The Indiana Supreme Court, With Some Account of the Courts Preceding It: An Historical Sketch

by Timothy Edward Howard

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Timothy Edward Howard was born on January 27, 1837 in Northfield, Michigan. He went on to attend Notre Dame, but he put his undergraduate degree on hold to serve in the Civil War for the Union. After only a month in service, he was terribly wounded at the Battle of Shiloh. He recovered, and was able to finish his studies. He became a professor of many subjects, but then went on to become the state senator of Indiana from 1886-1892. Afterwards, he served as the chief justice on the Supreme Court of Indiana, stepping down from his second term as the senator. He maintained his love of history, serving as the president of the Northern Indiana Historical Society. He wrote a great deal on several topics, including US history, law, and poetry as well. He passed away on July 9, 1916 in South Bend, Indiana.

This new edition is dedicated to Christopher L. Hodapp, able writer and historian, always conscious of the specialness of Indiana and its past.

 

 

 

The Death Penalty in the Caribbean: Perspectives from the Police

Editor, Wendell C. Wallace PhD

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“The Death Penalty in the Caribbean is a novel, thought-provoking and timely contribution to the contentious debate of the Death Penalty in the Anglophone Caribbean. This book is directed at policy makers, law enforcement practitioners and scholars, and is a must read for students of criminology, international relations, political science and security studies for the light it sheds on this complex matter.”
—Dr. Suzette A. Haughton, senior lecturer of international relations and security studies, Department of Government, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus.

“The Death Penalty in the Caribbean is a clarion call to police leaders and police officers to share their views on the viability of the death penalty as a crime control mechanism for the Caribbean. The book presents cogent and reasoned discussions which are worthy of stimulating future discourse among policy makers, police leaders and academics and is very encouraging for the development of a Caribbean Jurisprudence.”
—Stephen Williams, Commissioner of Police, Trinidad and Tobago Police Service.

Many individuals have yearned to hear the voices of the often voiceless police leaders in the Caribbean. With this in mind, two controversial topics, policing and the death penalty, are skillfully interwoven into one book in order to respond to this lacuna in the region. The book carries you through a disparate range of emotions, thoughts, frustrations, successes and views as espoused by police leaders throughout the Caribbean. The book is a riveting read that will quench readers’ thirst for knowledge on the death penalty and policing as viewed through the lens of police practitioners. This book is a must read for students of criminology, law, police sciences as well as man on the street and is a great opportunity to listen to the voices of Caribbean police leaders as they bare it all for the readers. If you are interested in understanding the challenges faced by police officers, crime prevention and reduction strategies and the efficacy of the death penalty in the Caribbean, then this is a book for you.

Dr. Wendell C. Wallace is a Criminologist, Barrister and a Certified Mediator who also has over 15 years of progressive policing experience. These unique qualifications have placed him in a prime position to deliberate on the myriad of crime related issues such as the Death Penalty, obstacles to policing and crime prevention and reduction strategies that confront Caribbean countries and their police departments.

 

Issues in Maritime Cyber Security

Editors: Dr. Joe DiRenzo III, Dr. Nicole K. Drumhiller, Dr. Fred S. Roberts


The world relies on maritime commerce to move exceptionally large portions of goods, services, and people. Collectively this effort comprises the Maritime Transportation System or MTS. A major component of this daunting multifaceted enterprise are cyber networks, and the infrastructure they control. From the complex programs managing the loading and unloading of containers to waiting trucks, to the global navigation systems onboard vessels, to the hydraulic valves designed to protect spills into waterways that are located and controlled by cyber systems within chemical, water/wastewater, or petroleum plants, the MTS is becoming increasingly automated.

The impact of the cyber element on the international MTS is significant. Yet, with the clear advantages this brings, come vulnerabilities, and challenges. Researchers have demonstrated that it is possible to remotely take control of a vessel by spoofing its GPS. The news has reported attacks that shut down a floating oil rig by tilting it. The electronic positioning software systems on ships are vulnerable to attacks that could modify les and charts, causing potential for serious damage. The complexity of the problem of making our MTS safe from cyber attack is daunting and the need for all stakeholders in both government (at all levels) and private industry to be involved in cyber security is more significant than ever as the use of the MTS continues to grow.

While there is literature about the maritime transportation system, and about cyber security, to date there is very little literature on this converging area. This pioneering book is beneficial to a variety of audiences, as a text book in courses looking at risk analysis, national security, cyber threats, or

maritime policy; as a source of research problems ranging from the technical area to policy; and for practitioners in government and the private sector interested in a clear explanation of the array of cyber risks and potential cyber-defense issues impacting the maritime community.

About the Editors: Dr. Joe DiRenzo III is a retired Coast Guard Officer. Dr. Nicole K. Drumhiller is the Program Director of Intelligence Studies at American Military University. Dr. Fred S. Roberts is Director of the Department of Homeland Security University Center of Excellence CCICADA, based at Rutgers University.


Release date: July 2017

International or Local Ownership?: Security Sector Development in Post-Independent Kosovo

by Dr. Florian Qehaja

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International or Local Ownership? contributes to the debate on the concept of local ownership in post-conflict settings, and discussions on international relations, peacebuilding, security and development studies. It utilizes extensive data collection, including public opinion surveys conducted throughout the country, in order to introduce the concept of local ownership from a policy level towards academia. Empirical data on the relationship between international community and locals in the process of design, management and control of the security sector in the post-independent Kosovo represents one of the most intriguing examples of extensive international community involvement in a state-building project.

Qehaja explains why an excessive role from the international community, which offers no clear exit strategy, has led to the rejection of externally driven policies by local constituencies, finding no applicability in the context of Kosovo. It also shows how international involvement has led to a detachment of security policy from local reality, causing fragmentation and limited sustainability.

Florian Qehaja is currently the Director of Kosovar Centre for Security Studies (KCSS), one of the most prominent think tanks in the Western Balkans. He has over twelve years of experience in cooperating with leading international governmental and non-governmental organisations in Kosovo and the Western Balkans. Mr. Qehaja is author of several scientific and policy publications in the security field, and the recipient of prestigious Fulbright and OSI/Chevening scholarships.

 

 

Criminology Confronts Cultural Change

Edited by Alain Bauer

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Is using the humanities and social sciences (psychology, sociology, law, etc.) to understand the crime, the criminal, the victim, criminality, and society’s reaction to crime a science? A crime is the unique combination of a perpetrator, a victim, and a set of circumstances. Its individual and quantitative analysis requires scientific methods and specific intellectual and technical abilities. 


Emile Durkheim emphasizes that “[…] A number of acts can be observed, all with the external characteristic that once accomplished, they provoke this particular reaction from society known as punishment. We make of them a group sui generis, on which we impose a common rubric. We call any punished act a crime and make crime thus defined the focus of a dedicated science: criminology.”

About the editor:
Alain Bauer is Professor, Chair of Criminology, National Conservatory of Arts and Crafts, Paris, Senior Fellow at the Terrorist Center of John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York (USA), Senior Fellow at the Law and Political Science University of China in Beijing (PRC), President of the National Private Security Control Council (CNAPS) (since 2012), President of the Strategic Research High Council to the President of France (since 2009), sometime Vice President of the Sorbonne University, Consultant for the New York Police Department (USA), the Los Angeles Sheriff Department (USA), the Sûreté du Québec (Canada), Colonel of the Air Force (Reserve), Republic of France.

His books include Violences et insécurité urbaines (PUF 1998, 12ème éd. 2010), L’Amérique, la
violence, le crime (PUF 2000, 2ème éd. 2001), La guerre ne fait que commencer (Jean-Claude Lattès
2002, Folio Gallimard 2003), Les polices en France (PUF 2001, 3ème éd. 2010), Le crime aux États-
Unis (PUF 2003), Les polices aux États-Unis (PUF 2003), Dico Rebelle (Michalon 2004), Imaginer la sécurité globale (La pensée et les homes, Bruxelles 2004), État d’urgence (Robert Laffont 2004), L’énigme Al Qaida (Jean Claude Lattès 2005), Géographie criminelle de la France (Odile Jabob 2006, Histoire criminelle de la France).

New Crimes and New Solutions: International Journal of Criminology

New Crimes and New Solutions: International Journal of Criminology

Edited by Alain Bauer

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Coming to Kindle soon!

Is using the humanities and social sciences (psychology, sociology,law, etc.) to understand the crime, the criminal, the victim, criminality, and society’s reaction to crime ascience? A crime is the unique combination of a perpetrator, a victim, and a set of circumstances. Its individual and quantitative analysis requires scientific methods and specific intellectual and technical abilities.

Emile Durkheim emphasizes that “[…] A number of acts can be observed, all with the external characteristic that once accomplished, they provoke this particular reaction from society known as punishment. We make of them a group sui generis, on which we impose a common rubric. We call any punished act a crime and make crime thus defined the focus of a dedicated science: criminology.”