 

From the Farm to the Presidential Chair: The Life and Public Services of James A. Garfield

by James D. McCabe

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James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States. His term was cut short when he was assassinated in 1881, the same year he took office. Many biographies highlight the difficult circumstances Garfield overcame to become the President. He was born in Ohio on a farm and grew up helping his widowed mother. He worked many jobs to support his family, and was able to attend Williams College, graduating in 1856. He became a member of the Ohio State Senate, running as a Republican. During the Civil War he served as a major general. He then enjoyed a successful Congressional career in Washington. He rose through the ranks to become the Republican Presidential nominee during the 1880 presidential election. It was close, with Garfield beating his Democratic opponent, Winfield Scott Hancock, with a narrow margin. During his brief term, he worked to end corruption in the Post Office, and pushed civil service reform in many ways, namely the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, which eventually passed through by his successor, President Chester A. Arthur.

Westphalia Press occupies the mansion in Washington of Harry Garfield, longtime president of Williams, and repository of much Garfield memorabilia.

 

 

James A. Garfield: The Backwoods Boy Who Became President

by Frank Mundell

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James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States. His term was cut short when he was assassinated in 1881, the same year he took office. Many biographies highlight the difficult circbackwoodsumstances Garfield overcame to become the President. He was born in Ohio on a farm and grew up helping his widowed mother. He worked many jobs to support his family, and was able to attend Williams College, graduating in 1856. He became a member of the Ohio State Senate, running as a Republican. During the Civil War he served as a major general. He then enjoyed a successful Congressional career in Washington. He rose through the ranks to become the Republican Presidential nominee during the 1880 presidential election. It was close, with Garfield beating his Democratic opponent, Winfield Scott Hancock, with a narrow margin. During his brief term, he worked to end corruption in the Post Office, and pushed civil service reform in many ways, namely the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, which eventually passed through by his successor, President Chester A. Arthur. 


Westphalia Press occupies the mansion in Washington of Harry Garfield, longtime president of Williams, and repository of much Garfield memorabilia.

 

Discourse on the Life and Character of William Wirt

by John P. Kennedy

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Wirt made headlines most recently in 2005, but for an unfortunate reason. Someone had broken into the Wirt Tomb, located in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington DC, and his skull was taken and later found in a tin box with gold letters announcing that it was the skull of “Hon. Wm. Wirt.” According to reports, it was found as a part of a larger skull collection, anonymously sent to aBookCoverImage-5 city council member’s office, and then confirmed by the Smithsonian Institution forensics team that it was indeed the skull of Wirt. It was never determined who stole the skull, or why there was an unaccounted infant’s remains found in the disturbed family tomb.
Prior to his adventures in the afterlife, Wirt was best known for his eloquent and witty prosecution of Aaron Burr in his trial for treason, but he also argued many other major cases, including Gibbons v. Ogden, McCulloch v. Maryland and two cases involving Native American rights: Cherokee Nation v. Georgia and Worcester v. Georgia. He was the Attorney General from 1817-1929, serving under James Monroe and John Quincy Adams. After stepping down as Attorney General, Wirt went on to be a Presidential Candidate in the 1832 election, having been nominated by the Anti-Masonic Party, despite himself being a Freemason. He practiced law his whole life, and was known for giving lyceum lectures and writing on a whole variety of topics, including law, female education, French relations and past presidencies.

The Republican Manual: History, Priciples, Early Leaders, Achievements of the Republican Party

by E. V. Smalley

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Eugene Smalley was a great journalist and well-known enthusiast for the expansion of the Pacific Northwest and one-time private secretary to President James Garfield. He helped expose the Ku Klux Klan and was a frequent contributor to the Atlantic MonthlBookCoverImage-17y. His stalwart support of the Republican Party started with his youthful enlistment in the Civil War, and this book was intended as a helpmate in the Garfield presidential campaign of 1890.

Dr. Paul Rich is a life member of the American Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians, as well as of the Society for Civil War Historians and the American Studies Association.