Storia del Grande Oriente d’Italia (Italian Edition)

by Emanuela Locci

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Questo volume è la traduzione italiana di un libro precedente nato con l’intento di colmare una lacuna bibliografica, infatti, fino alla sua pubblicazione non era presente nella letteratura massonica un libro che trattasse in maniera organica la storia della massoneria in Italia, scritto in inglese. Questo volume si proponeva di eliminare questa mancanza e di far conoscere a una parte del mondo, quella che si rifà alla lingua anglosassone, la storia della più importante delle Obbedienze che operano in Italia: il Grande Oriente d’Italia.

Il libro nasce dall’unione delle competenze di giovani ricercatori italiani che si occupano di massoneria e si sono incontrati in occasione del primo seminario promosso dal Centro Ricerche Storiche sulla Libera Muratoria che si è tenuto a Torino nel 2017 e che hanno deciso di mettere il loro sapere e la loro professionalità al servizio della storia e di questo libro.

 

Worlds of Print: The Moral Imagination of an Informed Citizenry, 1734 to 1839

by John Slifko

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Plato, Aristotle, Baron Montesquieu, and Jean Jacques Rousseau argued that you could never have a democracy bigger than the geographic size, intimate oral habits, and embodied rituals of face-to-face communication, and walking distance of a Greek city-state, French town, or small Swiss city. However, in the years surrounding the 1776 American War of Independence and accelerating into the 1800s in the American northeast and mid-Atlantic, there was a significant cultural transformation in the transition from oral/aural cultures to an increasingly literate citizenry. A consequence of this transition was an expanded geographical range of democratic engagement. In this book, John Slifko argues that freemasonry was representative and played an important role in this transformation and helped articulate the moral imagination of an informed democratic citizenry via fast emerging worlds of print.

A metamorphosis occurred through worlds of print anchored at home in the routine lives of local community and transmission in space across networks of place. Communication and political participation were enhanced in early America through a growing range of print vehicles such as pamphlets, newspapers, declarations and books of all types concerned with ancient and modern learning. The formation of local civic associations and reading libraries further contributed to this growth of available print documents. This work examines the vital roles that freemasons played in this print transformation.

About the Author:

John Slifko (1950-2018) was an expert in the fields of Freemasonry and Esotericism. He dedicated much of his scholarly and charitable work to studying democratic civil societies.

In 2015, John was awarded the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Geography from University of California, Los Angeles. He completed a joint Bachelor’s degree in Urban Planning and Geography in 1987 from San Francisco State and a Master’s degree in 1989 from University of California, Los Angeles in Urban Planning. John worked as a Planning Deputy for the Los Angeles City Council and as a Legislative Aide Field Representative for the United States Congress.

He was a founding member and served on the Board of Advisors at the Hannah Mather Crocker Society, Notre Dame University. He was also a Founder and co-Director of the Roosevelt Center for the Study of Civil Society and Freemasonry and Project AWE, which is dedicated to exploring connections between Western esotericism and the arts.

John was described by Zhenya Gershman, an Artist and Art Historian, as someone who “had a thirst for knowledge and a striving for improvement of life conditions for others that continues to be contagious. The concept of ‘Moral Imagination’ represented to John a combination of the reverie for artistic creativity with simultaneous responsibility for the world”.

 

Masonry and Protestantism

by Susanna Hopkins Mason

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.John J. Lanier was a self-described, Masonic Lecturer, and author of numerous books on Masonic culture, including The Master Mason, Masonry and Citizenship, and Washington, the Great American Mason.

 

Annals of the Hobby Club of New York City, 1912-1920

by New York Hobby Club

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In 1908, the Hobby Club was established as a gentlemen’s club. Planned to be a space for people to showcase their special interests, the “object of the Club shall be to encourage the collection of literary, artistic and scientific works; to aid in the development of literary, artistic and scientific matters; to promote social and literary intercourse among its members, and the discussion and consideration of various literary and economic subjects.”

Only a maximum of fifty men were allowed to be members, and in order to gain admission to the club, one had to prove they had an interesting, well defined hobby. Members gathered around extravagant dinners while each regaled one another with collections, tales and other displays of their findings.

This work offers some insight on the club, especially membership, topics of talks, and details on the dinners they shared.

 

 

 

Proceedings of the General Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star at its Fourth Stated Meeting, August 17-23, 1883

by General Grand Chapter

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

Although the Order of the Eastern Star at one time claimed ties to orders in the seventeenth and eighteenth century Swedish royal court, the consensus is that it was largely created as a companion secret society to Freemasonry in thenineteenth century. Both men who are Masons and women with a family connection to Masons are members, and chapters are found as far afield as Scotland and Australia.

 

 

 

 

An Address Delivered Before the Members of the Anti-Masonic State Convention: Assembled at Augusta, Maine, July 4, 1832

by Moses Thacher

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Moses Thacher was born on November 14, 795 in Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was frustrated with the growing number of people involved with Freemasonry in his religious community. He felt the oats one swore as part of Masonic ritual were incompatible with religious doctrine. It became a serious issue for Thacher, so much so that he felt it destroyed the character of his Christian church. He was not alone, as numerous other people left their church to join one that prohibited Freemasonry. He penned a few anti-Masonic tracts, including, “Masonic oaths neither morally nor legally binding” and “Reasons assigned by the Church in North Wrentham for withdrawing from their masonic brethren and others and being formed into a distinct and seperate church.” On July 21, 1878, at the age of 82, Thacher passed away in Cambridge, Henry County, Illinois.

 

 

 

History of Saint John’s Lodge of Boston

by Saint John’s Lodge Freemasons

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Saint John’s is the oldest lodge in the United States and its social history when fully written will be a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. Fraternal organizations like Saint John’s have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by inattention form scholars and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects.As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable. This volume about a famous lodge with a grand history is a case in point.

 

 

 

History of the Grand Orient of Italy

Emanuela Locci, Editor

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The initiative to write this volume comes from the need to fill a bibliographic gap: no book in Masonic literature upon the history of Italian Freemasonry has been edited in English up to now. Thus, it aims to cover this lack and to enter those scholars referring to the English idiom into the history of the most eminent Obedience acting in Italy: the Grand Orient of Italy. The book consists of eight studies, written by young researchers devoted to this topic, and covers a span from the Eighteenth Century to the end of the WWII, tracing through an orderly temporal plot the story, the events and pursuits related to the Grand Orient of Italy.

 

 

 

Ritual for Local Camps: Royal Neighbors of America, Auxiliary of the Modern Woodman of America

by Royal Neighbors of America

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The early members of the Society were ahead of their time. In addition to providing life insurance for women, they stood firmly behind the women’s suffrage movement. Royal Neighbors was also one of the first fraternal societies to insure children and recognize mortality studies establishing the fact that women live longer than men, and to reflect that difference in life insurance premiums.Royal Neighbors of America was founded in 1888, when Marie Kirkland got a group of eight wives of Modern Woodmen of America members to meet in Council Bluffs, IA. Within a year, they became a fully fledged organization with ritualistic practice and an articles of incorporation, as the non-profit organization wanted to better the world. They also wanted to benefit from insurance laws, so they incorporated in Peoria, IL in 1895, forming as a beneficiary society under the lodge system. They are developed as a non-profit, mutual aid organization that provides insurance. The organization was active in the women’s suffrage movement, and has assisted with providing aid to those in need during numerous natural disasters since the 1906 San Francisco, as a part of their ideology of providing aid to neighborhoods in need.

 

History of the Fraternal Order of Eagles

by J. Fanning O’Reilly

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The Fraternal Order of Eagles is an international fraternal organization that was founded on February 6, 1898 in Seattle, Washington by a group of six theater owners. It was initially composed of those who worked within the performing arts. The first meetings were typically social gatherings held on theater stages. As the organization grew, they began to seek out positive changes to make in society. They are considered to be the driving force behind Social Security and Mother’s Day. Members also began to create a unique identity, such calling their lodges “aeries” and adopting the bald eagle as their emblem. Unfortunately, racism was also ingrained in the organization. To become a member, an applicant had to be 21 years old, of good character, not a Communist and be of Caucasian background. The requirement to be white was removed by the late 1970s, but it remained very difficult for minorities to become members.

 

 

 

 

Why Thirty-Three?: Searching for Masonic Origins

by S. Brent Morris, PhD, Introduction by Wallace E. Boston, Jr.

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The papers presented here represent over twenty-five years of publications by S. Brent Morris. They explore his many questions about Freemasonry, usually dealing with origins of the Craft. What “high degrees” were in the United States before 1830? What were the activities in the United States before 1801 of the Order of the Royal Secret, the precursor of the Scottish Rite? How did American grand lodges form as they broke away from England? Who were the Gormogons; how did they get started; what happened to them? Why does the Scottish Rite have thirty-three degrees?A complex organization with a lengthy pedigree like Freemasonry has many basic foundational questions waiting to be answered, and that’s what this book does: answers questions.

S. Brent Morris, 33°, Grand Cross, is Managing Editor of the Scottish Rite Journal, the largest circulation Masonic magazine in the world. He retired after twenty-five years as a mathematician with the federal government and has taught at Duke, Johns Hopkins, and George Washington Universities. He is Past Master of Patmos Lodge No. 70, Ellicott City, Maryland, and Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London; a Fellow and Mackey Scholar of the Scottish Rite Research Society; a Fellow of the Philalethes Society; an honorary Fellow of the Phylaxis Society; founding Editor of Heredom, the transactions of the Scottish Rite Research Society; indexer of Ars Quatuor Coronatorum; and Past Grand Abbot of the Society of Blue Friars. He is the author of Magic Tricks, Card Shuffling, and Dynamic Computer Memories; two U.S. patents; nine technical articles; and is author or editor of over forty books on Freemasonry including Complete Idiot’s Guide to Freemasonry and Is It True What They Say About Freemasonry? (with Arturo de Hoyos).

 

 

 

 

Pioneering in Masonry: The Life and Times of Rob Morris, Masonic Poet Laureate, Together with the Story of Clara Barton and the Eastern Star

by Lucien V. Rule

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

The Early History and Antiquities of Freemasonry: As Connected with Ancient Norse Guilds, and the Oriental and Mediæval Building Fraternities

by George F. Fort

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

George Franklin Fort was born on June 30, 1809 in New Jersey and would rise to prominence in his home state. Among other things, he would serve as the Governor of New Jersey from 1851 to 1854. He began practicing medicine in 1830, but by the mid-1840s he became very involved in politics. He was largely a reform-minded candidate, and supported universal suffrage, 10-hour workdays, and ending child labor. In 1868 he left politics to practice medicine again. He passed away on April 22, 1872.

 

 

 

 

Foreign Freemasonry: Its Position vis-a-vis of Christianity and of Catholicity

by D. Moncrieff O’Connor

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

 

 

The Masonic Genius of Robert Burns: An Address Delivered in Lodge “Quatuor Coronati,” 2076, 4th March, 1892

by Bro. Benjamin Ward Richardson

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and
availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards
“more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

Robert Burns was coronated the Poet Laureate of Freemasonry in a Scottish lodge ceremony and his Masonic odes are still today recited with gusto in lodge rooms.

This new edition is dedicated to Robert Cooper, Grand Librarian of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, and helpmate to many scholars.

 

Melodies for the Craft, or Songs for Freemasons Suitable for Every Occasion

by R. Fellow

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. One subject getting renewed attention is Freemasonry. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

This edition of Ernst’s classic collection is dedicated to the brothers of St. John’s Lodge in Boston, oldest Masonic lodge in the Western Hemisphere.

 

History of Freemasonry in England from 1567 to 1813

by Leon Hyneman

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

A Place in the Lodge: Dr. Rob Morris, Freemasonry and the Order of the Eastern Star

by Nancy Stearns Theiss PhD

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UPDATED EDITION

Ridiculed as “petticoat masonry,” critics of the Order of the Eastern Star did not deter Rob Morris’ goal to establish a Masonic organization that included women as members. As Rob Morris (1818-1888) came “into the light,” he donned his Masonic apron and carried the ideals of Freemasonry through a despairing time of American history. His voluminous writing on Freemasonry and his ability to pen poems that celebrated occasions or honored the deceased earned him the title of Poet Laureate of Freemasonry in the 19th Century. An obscure figure in American history, Morris changed the world of Freemasonry making it one of the largest fraternal organizations in the world today. This book is a revised edition in the celebration of Rob Morris’ 200th year birthday, born July 31, 1818. It is based on a collection of family letters about Rob Morris’ journey in the world of Freemasonry that took him across the continents. In this revised edition, there are more letters, details about his literary contributions and images.

 

The Great Transformation: Scottish Freemasonry 1725-1810

by Dr. Mark C. Wallace

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Modern Freemasonry emerged in Britain after 1700 as a prominent fixture in both British communal and social life. It combined earlier stonemason customs and methods of organization with the popular passion for clubs and societies. Some mocked Masonic lodges and their rituals, but they were an accepted feature on the social scene, given that they avoided political and religious discussion and swore loyalty to the existing regime. The French Revolution, however, caused a severe backlash against the masons in Britain and Europe. Despite its commitment to the establishment, Freemasonry came under suspicion. By the 1790s, lodges were viewed as convenient vehicles for radical groups to pursue covert revolutionary activities. As a result, legislation was passed which attempted to regulate these societies and eradicate any traces of secrecy. This book examines the structure, nature, and characteristics of Scottish Freemasonry in its wider British and European contexts between the years 1725 and 1810. The Enlightenment effectively crafted the modern mason and propelled Freemasonry into a new era marked by growing membership and the creation of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, with the institution becoming part of the contemporary fashion for associated activity.

Dr. Mark C. Wallace is an Associate Professor of History at Lyon College. He teaches British and Scottish history, including British Imperialism, British cultural, social, and intellectual history from the fifteenth century to the present, and the Scottish Enlightenment. A former Visiting Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, he has written extensively on Scottish Freemasonry and eighteenth-century Scottish clubs and societies.

 

The 33 Principles Every Mason Should Live By: The True Meaning of Being a Mason

by C. Fred Kleinknecht Jr.

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In 1947 Fred took a job at the House of the Temple, literally learning the Scottish Rite from the ground floor to eventually becoming Grand Commander. He was Grand Commander from October 23, 1985 to October 7, 2003. Fred wanted the organization to be “first class” in all of its endeavors. He would often say “because Freemasonry lives not just for today, but for generations to come, we must be first class in whatever we do.”
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Fred rebuilt the Rite’s endowment infrastructure and helped generate forty-seven state and local Scottish Rite Foundations. Internationally Fred restored a regular Scottish Rite presence in Portugal, and established new Supreme Councils in Togo and the Ivory Coast. He reestablished the Scottish Rite in Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Russia, Slovenia, and Romania.
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Fred was a true people person making lasting friendships wherever he went and helping others along the way. Fred had a paperweight on his desk with his favorite quote:<br>
“You can accomplish much, if you don’t care who gets the credit.”
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These 33 principles are what all Freemasons should live by, they are the true meaning of Freemasonry. This book will not only benefit the Freemason but everyone can profit. I pass this along to you as a record of the Kleinknecht legacy of leadership. Also included is an appendix containing powerful messages published in the New Age / Scottish Rite Journal written by Grand Commander Kleinknecht, 33°.

 

Ritual Order of the Rainbow for Girls

by W. Mark Sexson

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. It deals with an order for girls and young women that has become worldwide.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable. Included are titles about youth movements such as Rainbow, DeMolay, and Job’s Daughters.

 

Swiss Freemasonry: A Historical Sketch with Organization, Principles and Constitution

by Dr. Bernard Perrelet

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

 

The History of the Order of the Eastern Star Among Colored People

by Mrs. S. Joe Brown

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

This volume sheds light on African-American masonic organizations. Here, Mrs. S. Joe Brown writes of the history of the Order of the Eastern Star, highlighting its developments across the United States, including Indiana, Georgia, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Minnesota, South Carolina, New York, Texas, Alabama and Washington, DC.

 

Freemasonry, Politics and Rijeka (Fiume) (1785-1944)

by Ljubinka Toseva Karpowicz

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LJUBINKA TOŠEVA KARPOWICZ studied sociology and later political science at the Faculty of Political Sciences at the University of Belgrade. She received her Ph.D. from the Faculty of Political Sciences at the University of Ljubljana in 1987. She worked as a researcher in various institutes in Yugoslavia and Croatia. Prior to publishing her first book (written with a co-author) in 1990 (Sindikalni pokret u općini Rijeka do 1941. godine (The Union Movement in the Commune of Rijeka Until 1941)), she had published numerous articles concerning the political history of the city of Rijeka in Croatia, Serbia, Italy and Germany.

During her research in the archives of larger cities in various countries (Rijeka, Belgrade, Rome, Budapest and Washington, D.C.), she noted the activities of Masons within various political entities. This gave her the impetus to devote additional research to the empirical and historical analysis of Masonry as a special political group.

The result of her work was the publication in 2007 of her book D’Annunzio u Rijeci—Mitovi, politika i uloga masonerije (D’Annunzio in Rijeka—Myths, Politics and the Role of Masonry) which covers the period 12.IX. 1919 to 12. XI.1920. The book raised great interest and Lj.T. Karpowicz then focused her research over a longer time frame on the same theme.

In addition to the foregoing books, the author also published two additional books: Pravoslavna opština u Rijeci 1720-1868 (The Orthodox Commune in Rijeka 1720 -1868) (published in 2002), and Tajne Opatije—Tajna diplomacija i obavještajne službe u Opatiji 1890-1945 (Secrets of Opatija—Secret Diplomacy and Intelligence Agencies in Opatija 1890-1945). Lj.T. Karpowicz received the Award of the City of Rijeka in 2016, the committee making the award noting that her research had encouraged further investigation into the history of the city of Rijeka and assisted in promoting the reputation of Rijeka in the world.

The book Masonerija, politika i Rijeka (1785-1944) (Freemasonry, Politics and Rijeka (1785-1944) is the result of empirical and historical analysis of the work of Masonry from various states in Rijeka’s corpus separatum, a special political body in Central Europe. It analyzes the work of Austrian, Hungarian, French and Italian Masonry through numerous decades. It focuses on the work of the Hungarian wing of the Rite of Strict Observance, whose members served as Governors of Rijeka; the work of former exiled Hungarian politicians, who were Masons, after their return from Western Europe and their role in the establishment of Austria-Hungary (the Dual Monarchy); and discusses the specifics of Masonic organization in Hungary and its contributions to the development of Hungary’s special type of liberalism.

The greater part of the work concentrates on the efforts of Italian Irredentism in Rijeka in which intellectuals and Masons from Rijeka and Italy played a leading role. Some chapters analyze the work of Italian Masonry during the Fascist era, the military coup against the Free State of Fiume and the attempts to resurrect the Free State after the fall of Fascism. The appendices and supplements contain biographies of Rijeka’s Masons, as well as a report of the American Consul concerning an attack on the Palace of the President of the Free State of Fiume, the proclamation of the Rijeka’s Fascists concerning the attack on the provisional government, and a letter from the Rijeka’s Lodge Sirius to Belgrade’s Pobratim Lodge.

 

 

Masonic Regularity and Recognition: A Global Issue

Roger Dachez, Introduction by Alain Bauer

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“The issue of regularity and recognition in Freemasonry is examined here from a mainly French point of view, because France is essentially the only major Masonic country in the world where this debate is so complicated. However, in working to re-address the matter from this specific angle, I also think that it is possible to bring out questions that go well beyond the purely French context and that might be useful for a truly global approach to the problem. I want to believe in and fervently wish for the rise of a global Masonic community that is reconciled with itself. However, this can only happen against a background of transparency and intellectual honesty. This, I hope, will be
the contribution of this modest study.”

Dr. Roger Dachez is the chairman of the Institut Alfred-Fournier in Paris. A Knight of the French Legion of Honour and of the Order of Academic Palms, he has devoted his work to cancer screening and prevention, and has contributed to the introduction and development of innovative cytopathology technologies. He is the author or co-author of many French and international publications, papers at symposia and conferences in this field. In addition, he is also a widely cited authority on Freemasonry.

 

 

 

Invasions of the Gulf: Radicalism, Ritualism and the Shaikhs

by Paul Rich

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The Gulf was ruled for a good part of the 19th and 20th centuries from India, and those who served there constituted a unique, small foreign service of their own. Their public (private boarding in American usage) school backgrounds taught them to believe in elitism and snobbery, which they passed on to their sheikhs who became obsessed with their own positions, their wealth, and rituals surrounding their majlis and the pompous titles of Highness and regal monarchy.

As Dr. Rich asks, if the British had come from ordinary schools would they have thought less about elitism and more about providing good education for their charges? Would the sheikhs have paid for education instead of thoroughbred racehorses? Would they still have treated Indians as houseboys?

The Residents did not see any incongruity between their own privileged education, and the lack of attention they paid to often appalling local conditions. If accused of neglect, the colonial rulers could reply that without them the Arabs of the Gulf would have been even worse off.

Dr. Rich’s verdict on the years of British rule is far from favourable. His conclusion is that British achievements were decidedly modest, and that a legacy was left behind which combined the worst features of Indo-British and Arab tradition. The rulers of the Gulf need to take crash courses in history, pluralism and constitutionalism if they are to survive. If the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq had brought the Gulf to its senses, then some good might have come from it. Obviously not. Perhaps the world is reaping the results of British policy that left a system in the Gulf which could not adapt, burdened by frontiers which are now questioned. Stability accompanied by social inertia was what the century and a half of British rule provided.

 

Masonic Regularity

by Alain Bernheim

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Alain Bernheim was born in Paris on May 23, 1931. At twelve he was interned in Drancy under Occupied France. After World War II was over, Bernheim studied at the National Music Conservatory of Paris, and became the first French Fulbright scholar sent to the United States, where he studied in Boston amasonic-regularityt the New England Conservatory of Music. He performed approximately 2,000 concerts and piano recitals until 1980. Bernheim was initiated in the Grand Orient of France in 1963, belongs to the Swiss Grand Lodge Alpina (Masonry Universal No. 40) and the Regular Grand Lodge of Belgium (PM Ars Macionica No. 30). In 2010 he was the first French elected active member of Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076 (United Grand Lodge of England), which he demitted in 2014 while serving as Senior Warden. In addition he is a 33° of the of the Supreme Council of the United States (Southern Jurisdiction), Visiteur Général d’Honneur of the Grand Priory of Belgium, a member of the Royal Order of Scotland and a Membre d’Honneur of the Supreme Council of France. His Masonic scholarship has earned him twice the Norman Spencer Award from QC Lodge No. 2076, the Albert Gallatin Mackey Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Scottish Rite Research Society, the Caroubi Prize from the Supreme Council of France and the Golden Acacia Special Prize at the Masonic Book Fair in Paris (2014) for the whole of his work

 

 

Getting the Third Degree: Fraternalism, Freemasonry and History

Editors: Guillermo De Los Reyes and Paul Rich

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Possibly the most international and diverse scholarly conference on fraternalism and freemasonry is the one held in Paris in the spring every two years at the Bibliotheque Nationale de France and hosted by Westphalia Press and the Policy Studies Organization. Scholars come from around the world, and the news they bring of discoveries is extraordinary. Prior to the conference itself there is a two day workshop on original documents, which meets at Musee de la Franc-Maconnerie. With growing debate over sustaining democracy in the face of alleged declining social capital, thanks to the time draining demands of social media and the epidemic of “couch potatoes,” the conferences have taken on great importance. As this engaging collection demonstrates, the doors being opened on the subject range from art history to political science to anthropology, as well as gender studies, sociology and more. The organizations discussed may insist on secrecy, but the research into them belies that. The editor, Dr. Guillermo De Los Reyes of the University of Houston, is president of the conference and no stranger to the field, having published many studies on fraternalism.

 

 

 

 

Dudley Wright: Writer, Truthseeker & Freemason

by John Belton

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Dudley Wright (1868-1950) was an Englishman who took a universalist approach to the various great Truths of Life, he travelled though many religions in his life and wrote about them all, but was probably most at home with Islam. As a professional journalist he made his living where he could. In England as Assistant Editor of The Freemason and Masonic Editor of The Times of London – and through his friendship with Joseph Fort Newton, in the USA, writing for the fabled magazine The Builder and later The Master Mason. He was one of that group of great Masonic writers that graced the American scene, unconventional enough to write well, but eventually to disband after the economic crisis that followed the Wall Street Crash of 1929. Perhaps his boldest work was to edit Gould’s 1880s History of Freemasonry, and the six volume United States version of 1936 remains the most recent complete masonic history extant.

As the son of a carriage driver Wright was always going to find it hard to become part of the establishment of late Victorian society in England. Clearly he obtained a good education but it was his passion for words and the serial exploration of various beliefs that took him to Masonic writing for a living and eventually back to Islam for his belief. The book explores the life journey of Wright through the trail of his writings.

John Belton is a well-known British researcher into the history of Freemasonry, a member of Quatuor Coronati Research Lodge in London, and Fellow of the Philalethes Society and the Masonic Society in the United States. Author of The English Masonic Union of 1813: A Tale Ancient & Modern, his main interests are in the nineteenth and especially twentieth century, and for exploring those less travelled angles to (masonic) history that are often most fascinating. He lives in an eighteenth century stone cottage in the Peak District National Park in the north of England.

 

An Introduction to the Formation of Freemasonry in the United States of America: The Constellation of the Brotherhood

by Larissa P. Watkins

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The Constellation of the Brotherhood is another stellar reference resource by bibliographer Larissa Watkins. It encompasses the developmental history of the Grand Masonic Bodies in the United States for each state… It will be a boon to researchers, Masonic libraries as well as public and university libraries and others. It promises to become a classic in the galaxy of Masonic references.

Marie M. Barnett, Librarian at the Grand Lodge of Virginia Library, Museum and Historical Foundation and its Allen E. Roberts Masonic Library and Museum in Richmond, Virginia.

“The Constellation of the Brotherhood is an invaluable resource for anyone interested in the history of the establishment of the “Grand” Masonic organizations throughout the United States. Watkins has plumbed the annual Proceedings and Transactions of hundreds of state-level Masonic bodies and distilled these primary sources into a useful reference source. The book simultaneously provides a quick guide to the establishment of Grand Lodges, Chapters, Commanderies, etc., for all fifty states and quotes original material in a way that allows the reader to feel present at the birth of each of these organizations.”

Jeffrey Croteau, Manager of Library and Archives, Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library

The Constellation of the Brotherhood is a fascinating study of the development of American Freemasonry…Here at your fingertips, bibliographer Larissa Watkins has compiled information on the formation of Masonic Grand Lodges and affiliated bodies on a state by state basis…This book should become one of the standard reference books in the overall study of American Freemasonry.

Bill Kreuger, President Emeritus, Masonic Library and Museum Association; Assistant Librarian/Curator, Iowa Masonic Library and Museums, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

The Constellation of the Brotherhood is one of those fascinating reference works that one can use as such — or a Masonic history buff can take pleasure in just reading. Indeed the Masonic Jurisdictions of the United States are a constellation, complete with stars of all sizes, their satellites and maybe even some novas — but no black holes! Bibliographer Larissa Watkins has provided us with a well laid-out and most helpful catalogue.

Glenys A. Waldman, Ph.D., President Emerita, Masonic Library and Museum Association; Librarian, Masonic Library and Museum of Pennsylvania (Grand Lodge F. & A.M. of Pennsylvania).

“Use of The Constellation is certainly not limited to Researchers or Scholars only. It would make an ideal gift for each Lodge to give a new member as a way of introducing them to the process used by each Grand Body to form themselves into a Masonic Body. It would also be useful to any Mason wishing to expand their knowledge of early Freemasonry in this Country.”

Richard E. Fletcher, PGM (VT), Executive Secretary (Ret) Masonic Service Association

 

A General Register of all the Lodges and Grand Lodges of Freemasons: in North America

by J. Fletcher Brennan

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

A Dictionary of Secret and Other Societies

by Arthur Preuss

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

A Historical Account of Columbian Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Boston

by John T. Heard

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

The Unparalleled Sufferings of John Coustos: The Cruel Tortures to Extract the Secrets of Freemasonry

by John Coustos

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

History of the Worshipful Company of Glaziers of the City of London: Otherwise the Company of Glaziers and Painters of Glass

by Charles Henry Ashdown

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Despite the name, The City of London is only a small part of metropolitan London, and is further unique in that it boasts of its own government. This centers on the ancient companies, or guilds, which in the Middle Ages held sway over the various crafts—fish mongering, goldsmithing, the fur trade, and so on—but which today have endowments to advance education, health, and other charities. It is from the members of the guilds that the Lord Mayor and other city officers are selected. The guilds do retain an interest in their trade connections of many years ago, and in this case the Glaziers, who began in 1328, still 700 years later play a part in the preservation of stained glass and in its manufacture. The literature of the guilds owes much to Victorian and Edwardian antiquaries who created valuable collections of documents now often lost. Charles Henry Ashdown wrote voluminously on castles, early armaments, and the history of St. Albans, but his volume on the glaziers is surely one of his most valuable tomes.

Freemasonry: A French View

by Roger Dachez and Alain Bauer

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BookCoverImage

Perhaps one should speak not of Freemasonry but of Freemasonries in the plural. In each country Masonic historiography has developed uniqueness, but it is safe to say that one of the highest levels of scholarship has been in France. This book is a case in point, as two of the best known French Masonic scholars present their own view of the worldwide evolution and challenging mysteries of the fraternity over the centuries.

The reader seeking to understand the origins of the world’s premier and most controversial secret society, and of the claims made for its various rites and rituals, will find this account of considerable use, as will those more informed who wish to review and reflect. Some will find that the authors have revealed too much while others will wish they had given away more. This is a valuable glimpse of what an eighteenth-century lyricist cautioned:

Who can unfold the Royal Art?
Or sing its secrets in a song?
They’re safely kept in Mason’s heart,
And to the ancient Lodge belong.

Alain Bauer is a Professor of Criminology in Paris, New York and Beijing. An adviser on many occasions to the French Government, he was Grand Master of the Grand Orient of France.

Roger Dachez is professor at the Paris Diderot University. A physician, he is President of the Institute Alfred Fournier in Paris and Secretary General of the Masonic Institute of France.

Freemasonry in the Holy Land, or, Handmarks of Hiram’s Builders

by Robert Morris, LLD.

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In 1868, Robert Morris (1818-1888), a sometime grand master of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky and founder of the Order of the Eastern Star, gathered a group of Masons for Secret Monitor ceremonies in a cave in King Solomon’s Quarries in Jerusalem. Building on that, Morris obtained a charter from the Grand Lodge of Canada in Ontario for a blue lodge to be known as Royal Solomon Mother Lodge No. 293. This apparently was the first regular lodge in what is now Israel. It did not prosper and went dark in 1907. But in the meantime, a group of Masons in Jaffa had obtained a charter from the Misraim Rite and founded a lodge known as The Port of King Solomon’s Temple, working in French. Some of the members and friends of Royal Solomon joined and the lodge still exists, a founding member of the Grand Lodge of Israel, and now known as Barkai Lodge, working in Hebrew and meeting in Tel Aviv. This volume then has considerable importance as a record of Freemasonry in the Middle East and of the role played by Morris in establishing the Craft in a region where so many of its rituals are set. It also adds a dimension to the biography of Morris, who was a prodigious writer of Masonic odes and a early proponent of women’s fraternalism.

 

Manual of the Eastern Star: Containing the Symbols, Scriptural Illustrations, Lectures, etc. Adapted to the System of Speculative Masonry

by Robert Macoy

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BookCoverImage-10The secret cyphers and ritual books of the Eastern Star as well as of other fraternal societies inevitably make their way to the shelves of antiquarian book dealers. Efforts to get families to return documents and regalia when a member dies are more often than not end in frustration. So we do have, as in the case of this Eastern Star volume, an insight into what happens in Star temples. It is a good starting place for the curious.
While the majority of its members in the United States and some other countries belong to bodies that give allegiance to the General Grand Chapter in Washington and have a uniformity in ritual, this manual illustrates that there are independent grand chapters with their own authority over ceremonies. Some examples include New York and New Jersey, Scotland, and the chapters affiliated with Prince Hall, Hiram, St John’s and other Masonic grand lodges not part of the dominant grand lodge system. An illustration is that Prince Hall chapters are an instance of retaining degrees no longer worked by General Grand Chapter.

Elixir of Empire: The English Public Schools, Ritualism, Freemasonry, and Imperialism

by P. J. Rich

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A companion volume, Chains of Empire: English Public Schools, Masonic Cabalism Historical Causality, and Imperial Clubdom, is the second in P. J. Rich’s trilogy about schooling as a political force. Explored are the ways in which the history of education contributes to political science, and the problems facing historians and educators in linking an individual’s education to behaviour. Also discussed are the implications of schools for general biography, the use of prosopographical analysis in determining schools’ influence on culture, and the importance of recent educational research for social theory.

Chains of Empire: English Public Schools, Masonic Children, Historical Causality, and Imperial Clubdom

by P. J. Rich

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The British Empire’s and the English public schools’ peculiar system of rituals BookCoverImage-7and rewards had more in common than has been realized. In Chains of Empire, Paul Rich related this to controversies about historical causality, morphic resonance, chaos, and the claims to influence of other bastions of the Imperial <i>ethos</i> such as the traditional gentlemen’s clubs of St. James’s. Rituals of Empires considers this symbolism in detail.

With the trilogy English Public Schools and Ritualistic Imperialism, Paul Rich has interjected himself into a lively controversy over the place of the English public schools in British history. Correlli Barnett blamed the English public schools for Britain’s decline, while Cyril Connolly showed that the schoolboy syndrome was a part of British social history. Dr. Rich’s trilogy concerns more than the importance of the schools to Imperial rule: it points to new directions in historiography. In his first volume -Elixir of Empire: English Public Schools, Ritualism, Freemasonry and Imperialism- he asserted that the schools espoused a ritualistic style that shaped the Empire. In Rituals of Empire, the public school symbolism reflected in the epipherma of the Empire is explored – and Dr. Rich further substantiates his assertion that Freemasonry was involved with both British Imperialism and the public schools.

Masonic Poems

by Masonic Service Association US

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Masonic poems can be maudlin or marvelous, but critics must concede that Rudyard Kipling and Robert Burns cannot be accused of being amateurs. In short, the poetry of Freemasonry is a very mixed bag. It often is on show at table lodges, which are ceremonial meals that follow the formal lodge meeting and where special very heavy cut glass, often engraved with Masonic symbols, is used to drink toasts and thump the table in prescribed rhythms. Then a lodge member will spring up to declaim one or another favorite verse.
This practice got its start in the eighteenth century or even earlier, when lodges often met at a coffee house or tavern, and when learning poems for public declamation was part of a gentleman’s portfolio of social graces. It is refreshing that the tradition continues, and these poems are proof that Masonry has had its bards.

Plain Thoughts on Secret Societies

by John Lawrence

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John Lawrence (1824-1899) was a historian of the United Brethren churches and an abolitionist. When he wrote Plain Thoughts there was a clear consensus among his feBookCoverImagellow believers that Freemasonry was insidious and diabolical. But in 1889 the United Brethren split into two denominations. Contributing to the schism was the effort of a majority of the members to soften the anti-Masonic teachings of the sect. The larger group eventually merged into the United Methodist Church. The remnant survived as the Old Constitution United Brethren, who to this day retain an anti-Masonic antipathy.

The Old Constitution churches maintain a historical center at the Brethren’s Huntington University in Indiana, with interesting holdings on the role disputes about Freemasonry have played in the evolution of the denomination, with the United Methodist Church on “the other side” of the dispute.

This edition is dedicated to Arturo de Hoyos, Grand Archivist and Grand Historian of the Scottish Rite Southern Jurisdiction, a brilliant researcher of Masonry.

Freemasonry’s Research Agenda

by Margaret C. Jacob, Preface by Paul J. Rich

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Perhaps it should not be surprising that a secret society remains something of a secret. A telling comment made on several occasions by Pierre Mollier, the librarian of the Grand Orient or premier national body of French Freemasonry, nicely summarizes the state of research into secret societies everywhere, and particularly those movements related to Freemasonry – the neeBookCoverImage-2d to take Masonic history out of the ghetto. Pierre remarks in this regard that it is “quite peculiar” that the two most important historians of French Masonry in the late twentieth century were not Masons, Pierre Chevallier and Alain Le Bihan. Coincidentally, perhaps the two most important historians working in English in the late twentieth century were (and are) Margaret Jacob and David Stevenson, neither of them being Masons. Quite possibly Masonic authors, a phrase Mollier uses in preference to the more complimentary Masonic historian, with a few exceptions, have been in that ghetto and not able to make the contributions that those who are more removed and hence more objective could make. So the subject is that academic rarity: understudied and under researched.

The history of secret and ritualistic organizations is complicated not only by arcane and deliberately obtuse language but also by the fact that despite the authorities such as Professor Jacob, the subject has never received the attention from mainstream scholars that it merits. This is among other reasons quite possibly because of the major bibliographical problems such as limited private publication that are presented even at a national level, let alone the failure to preserve local materials. Individual lodge histories generally appear in editions of a couple hundred copies and are only for the membership. They are not present in the British Library or the Library of Congress. Nor are they of academic quality. The subject really deserves but seldom gets a global perspective. Remarks Michel Brodsky, “The level of research within the Craft is low, and mostly concerns the local history of lodges or remembrance of folk heroes.”i Still, the general calibre of research by non Masons is often little better than that done by Masons.

The Symbolic Tradition of Freemasonry

Edited by Pierre Mollier

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This volume, full of significant work on Freemasonry and kindred subjects, is the result of a bold effort to make the best in articles about fraternalism appearing in tonguesother than English available to the English-speaking scholarly world. The productivity and sophistication of researchers in Europe has meant that important progress in the field has been neglected because of the language barrier. Bridging that gap, Pierre Mollier has brought to the editorship of the series his enormous knowledge as museum director, rare book librarian, and top archivist.
The ecumenical goal of the project is shared with the World Conference on Fraternalism, meeting in Paris every two years in cooperation with the Bibliotheque nationale de France and the Museum of Freemasonry.

Challenges Facing Freemasonry

by John L.L. Cooper III, Preface by Paul J. Rich

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Secrecy and ritualism often go together, although for many societies the secrecy is no longer as strong as it once was. However, ritual remains one of their major characteristics, making them distinct from a large number of other groups that may have a few ceremonies such as passing along the chair’s gavel or investing new members with lapel pins but which are chiefly issue-oriented. Sometimes it is hard to demarcate between a ritualistic and issue-oriented movement. While the Grange, for example, is certainly an agricultural lobby, it has always had a strong ritualistic side. Rotary or the Lions would seem to be more on the service side, but we have all met members who were as enraptured by the Rotary Wheel as anyone ever was by the Masonic square and compass. All of this presents special challenges to understanding.

As Dr. Cooper points out, there can be a change in emphasis over the years. But for all the changes, few public or university libraries take seriously the collecting of material on the Masons, so the serious researcher must get permission to use Masonic archives and libraries. A number date from the nineteenth century and have large holdings. An idea of what they might contain is indicated by the classifications of the Library of the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite in Washington, which dates back to 1888 and even then had more than eight thousand volumes. Categories include philosophy and symbolism, church and state, paraphernalia, glassware, benevolent and educational institutions, hospitals, cemeteries, architecture, poetry and drama, humor and satire, and women in Masonry. Paris is unique in having at least four major collections.

Another challenge is understanding the special language and usages that an organization such as the Masons invokes. The more ritualistic the society, the more arcane will be the terminology found in papers. As an example, a considerable problem for the researcher is the dating system used by different Masonic bodies. Ordinary Craft or blue lodge Masons who have taken the first three degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellowcraft and Master Mason use the Anno Lucis system, adding 4000 years and giving the year as dated from the Creation. Thus a blue lodge Masonic document of 1995 would be 5995. Royal Arch Masons begin the calendar with the start of work on the Second Temple at Jerusalem in 530 B.C., so that this is the year 2525. Royal and Select Masters number the years from the completion of the original King Solomon’s Temple in 1000 B.C., making this the year 2995. Masonic Knights Templar date documents from the founding of the Order in 1118 and hence this is 877. There are other pitfalls: On occasion the researcher will face documents that have been rendered into cipher or have had critical words removed. He or she will also encounter vast amounts of allegory and metaphor, so that without an advance immersion in the rituals the text will be unintelligible.

Stories for the American Freemason’s Fireside

by C. W. Towle

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This is a collection of stories intended to be morality tales for Masons and their admirers. Numerous nineteenth century writers saw a market for fiction whose intention was to inculcate the values of a popular, redefined Freemasonry. The result was a folklore that has been likenedBookCoverImage-12 to a Disney version of the Craft.

While there are a variety of themes presented, Victorian values of family and chivalry appear in contrast with previous Masonic imagery that drew on the Enlightenment. The invoking of nature is seen in pieces like “Blue Hyacinth”, “The Countryside”, “An Autumnal Thought”, and “The Moonlight on the Mound”. The sentimentalism was new to the fraternity and became ritualistically incorporated in auxiliaries such as the Eastern Star and Amaranth.

Ritual and Secrecy Confront Reality

Edited by by Pierre Mollier, Daniel Kerjan, Yves Hilvert-Messeca, and Carter Charles

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This special issue of Ritual, Secrecy and Civil Society, among other things, questions explores the ways in which the secret initiatory societies interface with political and social history. It would be a great mistake to think that organizations such as Freemasonry are confined to metaphorics and mythologies. Through the years, as the articles in these pages make clear, rule by ritual is more the norm than the exception. Rather than by gunpowder, many moments in history have been determined by the cadences of rite and ritual. Flags carry armies into battle.

As Pierre Mollier well remarks in his introduction to this volume, Anglo-Saxon FreeBookCoverImage-10masonry has often proposed that it “does not do politics.” That will surprise historians of Mexico who have to explain that the country’s first civil war was between York and Scottish Rite Masons, or students of American political parties who note that the first organized political party was the Anti-Masonic. A comprehensive article on the Mormon religious movement, the Church of Jesus Christ of Later Day Saints, provides another example in these pages of the relevance of Masonry to broader issues. In sum then, an effort to wall off ritualistic fraternalism from broader social and geopolitical issues is doomed. Like other recent viewpoints such as gender studies and racial studies, ritual studies are an important help to our understanding of the world, not a footnote.

Not do politics! At times Freemasonry has been just about as political as it is possible to be. That may make some of its proponents squirm, but the research presented here shows just how involved with the hurly-burly of our everydays this fascinating subject can be.

Pierre Mollier is a graduate of the Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris (“Sciences-Po”) and the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes of the Sorbonne. He is editor of Renaissance Traditionelle and contributes to Politica Hermetica and Farliro. He is an authority on the French painter Jean-Fraçois Garneray. Pierre Mollier is the Director of Library, Archives, and Museum of the grand Orient of France, with a special scholarly interest in the First Empire and the Third Republic.

Fiat Lux: Full Score, Parts Included

Composed by by Gregory Thomas Woolford Martin

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Gregory Thomas Woolford Martin has composed for small and BookCoverImage-1large ensembles, electronica, choir, film, theater, dance and orchestra. He has received grants from Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, New York State Council for the Arts, and the Eugene and Agnes Meyer Foundation, and scored numerous plays in the DC metro area, credited as Gregg Martin. His compositons for Shakespeare radio adaptations have been broadcast on WAMU, and he both composed and wrote the libretto for his opera Life in Death performed at the Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage and at the Capital Fringe Festival. As a musicologist his writings are on the subjects of music technology and aesthetics. He is married to the writer Pamela Woolford Martin and has two children, Tara and Riley.

Between Conflict and Conformity: Freemasonry During the Weimar Republic and the “Third Reich”

Authored by Ralf Melzer
Translated by Glenys A. Waldman

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FreeFreemasonry During the Weimar Republic and the masonry during the Weimar Republic and the ‘Third Reich’…One might ask, “Is that a chapter of forgotten persecution or a legend of persecution?” After extensive research in archives in Berlin, Moscow, and Washington, D.C., the author has determined that the answer would have to be: “Neither, nor; yet some of both.” The history of the German Masonic lodges and their members in the Weimar Republic and the “Third Reich” is a story of conflict and conformity.

Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia – 1898

by John P. Sheiry

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The Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia is not the grand lodge for the United States, but at times because of its site it has national importance. The election of Brother William McKinley as president in 1896 was the beginning of an extraordinarily visible era for Freemasonry in Washington, wheProceedings of the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia ~ 1898n its profile and processions were enhanced by the fact that Masons would occupy the White House for the majority of the next fifty-six years.

Six out of the nine presidents in that period were members of the Craft: William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, Warren Harding, Franklin Roosevelt, and Harry Truman. So this volume concerns arguably a high water mark in the fraternity’s history. The statue for Albert Pike, the Scottish Rite leader, was authorized by Congress in 1898 and still occupies Judiciary Square.

The Presidents of the United States during these years who were Masons participated frequently in Grand Lodge events during their time in Washington. Each had a particular connection that is worth noting. For example, William McKinley (President 1897-1901) had joined when he saw that Confederates who were Masons and wounded during the Civil War were given friendly treatment by Union surgeons. He became a Capitular Mason and Life Member of Washington Commandery No.1, D.C. on December 23, 1896. From the White House steps, on several occasions, Brother McKinley reviewed Knight Templars on parade. He received Grand Master William Henderson and a Grand Lodge delegation to accept membership in Columbia Lodge made a point to visit his Mother Lodge in Winchester, Virginia. He also participated in the Masonic centennial observances of the death of George Washington, on December 14, 1899.