Agent-Based Model Basics: A Guidebook & Checklist for Policy Researchers

by Dr. Liz Johnson

Purchase through Amazon  Purchase through CreateSpace

With ABM (agent-based model simulations, researchers can observe the dynamics of agents, the collectiveAgent-Based Model Basics: A Guidebook & Checklist for Policy Researchers, and the interrelating environment, in relation to policy. ABM simulations are well suited for capturing relationship connections and interaction processes from heterogeneous agents in operation during the policy process. ABMs allow for generating models and policy scenarios that can identify and show leverage points of policy drivers and policy regulators of what works and how it works in policy. Policy levers are not enacted in isolation. ABMs, if effectively applied, extend the limits of traditional input-output policy research providing insight into processes, mechanisms, and agent interactions in the mysterious policy black-box.

ABMs are built based on theories, assumptions, rules, algorithms, and data. Developing an ABM
starts with assumptions about agents, agent behavior, and the environment. Computer simulations then create scenarios with the capacity to reveal the dynamic consequences about the policy from the model’s assumptions. ABM is a methodology that can transcend traditional policy research, while capturing the dynamics of simple, complicated, complex and chaotic systems. This Guidebook provides an overview and a simple step-by-step “how to” use ABMs effectively in policy research.

Liz Johnson formerly worked as a news anchor, reporter, and PR specialist. She currently works with the Complex Systems Institute in Charlotte, NC. She has been conducting research and publishing on complex systems for over six years in the areas of policy, nanotechnology, human-centrism for species survival, education, sports, agent-based modeling, AI, hybrid engineering, qualitative research, and policy theory. She approaches research problems combining qualitative, quantitative, network science, and agent based modeling methodologies. In addition, she teaches critical thinking and courses on complexity internationally at conferences and academic institutions. Johnson co-founded the Journal on Policy and Complex Systems and serves as the Managing Editor. She holds masters in human development/ learning and ethics/applied philosophy, as well as a doctorate in educational policy and leadership..

The Sweden File: Memoir of an American Expatriate

by Bruce Stevens Proctor and Alan Robert Proctor

Purchase through Amazon  |  Purchase through CreateSpace

Bruce Proctor’s journey was a harrowing one – from top secrete Pentagon war-policy insider to American deserter. Interpreting reconnaissance photos taken over Southeast Asia d51aALyQ2WqLuring the Vietnam War, he concluded that the conflict was immoral, misguided and deceptive. He suddenly quit the Defense Intelligence Agency (which caused a furor) and joined the Air National Guard to avoid conscription. But his unit was activated, and within the year Bruce was AWOL in Sweden. This hybrid memoir is told in three narrative voices: letters from and to Bruce during 1968 – 1972, his reminiscences 40 years later and two years before his death, and his brother, Alan’s, reflections in 2014. Although he tried, Bruce never learned the language, necessary for a decent job. His letters and later recollections highlight the struggle: impoverishment; common laborer; counselor for disturbed children; taxi driver. He mastered yoga, yet was also mastered by drugs and alcohol. After four years of effort in a foreign culture, Bruce decided, “I must get out of here,” and immigrated to Canada. As the Poet Laureate of Missouri wrote, “It’s an account of…sustained heroism.” Compiled and edited with reflections by Alan Robert Proctor

 

California Chinese Chatter

by Albert Dressler

Purchase through Amazon  |  Purchase through CreateSpace

by Albert DresslerCalifornia Chinese Chatter contains telegrams sent in 1874 between Chinese citizens living in Downieville, California, and a court transcript of the murder trial of Ah Jake. It offers a unique view of the difficulties that Chinese immigrants had in the United SBookCoverImagetates, particularly in the midst of so much racism that eventually led to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. The California Gold Rush caused a spike in Chinese immigration, which was continued by the development of the first transcontinental railroad.

The California Gold Rush really was a bonanza. Between 1849 and 1855 the miners gathered more than $400 million dollars; once adjusted, it is a sum today reaching into the trillions. It was a social phenomenon marked by the carnivalesque. In his work Roughing It (1872) Mark Twain’s protagonist remarks as his brother heads West, “Pretty soon he would be hundreds and hundreds of miles away on the great plains and deserts, and among the mountains of the Far West, and would see buffaloes and Indians, and prairie dogs, an antelopes, and have all kinds of adventures, and may be get hanged or scalped, and have ever such a fine time, and write home and tell us all about it, and be a hero…And by and by he would become very rich, and return home by sea, and be able to talk as calmly about San Francisco and ocean, and ‘the isthmus’ as if it was nothing of any consequence to have seen those marvels face to face.”

Go they did to the Land of Golden Dreams, in the largest internal migration in American history, and the adventures and tragedies have created a large and memorable literature.

 

New Ideas for Online Learning: Keeping up with the Changes

Edited by Melissa Layne

Purchase through Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace  |  Open Access

BookCoverImage-4Can a growing number of students in distance education reach such levels that conventional education is permanently changed? Does online education reflect the current economic crisis? Are faculty becoming less and less conventional, while adjunct ranks swell still further? Is “education by Skype” potentially more effective than time honored lectures in a classroom? What is working in online education? How will online education influence primary and secondary instruction, and what is its future in developing countries? What are some of the most effective tools and technologies? And what are the challenges? These and other issues are explored as online learning tools and techniques advance.

Gold Days: California During the Eventful Days of ’49

by Owen Cochran Coy

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

The California Gold Rush really was a bonanza. Between 1849 and 1855 more than $400BookCoverImage-2 million dollars was gathered by the miners; once adjusted, it is a sum today reaching into the trillions. It was a social phenomenon marked by the carnivalesque. In Mark Twain’s Roughing It (1872), the protagonist remarks as his brother heads West, “Pretty soon he would be hundreds and hundreds of miles away on the great plains and deserts, and among the mountains of the Far West, and would see buffaloes and Indians, and prairie dogs, an antelopes, and have all kinds of adventures, and may be get hanged or scalped, and have ever such a fine time, and write home and tell us all about it, and be a hero…And by and by he would become very rich, and return home by sea, and be able to talk as calmly about San Francisco and ocean, and ‘the isthmus’ as if it was nothing of any consequence to have seen those marvels face to face.”

Go they did to the Land of Golden Dreams, in the largest internal migration in American history, and the adventures and tragedies have created a large and memorable literature.

Europe’s Welfare Policies: The Frayed Safety Net

European Policy Analysis, Vo. 1, No. 1: Europe’s Welfare Policies: The Frayed Safety Net

Edited by Klaus Schubert, Nils Bandelow, Peter Biegelbauer, and Fritz Sager

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace  |  Open Access

Contents:

Editorial Introduction to the First Issue of European Policy Analysis
Enhancing gender equity through evidence-based policymaking? Theorizing and tracing the use of systematic knowledge in family and tax policy reforms by Joachim Blatter, Clara Bombach, Roman Wiprächtiger

Special Issue on “The governance of welfare markets” Introduction to the special issue: The governance of welfare markets – trends and challenges by Tanja Klenk

Restructuring the Mixed Economy of Welfare: Three Modes of Privatization by Neil Gilbert BookCoverImage-3

The Privatization and Marketization of Pensions in Europe: A Double Transformation Facing the Crisis by Bernhard Ebbinghaus

Portability of Supplementary Pension Rights in Europe: A Lowest Common Denominator Solution by Igor Guardiancich

The Developing Trajectory of the Marketization of Public Employment Services in Denmark – A New Way Forward or the End of Marketization? by Karen N. Breidahl, Flemming Larsen

The governance of hospital markets – Comparing two Bismarckian countries by Tanja Klenk, Renate Reiter

Bending the Rules to Play the Game: Accountability, DRG and Waiting List Scandals in Norway and Germany by Simon Neby, Per Lægreid, Paola Mattei, Therese Feiler

Change agents and service providers? User organizations in the German healthcare system by Benjamin Ewert

Who is the Enemy?: The Revolution in Terrorism Affairs and the Ways to Understand It

by Alain Bauer

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

BookCoverImage-2Few people have the advantages that Alain Bauer possesses in providing an overview of the current world security crisis. He is the ultimate example of “been there, done that”. Welcome in the inner circles of a half dozen countries, his opinions are eagerly sought as the efforts to cope with terrorism at times seem like chasing an escalating train that is all too rapidly pulling away from the station. With a wry humor he has avoided the temptation to say that he told us so, considerably in advance of the current pandemonium. But he did tell us so, and this nuanced consideration of how the current and progressively worsening situation should be viewed at least gives us a start on rethinking the solutions.Those who know him also know that he is an ecumenical and tolerant thinker who balances the demands of protection with the tradition of civil rights. He is not an alarmist but a realist. This essay then provides a trusted overview of a dilemma, how to react to one of the most serious threats to Western democracy in living memory. The French experience has much we can appreciate. It’s examination could not come at a more needed time, and deserves the widest possible circulation and a permanent place is the literature of the unhappy challenges we now face.

Paul Rich
President, Policy Studies Organization

A Young Volunteer in Cuba: Or, Fighting for the Single Star

by Edward Stratemeyer, Illustrated by A. B. Shute

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

A Young Volunteer in Cuba is a work of historical fiction for young readers written by Edward Stratemeyer. This work, along with his Fighting in Cuban Waters, depicted the Spanish-AmeBookCoverImage-2rican War.

Stratemeyer used a variety of pseudonyms because he found that the titles sold better when thought to be written by several authors. A prolific writer, he collaborated in writing over 1,300 books that sold more than 500 million copies. They included incredibly popular juvenile fiction series such as The Bobsey Twins, The Hardy Boys, and Nancy Drew. To create so many titles, he developed the Stratemeyer Syndicate, a book-packaging technique utilizing several long-running series featuring the same characters in a formulaic structure. The Stratemeyer Syndicate was the first book packager to focus on children’s literature.

This new edition is dedicated to Judy Lauder.

The Symbolic Tradition of Freemasonry

Edited by Pierre Mollier

Purchase Print Version  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

This volume, full of significant work on Freemasonry and kindred subjects, is the result of a bold effort to make the best in articles about fraternalism appearing in tonguesother than English available to the English-speaking scholarly world. The productivity and sophistication of researchers in Europe has meant that important progress in the field has been neglected because of the language barrier. Bridging that gap, Pierre Mollier has brought to the editorship of the series his enormous knowledge as museum director, rare book librarian, and top archivist.
The ecumenical goal of the project is shared with the World Conference on Fraternalism, meeting in Paris every two years in cooperation with the Bibliotheque nationale de France and the Museum of Freemasonry.

Toward the Abyss: Israel and the Palestinians

by Dr. Alon Ben-Meir

Purchase on Amazon Purchase through CreateSpace

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict does not appear to be any closer to a resolution, even after decades of continuous struggle. Since the signing of the historic Oslo Accords, the divide between the two sides has devolved to its lowest point yet, which has made the opportunity for peace ever more elusive. The disregard of the psychological dimension BookCoverImageof the conflict, continuing occupation, rancorous public narratives, settlements enterprise, use of force, and failure of various peace negotiations over the past twenty years have glaringly demonstrated that the responsibility for the deadlock and the diminishing prospect of reaching a peace agreement any time soon falls squarely on both sides.

In this compelling series of essays, Dr. Alon Ben-Meir examines the various underlying issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and ultimately argues that the Israelis and Palestinians must take a hard, critical look at their current situation and decide what they want their future to be: a continuation of violent confrontations, or sustainable peace and security.

Dr. Alon Ben Meir is a professor and Senior Fellow at New York University’s Center for Global Affairs and at the World Policy Institute. Ben-Meir is an expert on Middle East politics and affairs, specializing in international negotiations and conflict resolution.

Ben-Meir hosts “Global Leaders: Conversations with Alon Ben-Meir” with top policy-makers from around the world, held at NYU. He writes a weekly article that appears in scores of newspapers, magazines and websites, and has been featured on networks such as ABC, Al Jazeera, Al Arabiya, al Hurra, CNN, and NBC. Ben-Meir has authored eight books and is currently working on a new book about the psychological dimension of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Dr. Ben-Meir holds a master’s degree in philosophy and a doctorate in international relations from Oxford University.

Harvard Episodes

by Charles Macomb Flandrau

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

When this book first appeared in 1897, the student newspaper the Harvard Crimson, was upset:

“With the exception of Haydock, all the characters are unmanly, snobbish, morbid or unhappy. That such characters exist in every college class is of course undeniable, but they are, after all, not typical of this University or, let us hope, of any other.

Harvard EpisodesIt is indeed admitted in the dedication that the book can lay no claim to being representative of Harvard, but this inconspicuous statement will be overlooked or soon forgotten by the average reader, and a distorted picture of life here will thus be circulated. If such a thing were possible, it would do no harm to confine the circulation of “Harvard Episodes” to Harvard undergraduates.

The book is, however, engrossing and exceedingly clever.
A distinct power of analysis and observation appears in every story, clear vision combining with fearless statement to produce conviction in the reader’s mind. We are indebted to the author for the best written book of fiction that has yet appeared on the subject of Harvard life, although narrow in its treatment.”

More than a century later, the characters may not seem unmanly, but the prose is still exceedingly clever.

Engineering America: The Rise of the American Professional Class, 1838-1920

by Edward Rhodes

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

In a single lifespan in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, America passed through an extraordinary economic and social transformation. Industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and westward expansion into the vast interior of the continent yielded the structural framework of the modern America we still recognize more than a century later. The roles played by financial capital, labor, and technology in this story have been widely examined. Less well understand, however, is the remaining puzzle: how did America generate the human capital necessary for this transformation? How did a largely agrarian nation with relatively weak and largely decentralized government institutions manage to produce the professional class – the doctors, lawyers, managers, and, most importantly, engineers – essential for the emergence of a modern, industrialized, yet still liberal and democratic America?

This study takes a micro approach to this question. It focuses on a single, unexceptional case, examining the process and experience through the eyes of a single participant. Born in rural New Jersey in the late 1830s, Daniel Harker Rhodes’s wanderings took him from a tinsmith apprenticeship in upstate New York to service in the Civil War, and then on to secondary education, college education, and eventually a career building railroads that opened up the agricultural potential of the Great Plains, the minerals of the Rockies, and the energy resources of Texas and Oklahoma. Rhodes’s detailed account highlights a number of intriguing factors: the availability of education and private capital to finance it, the absence of class barriers, social institutions and technology that permitted extraordinary geographic mobility, and perhaps most importantly the impact of deeply held Calvinist norms As with any case study, the insights that emerge are suggestive rather than definitive. In this case, however, the insights underscore the significance of an unusual combination of institutions in nineteenth century America and suggest intriguing reasons why America’s pattern of social and economic development followed its distinctive course.

Baghdad and Points East

by Robert J. Casey

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

Robert Casey belonged to the generation of foreign correspondents who outdid Hollywood in their adventures. Cited for bravery in World War I, he then spent twenty-seven years as a columnist for the Chicago Daily News. His search for stories took him to Indochina and Cuba, the Pitcairn Islands and London during the Blitz, the D-Day invasion, and the liberation of Paris. Widely admired for his prose style and facility for anecdote, he had a particular fondness for this volume. His papers are at the Newberry Library in Chicago, waiting for what could be an exciting biography.

 

Freemasonry in Inverness

by Alexander Ross

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

Alexander Ross (1834-1925) was educated at Inverness Royal Academy and became an architect like his father. He joined St. John’s Masonic Lodge in 1833 and eventually was its Master. Ross traveled throughout Scotland as public education expanded and was responsible for the plans of over 450 schools. An antiquarian and member of the Gaelic Society, he appeared in kilts “without the slightest excuse”. A striking portrait of him by George Reid hangs in the Inverness Town House. The building of Lodge Averon in the town of Alness was designed by him and is considered one of the outstanding Masonic edifices in Scotland.

On Foreign Service

by T. T. Jeans

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

This story is based on Experiences, of my own, in various parts of the world, and describes a Revolution in a South American Republic, and the part played by two armoured cruisers whilst protecting British interests. It describes life aboard a modern man-of-war, and attempts to show how the command of the sea exercises a controlling influence on the issue of land operations.

As the proof sheets have been read by several officers of the Royal Navy and Royal Marines, and many suggestions and corrections made, the naval portion of the story may be taken to give an accurate description of the incidents narrated.  -T.T. Jeans

Death Valley in ’49

by William Lewis Manly

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

The discovery of gold at Sutter’s Mills in California in 1848 caused thousands to give up their homes in Death Valley in '49 COVER FRONT ONLYthe eastern states and head West. To avoid the Sierra Mountains, which in winter could be deadly, a party led by William Lewis Manly (1820-1903) attempted to follow a trail that took them through Death Valley. Manly’s efforts to save the group are just part of his remarkable story, starting as a boy in New England and then Michigan and Wisconsin, having encounters with the Mormons, and being part of the expansion of America and the saga of California pioneer life with the demands of the mills and mines and the risks of illness and death.

Roads of Adventure

by Ralph D. Paine

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

Ralph Delahaye Paine (1871-1925) owed part of his swashbuckling success as a writer to connections Roads of Adventure COVER FRONT ONLYforged at Yale’s secret society Skull and Bones and to an early friendship with the publisher William Randolph Hearst, for whom he covered the Spanish American War as well as the Boxer Rebellion in China. His philosophy in this and his other books was, “If we wish to scale Mont Blanc, or visit a thieves kitchen in the East End, or go down in a diving dress or up in a balloon, we must be about it while we are still young…Youth is the time to go flashing from one end of the world to the other both in mind and body; to try the manners of different nations; to hear the chimes at midnight.”

The Story of the City Companies

by P.H. Ditchfield

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

As this volume shows, the guilds or livery companies of London started as medieval associations of The Story of the City Companies COVER FRONT ONLYtradesmen: haberdashers, skinners, goldsmiths, and ironmongers. They became charity foundations, trustees of schools and hospitals, custodians of art treasures and historic buildings, and the electorate for the leadership of the City of London. The guilds of the old occupations sometimes retain their ancient associations, but they also elect men and women of substance from many other callings, and there have been a number of new city companies serving air pilots, international bankers, and even tax advisers. London cannot be understood without understanding the origins of these unique societies.

Philippine Masonic Directory ~ 1918

by Chas. M. Colton

Purchase on Amazon Purchase on CreateSpace

Originally limited to the Spanish occupiers, Freemasonry attracted leaders of the Philippine Phillipine Directory COVER FRONT ONLYindependence movement and has played an important role in the history of the islands. The great leader Joseph Rizal was an active member, as were Marcelo H. Del Pilar, Graciano Lopez Jaena, Jose Alejandrino, brothers Juan and Antonio Luna, Ambrocio Flores, and Galicano Apacible. This scarce volume illustrates the extraordinary variety of lodges, including some with Scottish, French, American and Spanish roots, which were eventually to become the Grand Lodge of the Philippines.

Gems of Song for Eastern Star Chapters

compiled by Pitkin & Mathews

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

Although the Order of the Eastern Star at one time claimed ties to orders in the seventeenth and eighteenth century Swedish royal court, the consensus is that it was largely invented as a companion Gems of Song for Eastern Star Chapters COVER FRNO ONLYsecret society to Freemasonry in the nineteenth century. Both men who are Masons and women with a family connection to Masons are members, and chapters are found as far afield as Scotland and Australia. The temple in Washington D.C. on New Hampshire Avenue is particularly imposing. The ritual of the order provides opportunities for musical interludes, as do the public meetings, and over the years the Star has supported concerts and choirs.

Mexico: The Wonderland of the South

by W. E. Carson

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

William English Carson (1870-1940) was a controversial writer about social issues but when his book about Mexico first appeared in 1910, critics enthused:

“Mr. Carson knows Mexico thoroughly …It would be hard to discover anything worth seeing that he has not seen. He has wandered around the Mexican capital and other old cities; he had explored the gold and silver mines and visited some of the quaint health resorts; he had gone mountain climbing and tarpon fishing …compendious, concise and clear”.

Mexico COVER FRONT ONLYA century later Anthony Burton was less impressed: “Despite being an enthusiastic traveler, many of his views about Mexicans will strike modern readers as stereo-typical. For example, he dedicated an entire chapter to The Mexican Woman, which makes for fascinating reading despite many statements which read today as outrageous over-generalizations, such as “no foreigner, unless he be associated with diplomacy, is likely to have any chance of studying and judging the Mexican women”; “the Mexican girl has but two things in life to occupy her, love and religion”; “As a rule, the Mexican women are not beautiful”. !!! While readers may not agree with Carson’s views, the volume remains a classic depiction of Mexico in an era of turmoil.

Take a look at the book’s Original 1909 Cover.

A Trip to Palestine and Syria

by John P. Hackenbroch

Purchase on Amazon Purchase on CreateSpace

In 1913, the same year that this nuanced and colorful account of the Middle East was published, a group of Arab students living in Paris proposed an international meeting about Syria and Lebanon to A Trip to Palestine & Syria COVER FRONT ONLYdiscuss the decay of the Ottoman Empire, the part the European powers were playing in the region, Zionist settlements in Palestine, and the signs of growing crisis in the region. The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs agreed to be the sponsor. The congress was held June 18-23 and there were delegates representing all the major faiths, as well as a spectrum of political positions, and a hopeful discussion that looked to the future. Of course World War I began in July 1914 and the Arab Congress of 1913 was not replicable. Nor of course were the travels of John Hackenbroch in this volume. A hundred years have passed and the problems remain.

Star Gleams: A Collection of Songs, Odes, and Ceremonials

by Carrie B. Jennings

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

Although sometimes claiming seventeenth and eighteenth cenStar Gleams COVER FRONT ONLYtury Scandinavian origins and found in Scotland and Canada and Australia, the Eastern Star is really an American secret society closely tied to Freemasonry. Women largely lead it, although some male Masons serve as officers. This collection, made by Carrie Jennings, illustrates how patriotism and fraternalism often combined in the nineteenth and twentieth century United States, producing hybrid rituals of community.

View the book’s Original 1919 Cover.

Old Time Schools and School Books

by Clifton Johnson

Purchase on Amazon Purchase on CreateSpace

Primers and other early American schoolbooks were often lost due to years of use, neglect and Old Time Schools COVER FRONT ONLYeventually becoming outdated. Thankfully, Clifton Johnson, in Old Time Schools and School-Books, is able to draw from his vast collection of school books in order to offer readers a taste of the insides of these books, from the printed content to graffiti scribbled in the margins. Additionally, Johnson presents lively scenes of how schoolhouses operated in order to present a larger picture of the development of education, particularly as it unfolded in Massachusetts. Although nearly a century old, the book offers a thoughtful and engaging look at the early roots of education in the United States.

Take a look at the book’s Original Cover.

Manual of Knights Templar

by Edward J. Newman

Purchase on Amazon Purchase on CreateSpace

Manual of the Knights Templar COVER CONCEPTPartly because of novelists and Hollywood, the Masonic Knights Templar have enjoyed an enormous amount of recent attention, and are the subject of extravagant claims about their antiquity. The truth is that the present Templars, while admittedly going back many years, owe much to the eighteenth century, and not to the Middle Ages. They certainly are a highly ritualistic and very curious organization, as this volume of their secrets illustrates.

History of the Knights of Pythias

History of the Knights of Pythias COVER CONCEPT FRONT ONLY

by Jos. D. Weeks

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

Although a secret society, the Pythians sought to aid reconciliation after the Civil War and gave rise to other movements, including the Dramatic Order Knights of Khorassan, Princes of Syracuse, Knights of Omar, and Order of Calanthe. Membership is less than it once was, but lodges exist in more than twenty states and Canada.

Lyrics & Love Songs

by Albert Pike, with a new introduction by Paul Rich

Purchase on Amazon 

Albert Pike was a Harvard dropout, Confederate general, lawyer for Native American causes, celebrated Masonic leader, and lifelong writer of poems. Erudite in many languages and expert on folklore and mythology, his work “Morals and Dogma” continues to be a major text in the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry. Despite his insistence that he was not the author, the much-reprinted poem “The Old Canoe” continues to be attributed to him and figures in this volume of his verses.

 

Spies I Knew

by Marthe McKenna

Purchase on Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

Born in Flanders, Marthe Cnockaert McKenna (1892-1986) was recruited in 1915, during World War I, to an Anglo-Belgian espionage ring. Her cover was as a nurse, and the Germans awarded her the Iron Cross for her hospital work. After a period as a double agent she was apprehended by them and sentenced to death. The sentence was not carried out and she was released from prison at the Armistice in 1918.

Spies I Knew COVER FRONT ONLYCited for heroism by Winston Churchill, she received the French and Belgian Legions of Honour. The star Madeline Carroll portrayed her in Victor Saville’s 1933 thriller, I Was A Spy. She became a British subject and during World War II the Nazis included her in The Black Book of leaders to be arrested when they invaded England.

This book appeared in 1934 and was perhaps her most forthright and psychologically interesting work, showing signs of the influence and collaboration of “Jock” McKenna, the British Army officer she had married.

Take a look at the original dust jacket back-flap.

The Boy Chums Cruising in Florida Waters

Boy Chums COVER FRONT ONLY

by Wilmer M. Ely

with a new preface by Robert Rich Jr.

Wilmer M. Ely introduced whole generations of American youth to the adventures of the Chums and produced this classic story of Florida in the days of rum runners.

The young heroes have their boat stolen from them, and without any money they sign on with a commercial fisherman to pursue catch along the coast of Florida. Not everyone they meet is a sportsman, to put it mildly, and they confront some pretty rough criminals who are out to make as much trouble as possible. The boys acquire staunch allies in honest fisherman who help them beat back the crooks, but not without close calls and high adventure.

This new edition is introduced by Robert Rich Jr., a well-known authority on Florida fishing and its long history.

Take a look at the Original Cover.

Purchase through Amazon

John Rowe

John Rowe COVER FRONT ONLYby John C. Phillips

with a new preface by Robert E, Rich Jr.

John Rowe’s observations on fishing near Boston in the eighteenth century appeared in a rare limited edition of only 150 copies more than eighty years ago. Besides his Boston area fishing, Rowe went on excursions to the Monument River, which is now the Cape Cod Canal. He appears in American history briefly as an owner one of the ships involved in the Boston Tea Party, but his notes on angling before the Revolution are perhaps a more enduring claim to fame.

 Purchase through Amazon

Crime 3.0: The Rise of Global Crime in the XXIst Century

Crime 3.0 COVER FRONT ONLY

by Alain Bauer

with a forward by Paul Rich

Alain Bauer argues that we need, with considerable immediacy, to press the formal study of crime in the academy, and that more resources need to be channeled towards that purpose. The approach in universities, if they do deign to study the subject, is often relegated to adjuncts and regarded by the more established departments with disdain. Given the prejudices of conventional scholars towards the subject, it is no wonder that the response to crime has been inept, and grows increasingly inadequate, considering the highly adaptive nature of crime and its implications in a globalized world in the XXIst Century.

Alain Bauer is Professor of Criminology at the French National Conservatory for Arts and Crafts (Paris), and Senior Research Fellow at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice (New York) and the University of Law and Political Science of China (Beijing).

Purchase through Amazon

 

Revolutionary Civility

Revolutionary Civility COVER FRONT ONLY

by George Washington

There was a time when how to use finger bowls and napkin rings was part of education. In dispensing with archaic manners, we seem to have also dispensed with the common sense sensitivity that among other advantages made possible political discourse without viciousness. Decorum has been jettisoned, often with the excuse that the times are different. The end result has been stress instead of kindness, the evaporation of care and consideration, and gross inefficiency in solving problems rather than any alleged streamlined savings. The quality of our political life has deteriorated and the upshot has been a stalemate in dealing with contemporary social problems. The Westphalia Press Civility Series offers classic texts about behavior, which if taken to heart might have practical consequences.

Purchase through Amazon

Expansive Civility

Expansive Civility COVER FRONT ONLYby Lord Philip Dormer Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield

There was a time when how to use finger bowls and napkin rings was part of education. In dispensing with archaic manners, we seem to have also dispensed with the common sense sensitivity that among other advantages made possible political discourse without viciousness. Decorum has been jettisoned, often with the excuse that the times are different. The end result has been stress instead of kindness, the evaporation of care and consideration, and gross inefficiency in solving problems rather than any alleged streamlined savings. The quality of our political life has deteriorated and the upshot has been a stalemate in dealing with contemporary social problems. The Westphalia Press Civility Series offers classic texts about behavior, which if taken to heart might have practical consequences.

Purchase through Amazon 

Manifest Civility

Manifest Civility COVER FRONT ONLY

Manifest Civility: The Young Man’s Own Book

There was a time when how to use finger bowls and napkin rings was part of education. In dispensing with archaic manners, we seem to have also dispensed with the common sense sensitivity that among other advantages made possible political discourse without viciousness. Decorum has been jettisoned, often with the excuse that the times are different. The end result has been stress instead of kindness, the evaporation of care and consideration, and gross inefficiency in solving problems rather than any alleged streamlined savings. The quality of our political life has deteriorated and the upshot has been a stalemate in dealing with contemporary social problems. The Westphalia Press Civility Series offers classic texts about behavior, which if taken to heart might have practical consequences.

Purchase through Amazon

Industrial Civility

Industrial Civility COVER FRONT ONLY

by Alex M. Gow

There was a time when how to use finger bowls and napkin rings was part of education. In dispensing with archaic manners, we seem to have also dispensed with the common sense sensitivity that among other advantages made possible political discourse without viciousness. Decorum has been jettisoned, often with the excuse that the times are different. The end result has been stress instead of kindness, the evaporation of care and consideration, and gross inefficiency in solving problems rather than any alleged streamlined savings. The quality of our political life has deteriorated and the upshot has been a stalemate in dealing with contemporary social problems. The Westphalia Press Civility Series offers classic texts about behavior, which if taken to heart might have practical consequences.

Purchase through Amazon

Progressive Civility

Progressive Civility COVER FRONT ONLY

by Henry J. Wehman

There was a time when how to use finger bowls and napkin rings was part of education. In dispensing with archaic manners, we seem to have also dispensed with the common sense sensitivity that among other advantages made possible political discourse without viciousness. Decorum has been jettisoned, often with the excuse that the times are different. The end result has been stress instead of kindness, the evaporation of care and consideration, and gross inefficiency in solving problems rather than any alleged streamlined savings. The quality of our political life has deteriorated and the upshot has been a stalemate in dealing with contemporary social problems. The Westphalia Press Civility Series offers classic texts about behavior, which if taken to heart might have practical consequences.

Purchase through Amazon

Civility and the Great War

Civility and the Great War COVER FRONT ONLYby Walter Lippman

There was a time when how to use finger bowls and napkin rings was part of education. In dispensing with archaic manners, we seem to have also dispensed with the common sense sensitivity that among other advantages made possible political discourse without viciousness. Decorum has been jettisoned, often with the excuse that the times are different. The end result has been stress instead of kindness, the evaporation of care and consideration, and gross inefficiency in solving problems rather than any alleged streamlined savings. The quality of our political life has deteriorated and the upshot has been a stalemate in dealing with contemporary social problems. The Westphalia Press Civility Series offers classic texts about behavior, which if taken to heart might have practical consequences.

Purchase through Amazon

The Autobiography of Theophilus Waldemeier

Autobiography of Theophilus Waldeimer COVER FRONT ONLY

by Theophilus Waldemeier

Theophilus Waldmeier (1832-1915) was a Swiss Quaker who first attracted international attention when he was imprisoned by King Theodore of Ethiopia and rescued by British forces at the battle of Magdala in 1859. He went to Beirut and founded the Brumana School, his lasting achievement, and which became one of the most famous schools in the Middle East. Brumana has provided the education of presidents, prime ministers, and royal princes. It is still a Quaker school, a center for Quaker activity in the region, and welcoming students of all manner of backgrounds. He also helped establish the Lebanon Hospital for Mental and Nervous Disorders, the major psychiatric training facility in the Middle East for many years but which closed in 1982 in consequence of the Lebanese civil wars.

Purchase through Amazon

Misunderstood Children

Purchase through Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

by Elizabeth Harrison

Elizabeth Harrison (1849-1927) founded the National Louis University in Chicago, originally meeting in the Art Institute. She was a friend of Maria Montessori, with whom she spent time in Rome in 1912-13, Misubderstood Children cover FRONT ONLYand of Jane Addams, the Nobel Peace Prize winner and social reformer, and a co-founder of the National Parent Teachers Association (the PTA). National Louis University maintains an extensive archive of her books and papers.

A voluminous writer, she considered her books to be an essential way of reaching the public with her message of the importance of early childhood education. She was immensely energetic and had lively intellectual interests that ranged from cartoons, the philosophy of 
Schiller, the Star island poet Cecilia Thaxter, to Raphael and Shakespeare. She believed that children had a great deal to teach adults and this volume is perhaps the clearest affirmation of that philosophy.

Maxims of James Abram Garfield

Purchase through Amazon  |  Purchase through CreateSpace

by James A. Garfield

James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States. He was a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1863 to 1881.

He is the only president to have been an ordained clergyman and was president of Hiram College in Maxims of James Abram Garfield COVER FRONT ONLYOhio, and a general in the Civil War. Widely read, he had a propensity for apt pithy observations on life. His presidency lasted only 200 days as he was shot by a disgruntled office seeker on July 2, 1881 and died some weeks later.

One of his sons, Harry Garfield, was the longest serving president of Williams College and a close friend of Woodrow Wilson. Harry maintained a home in Washington at 1527 New Hampshire Avenue, which is now the headquarters of Westphalia Press and the Policy Studies Organization.

France & New England-Volume 3

Purchase through Amazon  Purchase through CreateSpace

by Allan Forbes & Paul Cadman

 This is the third volume of a series published during the 1920s that was prompted by the 100th anniversary of the visit of the Marquis de Lafayette to America at the end of his life to farewell the country he had helped establish, and his presence at the dedication of the Bunker Hill monument.  Long out of print, the set has been difficult to acquire.

 More than two million Americans speak French as a first language, and more than eleven million Americans are of French descent.  In Maine (which at one time was a part of Massachusetts) there is a French-American Day when the legislature conducts business in French, says the Pledge of Allegiance in French, and sings the Star Spangled Banner in French. Prejudice has been replaced by appreciation and reacquisition classes conducted in public libraries to help French Americans recover their laFrance and New England 3 COVER copy copynguage.

 One challenge is that New England French is different from modern Parisian French. It would be readily understood by Louis XIV, and Yvon Labbé, director of the Franco-American Center at the University of Maine illustrates this: “French-Americans may say “chassis” instead of “fenêtre” for window, “char” instead of “voiture” for car… many French-Americans pronounced “moi” as Molière did: “moé.” A saying illustrates French-Americans’ inferiority complex about their language: “On est né pour être petit pain; on ne peut pas s’attendre à la boulangerie” (“We are born to be little breads; we cannot expect the bakery”).

 This trilogy on the links between France and America that Westphalia has now published should help in some small way to fill a gap in knowledge about an important part of American history, and of the advantages of having such sturdy foundations for the continuing friendship between the two countries. The nearness of Quebec and the Maritimes to New England should guarantee that the French connection will remain significant. It has been the quietest of histories for too long.

Eight Decades in Syria

Purchase through Amazon  |  Purchase through CreateSpace

by A.J. McFarland

The Reformed Presbyterian Church is a very small denomination of about six thousand members that at one time had a presence in the Middle East. This scarce record of its activities amongst the Arabs was compiled by Andrew James McFarland, 1869-1952, a missionary clergyman who spent most of his life in Syria despite all the upheavals in the region. In fact, during World War I when the Ottoman Empire was at war with the Allies and most non-Muslims fled, Eight Decades in Syria COVER FRONT ONLYReverend McFarland remained in Mersine, billeting a German officer and helping treat wounded Turkish soldiers.

 Those interested in Syrian history will find the list of clergy valuable as their papers can be located in archives such as those at two of the sect’s institutions, Geneva College and its theological seminary, for insights about the Syrian situation in their time. Of course the 1919 peace settlement meant the dismemberment of the Ottoman territories and the French suzerancy over present day Syria, but the missions stayed on for many years.

 Eventually the churches and schools that McFarland established disappeared, but the diaries, correspondence, and reports of nearly a century of Reformed Presbyterian activity are an underused and important resource. This is one of a number of scarce Middle East titles that Westphalia has published to promote interest in neglected archives.

View the book’s Original Cover.

Meeting Minutes of Naval Lodge No. 4 F.A.A.M. 1813

Purchase through Amazon Purchase through CreateSpace

Edited and Introduced by Isaiah Akin

This book contains the Meeting minutes of Naval Lodge No. 4 F.A.A.M. of Washington DC from 1813, along with articles about the people mentioned and the Washington Navy Yard where many of them worked, and gives insight into Freemasonry in early America.

In the book, you will find images of the original minutes from 1813, and on the opposite page, you will find a transcription of those minutes to make reading a bit easier. In addition, notnaval-meetings-book-cover-1813 copyes and articles of historical interest have been added.

Strictly speaking, minutes are a record of what happened at a particular meeting. They list who attended, what motions were made, what votes taken, and so on. At first glance, they can be very dry, very mundane. Although written 200 years ago with quill pens and by candlelight, they closely resemble minutes taken at meetings today.

But it is that similarity that makes them so important. These minutes help ensure a sense of continuity. They help preserve a shared Masonic history and culture.

These minutes help us realize that when George Washington became a Mason in 1752, he went through a ceremony very similar to what we went through to become Masons. They remind us that the symbols we use, and the values we cherish, are very similar to those embraced by Elias Ashmole when he became a Freemason in 1646.

These minutes are a symbol that just as Freemasonry has existed for hundreds of years, so it will continue for hundreds more.

Ivanhoe Masonic Quartettes

Purchase through Amazon  |  Purchase on CreateSpace

Selected and arranged by Thomas C. Pollack

with a new preface by Sion M. Honea

The numerous initiatory degrees which are staged by Masonic organizations are generally plays in which the candidate is a principal actor. Music has been a part of these dramas for at least the last two hundred years, and some Masonic temples are equipped with notabIvanhoe Masonic Quartettes COVER FRONT ONLYle pipe organs and have stages with elaborate backdrops which can be used to add color to the events. Famous composers such as Sibelius and Mozart have written pieces specifically for the rituals.
However, less spectacular Masonic events also call for music. Frequently the conferring of degrees will be followed by a meal, or festive board, where appropriate entertainment is in order. And there is a ritualistic event known as a table lodge, when toasts with special glasses are given to a peculiar cadence and there is occasionally a quartet.
This ready market for a whole variety of solos, marches, choruses, and timely thematic interludes has included quartets such as are in the Ivanhoe collection. The lodge honored by the name, Ivanhoe No.610 on the rolls of the Grand Lodge of New York, was in its heyday in the 1860s when the scores were brought together. It is representative of a very large genre of nineteenth century pieces for Masonic gatherings.
Sir Walter Scott, the Scottish author and a Freemason, was partly responsible for the popularity of Ivanhoe as a name for Masonic lodges, commandaries, and buildings. His novel, published in 1820, is set in the year 1194, and its hero helps restore Richard to the throne of England after many adventures. Sometimes viewed as the book that helped begin the fondness for modern historical fiction, it certainly inspired the Masons to name their organizations in honor of the medieval hero … and in this case, their assemblages of sheet music.

Take a look at the book’s Original Cover.

France & New England Volume 2

France and New England 2 COVER FRONT ONLY

by Allan Forbes & Paul Cadman

The French may have lost their war for America in the eighteenth century but they have never disappeared from New England. About five percent of the population of Maine speak French, with another three percent speaking it in New Hampshire and two and a half percent in Vermont. In fact, in some towns the majority use French as a first language: for example, sixty-give percent in Berlin, New Hampshire, and eighty-four percent in Madawaska, Maine.

French spoken in New England over the centuries is a dialect related to Canadian French, but the culture is distinctive and concern over its existence was one reason for the documentary film Réveil This cinema study by Ben Levine examines the persecution of French Americans by the Ku Klux Klan, and the struggles to preserve a proud heritage in a monoculture America, and should be seen along with reading the books in this trilogy.

One asset in that long struggle has been the American respect for the memory of the Marquis de Lafayette. His friendship with Washington and his exploits in the American Revolution are a permanent foundation for Franco-American ties. After his service in the American Revolution, Lafayette fell on hard days as the French Revolution involved him trying to prevent excesses and for his pains he was imprisoned for five years.  Bonaparte obtained his freedom and he served until his death in the French Chamber of Deputies.

As Lafayette neared the end of a notable life, in 1824, President James Monroe invited him to be the guest of the American nation in a gesture of thanks for his role in American independence. He accepted and visited New England in 1824, including New Haven and Providence, as well as Lexington, Concord, Salem, Marblehead, and Newburyport. In late August that year he was received in Boston with enormous excitement.  He then toured all existing twenty-four states. On returning to Boston in June 1825 towards the end of his American travels, he laid the cornerstone of the Bunker Hill Monument on June 17. After a final dinner with President John Quincy Adams in Washington, he sailed for to France on September 7. He died in 1834 and is buried in Paris under soil from the Bunker Hill battlefield.

The series of which this title is part is a reminder of the friendship between the two countries that he so embodied, commemorated as well by the American Friends of Lafayette, the Massachusetts Lafayette Society, the Society for French Historical Studies, and the French Heritage Society. It is very much a living tradition.

Purchase through Amazon

Dr. John Bull

Dr. John Bull COVER FRONT ONLY

by Leigh Henry, with a new introduction by Matthew Brewer

Dr. John Bull is a fascinating look at the life and times of one of the most influential English composers in musical history. Leigh Henry vividly realizes both the events that shaped John Bull as well as the world he inhabited. Through a richly detailed account of John Bull’s England, Henry portrays a man in the midst of a sea change in both music and everyday life.

Purchase through Amazon

The Amenities of Book Collecting

The Amenities of Book Collecting COVER FRONT ONLYby A. Edward Newton

with a new introduction by Katherine Mead-Brewer

The Amenities of Book Collecting is a unique compilation of literary history, autobiography, travel writing, and, of course, the history of book collecting. Through these essays and reflections, Newton presents his own travels, collecting goals and expeditions, relationships, and interests as an introduction, for the layman and budding collector alike, to the surprisingly wide world and art of serious book collecting.

Purchase through Amazon

France & New England Volume 1

France and New England 1 COVER FRONT ONLYby Allan Forbes & Paul Cadman

The State Street Bank, which published this book as part of a series of three about France and New England to mark the 100th anniversary of the visit of the Marquis de Lafayette to Boston, was given a charter in 1792 by none other than John Hancock, in his role as governor of Massachusetts. Its original name was the Union Bank.

Eventually Union Bank merged with the State Street Trust Company, which had been established in 1891. In time the name was shortened to the State Street Corporation, which today is custodian for over six trillion dollars in assets. But it retains a clipper ship as its logo, and is still headquartered in Boston.

Connections with the founding of the United States made the bank very conscious of its history, and it not only supported scholarly publications but actively collected prints, maps, hanging lanterns, even harpoons – becoming a historical museum about old Massachusetts.

For many years, the prime mover in the bank’s vigorous collecting was Allan Forbes, a scion of the celebrated Brahmin family of Forbes. Graduating from Harvard, he went to work for State Street in 1899 and became president in 1911, then chairman of the board until his death in 1955.

He was eclectic in his antiquarian interests and even produced a highly useful study of clipper ships on sailing cards. If one asks why the head of a large financial concern would take time for such esoteria, perhaps it suffices to say he was a real Bostonian and a quote from Fortune Magazine in 1933 is apt: “The more or less romantic individuals who delight to discover in any community its sources of real power would find this whole Boston hierarchy – social, financial, and political – very little to their taste. At the top, but in another dimension altogether, are the Bostonians. Time cannot wither nor custom scale their infinite variety of sound investments. Social power is theirs. Civilization is theirs.” Three volumes about France and New England are thus easily understood.

Purchase through Amazon

Dante and His Time

Dante and His Time COVER FRONT ONLY

by Karl Federn

In Dan Brown’s book, Professor Langdon tells his Harvard class that “Dante’s Inferno is a landscape so rich in symbolism and iconography that I often dedicate an entire semester course to it.” While taking Dr. Langdon’s course on Dante is impossible, there is no better guide to the references in Brown’s novel than Karl Federn, the great Dante scholar.

Purchase through Amazon

President John Quincy Adams’ Quarrel with the Freemasons

John Quincy Adams's Quarrel with the Freemasons COVER copy copy

Edited and Introduced by Guillermo De Los Reyes

Such was the revulsion in the United States over the purported murder of William Morgan, an upstate New Yorker who in 1826 disappeared after threatening to expose Masonic secrets, that political groups campaigned to drive Masons out of office and close down their lodges. President John Quincy Adams devoted considerable energy to the controversy, as this remarkable set of letters shows. He not only scorned Freemasonry but opposed college secret societies as well, and his feelings about secrecy continue to be of interest as in a new era we face Wikileaks and other challenges to covert activities.

Purchase through Amazon