Melodies for the Craft, or Songs for Freemasons Suitable for Every Occasion

by R. Fellow

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. One subject getting renewed attention is Freemasonry. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

This edition of Ernst’s classic collection is dedicated to the brothers of St. John’s Lodge in Boston, oldest Masonic lodge in the Western Hemisphere.

 

History of Freemasonry in England from 1567 to 1813

by Leon Hyneman

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

A Place in the Lodge: Dr. Rob Morris, Freemasonry and the Order of the Eastern Star

by Nancy Stearns Theiss PhD

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UPDATED EDITION

Ridiculed as “petticoat masonry,” critics of the Order of the Eastern Star did not deter Rob Morris’ goal to establish a Masonic organization that included women as members. As Rob Morris (1818-1888) came “into the light,” he donned his Masonic apron and carried the ideals of Freemasonry through a despairing time of American history. His voluminous writing on Freemasonry and his ability to pen poems that celebrated occasions or honored the deceased earned him the title of Poet Laureate of Freemasonry in the 19th Century. An obscure figure in American history, Morris changed the world of Freemasonry making it one of the largest fraternal organizations in the world today. This book is a revised edition in the celebration of Rob Morris’ 200th year birthday, born July 31, 1818. It is based on a collection of family letters about Rob Morris’ journey in the world of Freemasonry that took him across the continents. In this revised edition, there are more letters, details about his literary contributions and images.

 

The Great Transformation: Scottish Freemasonry 1725-1810

by Dr. Mark C. Wallace

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Modern Freemasonry emerged in Britain after 1700 as a prominent fixture in both British communal and social life. It combined earlier stonemason customs and methods of organization with the popular passion for clubs and societies. Some mocked Masonic lodges and their rituals, but they were an accepted feature on the social scene, given that they avoided political and religious discussion and swore loyalty to the existing regime. The French Revolution, however, caused a severe backlash against the masons in Britain and Europe. Despite its commitment to the establishment, Freemasonry came under suspicion. By the 1790s, lodges were viewed as convenient vehicles for radical groups to pursue covert revolutionary activities. As a result, legislation was passed which attempted to regulate these societies and eradicate any traces of secrecy. This book examines the structure, nature, and characteristics of Scottish Freemasonry in its wider British and European contexts between the years 1725 and 1810. The Enlightenment effectively crafted the modern mason and propelled Freemasonry into a new era marked by growing membership and the creation of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, with the institution becoming part of the contemporary fashion for associated activity.

Dr. Mark C. Wallace is an Associate Professor of History at Lyon College. He teaches British and Scottish history, including British Imperialism, British cultural, social, and intellectual history from the fifteenth century to the present, and the Scottish Enlightenment. A former Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, he has written extensively on Scottish Freemasonry and eighteenth-century Scottish clubs and societies.

 

The 33 Principles Every Mason Should Live By: The True Meaning of Being a Mason

by C. Fred Kleinknecht Jr.

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In 1947 Fred took a job at the House of the Temple, literally learning the Scottish Rite from the ground floor to eventually becoming Grand Commander. He was Grand Commander from October 23, 1985 to October 7, 2003. Fred wanted the organization to be “first class” in all of its endeavors. He would often say “because Freemasonry lives not just for today, but for generations to come, we must be first class in whatever we do.”
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Fred rebuilt the Rite’s endowment infrastructure and helped generate forty-seven state and local Scottish Rite Foundations. Internationally Fred restored a regular Scottish Rite presence in Portugal, and established new Supreme Councils in Togo and the Ivory Coast. He reestablished the Scottish Rite in Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Russia, Slovenia, and Romania.
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Fred was a true people person making lasting friendships wherever he went and helping others along the way. Fred had a paperweight on his desk with his favorite quote:<br>
“You can accomplish much, if you don’t care who gets the credit.”
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These 33 principles are what all Freemasons should live by, they are the true meaning of Freemasonry. This book will not only benefit the Freemason but everyone can profit. I pass this along to you as a record of the Kleinknecht legacy of leadership. Also included is an appendix containing powerful messages published in the New Age / Scottish Rite Journal written by Grand Commander Kleinknecht, 33°.

 

Ritual Order of the Rainbow for Girls

by W. Mark Sexson

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. It deals with an order for girls and young women that has become worldwide.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable. Included are titles about youth movements such as Rainbow, DeMolay, and Job’s Daughters.

 

The History of the Order of the Eastern Star Among Colored People

by Mrs. S. Joe Brown

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

This volume sheds light on African-American masonic organizations. Here, Mrs. S. Joe Brown writes of the history of the Order of the Eastern Star, highlighting its developments across the United States, including Indiana, Georgia, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Minnesota, South Carolina, New York, Texas, Alabama and Washington, DC.