Storia del Grande Oriente d’Italia (Italian Edition)

by Emanuela Locci

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Questo volume è la traduzione italiana di un libro precedente nato con l’intento di colmare una lacuna bibliografica, infatti, fino alla sua pubblicazione non era presente nella letteratura massonica un libro che trattasse in maniera organica la storia della massoneria in Italia, scritto in inglese. Questo volume si proponeva di eliminare questa mancanza e di far conoscere a una parte del mondo, quella che si rifà alla lingua anglosassone, la storia della più importante delle Obbedienze che operano in Italia: il Grande Oriente d’Italia.

Il libro nasce dall’unione delle competenze di giovani ricercatori italiani che si occupano di massoneria e si sono incontrati in occasione del primo seminario promosso dal Centro Ricerche Storiche sulla Libera Muratoria che si è tenuto a Torino nel 2017 e che hanno deciso di mettere il loro sapere e la loro professionalità al servizio della storia e di questo libro.

 

Worlds of Print: The Moral Imagination of an Informed Citizenry, 1734 to 1839

by John Slifko

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Plato, Aristotle, Baron Montesquieu, and Jean Jacques Rousseau argued that you could never have a democracy bigger than the geographic size, intimate oral habits, and embodied rituals of face-to-face communication, and walking distance of a Greek city-state, French town, or small Swiss city. However, in the years surrounding the 1776 American War of Independence and accelerating into the 1800s in the American northeast and mid-Atlantic, there was a significant cultural transformation in the transition from oral/aural cultures to an increasingly literate citizenry. A consequence of this transition was an expanded geographical range of democratic engagement. In this book, John Slifko argues that freemasonry was representative and played an important role in this transformation and helped articulate the moral imagination of an informed democratic citizenry via fast emerging worlds of print.

A metamorphosis occurred through worlds of print anchored at home in the routine lives of local community and transmission in space across networks of place. Communication and political participation were enhanced in early America through a growing range of print vehicles such as pamphlets, newspapers, declarations and books of all types concerned with ancient and modern learning. The formation of local civic associations and reading libraries further contributed to this growth of available print documents. This work examines the vital roles that freemasons played in this print transformation.

About the Author:

John Slifko (1950-2018) was an expert in the fields of Freemasonry and Esotericism. He dedicated much of his scholarly and charitable work to studying democratic civil societies.

In 2015, John was awarded the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Geography from University of California, Los Angeles. He completed a joint Bachelor’s degree in Urban Planning and Geography in 1987 from San Francisco State and a Master’s degree in 1989 from University of California, Los Angeles in Urban Planning. John worked as a Planning Deputy for the Los Angeles City Council and as a Legislative Aide Field Representative for the United States Congress.

He was a founding member and served on the Board of Advisors at the Hannah Mather Crocker Society, Notre Dame University. He was also a Founder and co-Director of the Roosevelt Center for the Study of Civil Society and Freemasonry and Project AWE, which is dedicated to exploring connections between Western esotericism and the arts.

John was described by Zhenya Gershman, an Artist and Art Historian, as someone who “had a thirst for knowledge and a striving for improvement of life conditions for others that continues to be contagious. The concept of ‘Moral Imagination’ represented to John a combination of the reverie for artistic creativity with simultaneous responsibility for the world”.

 

Masonry and Protestantism

by Susanna Hopkins Mason

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.John J. Lanier was a self-described, Masonic Lecturer, and author of numerous books on Masonic culture, including The Master Mason, Masonry and Citizenship, and Washington, the Great American Mason.

 

Annals of the Hobby Club of New York City, 1912-1920

by New York Hobby Club

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In 1908, the Hobby Club was established as a gentlemen’s club. Planned to be a space for people to showcase their special interests, the “object of the Club shall be to encourage the collection of literary, artistic and scientific works; to aid in the development of literary, artistic and scientific matters; to promote social and literary intercourse among its members, and the discussion and consideration of various literary and economic subjects.”

Only a maximum of fifty men were allowed to be members, and in order to gain admission to the club, one had to prove they had an interesting, well defined hobby. Members gathered around extravagant dinners while each regaled one another with collections, tales and other displays of their findings.

This work offers some insight on the club, especially membership, topics of talks, and details on the dinners they shared.

 

 

 

Proceedings of the General Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star at its Fourth Stated Meeting, August 17-23, 1883

by General Grand Chapter

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

Although the Order of the Eastern Star at one time claimed ties to orders in the seventeenth and eighteenth century Swedish royal court, the consensus is that it was largely created as a companion secret society to Freemasonry in thenineteenth century. Both men who are Masons and women with a family connection to Masons are members, and chapters are found as far afield as Scotland and Australia.

 

 

 

 

An Address Delivered Before the Members of the Anti-Masonic State Convention: Assembled at Augusta, Maine, July 4, 1832

by Moses Thacher

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Moses Thacher was born on November 14, 795 in Princeton, Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was frustrated with the growing number of people involved with Freemasonry in his religious community. He felt the oats one swore as part of Masonic ritual were incompatible with religious doctrine. It became a serious issue for Thacher, so much so that he felt it destroyed the character of his Christian church. He was not alone, as numerous other people left their church to join one that prohibited Freemasonry. He penned a few anti-Masonic tracts, including, “Masonic oaths neither morally nor legally binding” and “Reasons assigned by the Church in North Wrentham for withdrawing from their masonic brethren and others and being formed into a distinct and seperate church.” On July 21, 1878, at the age of 82, Thacher passed away in Cambridge, Henry County, Illinois.

 

 

 

History of Saint John’s Lodge of Boston

by Saint John’s Lodge Freemasons

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Saint John’s is the oldest lodge in the United States and its social history when fully written will be a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. Fraternal organizations like Saint John’s have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by inattention form scholars and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects.As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable. This volume about a famous lodge with a grand history is a case in point.