Lectures on Sculpture: On the Death of Thomas Banks, Antonio Conova, and John Flaxman

by John Flaxman R.A., Contributions by Sir Richard Westmacott R.A.

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John Flaxman (1755-1826) was an extraordinarily popular British sculptor, illustrator, and teacher. He earned his start by creating funerary monuments. Despite moving on to creating different sculpture forms and art in different media, he was still influenced by his early form of bas-reliefs and incorporated it into other projects. Having married an intelligent, hard working wife, Anne Denman, the pair enjoyed a lot of success and support of one another. Together they enjoyed many years in Rome, with Flaxman illustrating and sculpting a great deal. after nearly eight years, they returned to England, where Flaxman was made an Associate of the Royal Academy, where he exhibited for a few years before he was made a full Academician, where he went on to teach.

Flaxman remains an extremely influential figure. University College London has much of Flaxman’s work in terms of writings, drawings, and plasters and the famed Flaxman Gallery. Sadly, some of it was damaged during air raids of World War II.

 

In the Great God’s Hair: Translated from the Original Manuscript

by F. W. Bain

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F.W. Bain translated this work from the original Sanskrit, and offered this as an introduction, “The name of the little Indian gable, here presented to the lover of curiosities in an English dress, is ambiguous. We may translate it indifferently, either: The New Moon in the hair of the God of Gods, or else, She That Reduces the Pride of Gods, Demons, and all the Rest of Creation, that is the Goddess of Beauty and Fortune. To those unfamiliar with the peculiar genius of the Sanskrit language, it might seem singular, that two such different ideas should be expressible by the one and the same word. but it is just in this power of dexterous ambiguity that the beauty of that language lies.”

Francis William Bain was born on April 29, 1863 and lived until March 3, 1940. He enjoyed a wide variety of pursuits in his life, ranging from being an amateur footballer to serving as a professor of history in British India. Yet he considered himself primarily a writer, specializing in fantasy, which he claimed to have translated from Sanskrit. However, these works were not directly taken from Hindu manuscripts, but were rather a mixture of Orientalism and Bain’s interest in fantasy. Although it was revealed that Bain was lying about the origins of such works as In the Great God’s Hair, his readership was unaffected. However, it is important for readers of to know that the views that this work imparts on marriage, love, and religion, are largely those of Bain’s and not a true reflection of Hinduism.

 

Dave Darrin and the German Submarines

by H. Irving Hancock

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Harrie Irving Hancock was born on January 16, 1868 in Massachusetts, passing away on March 12, 1922. Although he was a chemist, he is recognized more for his writing. He was a journalist for several years, working for the Boston Globe, and served as a war correspondent during the Spanish-American War. He specialized in juvenile writing, although he also wrote a bit about sports, and even a series of books about physical fitness. Typically, his stories featured adventures with male hero figures, sometimes set in the past, or often in military combat. He typically wrote under his name, though occasionally used a pseudonym. He is credited with writing dozens of books, along with numerous articles for newspapers and magazines.

Hancock was enamored with Japanese fighting styles, such as Jiu-Jitsu, and not only wrote about it, he practiced the sport. Unfortunately, he was also guilty of using racial stereotypes in his works, particularly against Germans and Chinese characters, as the subtitle of his work illustrates.

 

The Quintessence Of Nietzsche

by J. M. Kennedy

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Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) has had a profound impact on our way of life. Among other things, he was a philosopher, a poet, and a scholar. Unfortunately, he suffered from poor health, which caused him to resign from his position as the Chair of Classical Philology, which he held at the age of 24. At 44, he was so ill that his mother, and then his sister had to care for him until his death at the page of 55. Nietzsche wrote on numerous subjects, but is commonly associated with nihilism, critiques of Christian morality, and his strong opposition to anti-Semitism and nationalism. There was a brief time when his sister reworked his manuscripts to favor Nazi ideology, but the correct manuscripts were uncovered. Many scholars have written about Nietzsche.

J. M. Kennedy was the pen name for John McFarland, who wrote extensively on Nietzsche. He also wrote on education, philology and war.

This new edition is dedicated to Daniel Gutierrez Sandoval and Emma Norman, who have had different views of Nietzsche.

Please note that this is a reprint of the original version, and has a few small blemishes.

 

The White Morning: A Novel of the Power of the German Woman in Wartime

by Gertrude Atherton

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Born on October 30, 1857, in San Francisco, Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton was fortunate enough to be raised by her grandfather after her parents divorced when she was two. Her grandfather was Stephen Franklin, a relative of Benjamin Franklin, was deeply committed to her education. After completing school, she ended up eloping with her mother’s suitor, George H. B. Atherton, and moved to live with him and his family in Fair Oaks, California. Life was difficult, because of the constricting role of womanhood, Atherton found herself in. Sadly, her husband and son died as a result of two different tragedies.

Left alone to care for their daughter, Muriel, Atherton turned to writing. She quickly gained notoriety after her first book, The Randolphs of Redwood: A Romance was published. Her family was very disappointed because of the nature of the publication, so she traveled to New York and Paris, where her writing began to be embraced. She wrote under psuedonyms, including male ones such as Frank Lin, especially early in her career. She was an extraordinarily prolific writer, writing dozens of books in addition to writing for newspapers and magazines, along with plays and films. She was a feminist, and in this work, The White Morning, Atherton imagines the world as led by women.

 

Dublin Castle and the Irish People

by R. Barry O’Brien

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Richard Barry O’Brien ware born in Kilrush, in the mid-west region of Ireland, in 1847. He was passionate about Ireland, particularly its history and politics, although his first love was always of writing, which he preferred even when offered the opportunity to get into politics. O’Brien studied law at Catholic University in Dublin. He was called to the Irish bar in 1874, and to the English bar in 1875.

O’Brien wrote voluminously, including such works as The Irish Land Question and English Public Opinion (1879), Thomas Drummond: life and letters (1899), and Irish Memories (1918). Not surprisingly, O’Brien began and served as the president of the Irish Literary Society of London. He passed away in 1918.

 

The Great Transformation: Scottish Freemasonry 1725-1810

by Dr. Mark C. Wallace

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Modern Freemasonry emerged in Britain after 1700 as a prominent fixture in both British communal and social life. It combined earlier stonemason customs and methods of organization with the popular passion for clubs and societies. Some mocked Masonic lodges and their rituals, but they were an accepted feature on the social scene, given that they avoided political and religious discussion and swore loyalty to the existing regime. The French Revolution, however, caused a severe backlash against the masons in Britain and Europe. Despite its commitment to the establishment, Freemasonry came under suspicion. By the 1790s, lodges were viewed as convenient vehicles for radical groups to pursue covert revolutionary activities. As a result, legislation was passed which attempted to regulate these societies and eradicate any traces of secrecy. This book examines the structure, nature, and characteristics of Scottish Freemasonry in its wider British and European contexts between the years 1725 and 1810. The Enlightenment effectively crafted the modern mason and propelled Freemasonry into a new era marked by growing membership and the creation of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, with the institution becoming part of the contemporary fashion for associated activity.

Dr. Mark C. Wallace is an Associate Professor of History at Lyon College. He teaches British and Scottish history, including British Imperialism, British cultural, social, and intellectual history from the fifteenth century to the present, and the Scottish Enlightenment. A former Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, he has written extensively on Scottish Freemasonry and eighteenth-century Scottish clubs and societies.