Journal of a Trip to California: Across the Continent from Weston, Mo., to Weber Creek, Cal., in the Summer of 1850

by C. W. Smith, by R. W. Vail

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Found in the litter of a storeroom was a small 4×6 notebook bound in leather. The notebook contained pressed flowers, plants, and the story of C. W. Smith’s journey to California. C. W. Smith’s father, William Smith, came to the United States from England in 1831 and lived near Victor, NY. After gold was discovered in California, C. W. made his way out west in 1850. The journal begins when C.W. arrives in Centreville, Indiana. This works offers an interesting look at the Gold Rush and in particular, the Overland Trail.

Robert William Glenroie Vail (1890-1966) wrote the brief introduction to this work. He was born in Victor, NY, but worked in Minnesota, and then New York City for the bulk of his life, as an editor, collector, lecturer, writer, historian, director and bibliographer.

This new edition is dedicated to John Cooper, Bibliophile and Freemason.

From Slavery to Wealth, The Life of Scott Bond: The Rewards of Honesty, Industry, Economy and Perseverance

by Daniel Arthur Rudd

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Scott Bond was born into slavery in Madison County, Mississippi. Due to the inhumanity of slavery, Bond’s exact birth year is not known, outside from being sometime in the early 1850s. Despite the intolerable cruelties Bond faced, he went on to become a high powered farmer and entrepreneur. He was extremely highly regarded both locally, and nationally for his skilled business acumen. He was selected to represent the National Negro Business League. Sadly, in 1933, Bond was killed by one of his bulls. At the time of his passing, he owned and farmed 12,000 acres, plus livestock, ran a large mercantile store, a gravel pit, lumber yard, saw mill and at least five cotton gins.

Biographer Daniel Arthur Rudd was a highly esteemed activist, author, founder of the Black Catholic Congress Movement, and editor and publisher of The American Catholic Tribune. He accomplished a great deal despite having been born into slavery in 1854 in Bardstown, Kentucky. By 1866, Rudd was emancipated and receiving an education while living in Springfield, Illinois. He worked as an accountant for Scott Bond. The book is co-authored with Theophilus Bond, who was Scott Bond’s second born son.

The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America: Volume II

by John Fiske

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John Fiske was born on March 30, 1842 in Hartford, Connecticut as Edmund Fiske Green. Fiske was raised by his paternal grandmother who enjoyed an excellent education, learning Latin and Greek at a very early age, moving on to other languages as a teen, including Spanish, Hebrew and Sanskrit. He attended law school at Harvard, and opened up a practice in Boston in 1865. He quickly found he preferred teaching, and changed professions, focusing first on promoting the theory of evolution.

Fiske’s writings were praised for being readable and interesting, and the good reception spurred him on to pen many works. In addition to writing for popular publications, such as Atlantic Monthly, he wrote many popular books, including Myths and Mythmakers, The Discovery of America, and books intended for younger audiences, such as The War of Independence. He was a world famous historian, philosopher and educator when he passed away in East Glouchester, Massachusetts on July 4, 1901.

This new edition is dedicated to Lew Taylor, able editor and energetic historian.

The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America: Volume I

by John Fiske

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John Fiske was born on March 30, 1842 in Hartford, Connecticut as Edmund Fiske Green. Fiske was raised by his paternal grandmother who enjoyed an excellent education, learning Latin and Greek at a very early age, moving on to other languages as a teen, including Spanish, Hebrew and Sanskrit. He attended law school at Harvard, and opened up a practice in Boston in 1865. He quickly found he preferred teaching, and changed professions, focusing first on promoting the theory of evolution.

Fiske’s writings were praised for being readable and interesting, and the good reception spurred him on to pen many works. In addition to writing for popular publications, such as Atlantic Monthly, he wrote many popular books, including Myths and Mythmakers, The Discovery of America, and books intended for younger audiences, such as The War of Independence. He was a world famous historian, philosopher and educator when he passed away in East Glouchester, Massachusetts on July 4, 1901.

This new edition is dedicated to Lew Taylor, able editor and energetic historian.

Shakespeare and the Makers of Virginia: Annual Shakespeare Lecture, 1919

by Adolphus William Ward

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Adolphus William Ward was born on December 2, 1837 in London to a family of means. His father, John Ward, was an English diplomat. After his schooling, he being a professor of history and literature at Owens College. He also helped to found Victoria University and Withington Girls’ School. Additionally, he was the president of Royal Historical Society from 1899-1901. In 1913, he was knighted.He wrote a great deal, but arguably his most famed work is History of English Dramatic Literature to the Age of Queen Anne (1875). He edited many works as well, including the Cambridge History of English Literature, alongside A. R. Waller.

 

 

 

Quaker Women, 1650-1690

by Mabel Richmond Brailsford

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Mabel Richmond Brailsford was not a Friend, but this work is considered to be truthful, extremely well researched, and also sympathetic. Brailsford did extensive research at the Library at Devonshire House in order to complete the portraits of numerous Quaker women, such as Margaret Fell, Barbara Blaugdone, Elizabeth Hooton, Elizabeth Fletcher, Jane Stuart, and Mary Fisher. The biographies paint a picture of the power that women held within the Quaker community, as opposed to other religious denominations at the time. It also offers a lot of information on the individual travels, writings, experiences, and also systemic failures that each of these women faced. Some have argued this is as much an adventure story as it is a set of biographies. She gives an excellent early history of both Quakers and England between 1650-1690.

Brailsford wrote a great deal, including other works on Quakers, such as The Making of William Penn (1930). She often focused on religions and figures within those movements, such as Susanna Wesley, the mother of Methodism, A Quaker from Cromwell’s army: James Nayler, and A Tale of Two Brothers: John and Charles Wesley.

 

 

 

The Spanish Borderlands: A Chronicle of Old Florida and the Southwest

by Herbert E. Bolton

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The Spanish Borderlands focuses on the areas between Florida and California, and the influence that Spanish conquistadores held. The work is broken into two sections, with the first highlighting exploration of the region by Spaniards, and the latter half of the book looking at these areas as colonies. Bolton examines the complex relationships between Spaniards, the numerous individual Native American tribes in the colonized regions, and other colonizing bodies, such as the French.Herbert E. Bolton (1870-1953) was an American historian who examined history through a complex lens over time, rather than as an isolated force, as was popular with historians like Frederick Jackson Turner whom Bolton studied under. Bolton found it crucial to examine the variety of people, along with their cultures, histories and motivations and its impact on the fabric of the United States. Early in his career, Bolton taught early European history at the University of Texas, but after research in Mexico he turned his focus towards the Spanish colonization of the Americas. In 1911, he became a professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley, with his specialty being the History of the Americas.

 

This new edition is dedicated to Daniel Tapia Quintana, Harvardian, shrewd observer of the border and its political and social anomalies.

 

 

 

 

Joseph Stebbins: A Pioneer at the Outbreak of the Revolution

by George Sheldon

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This is an account of one person’s dilemmas during the American Revolution and its aftermath. Joseph Stebbins was born in 1749. He was thrust into the conflict as captain of a militia company of soldiers from Deerfield, Massachusetts. Many colonists experienced mixed emotions about the war, its need and likelihood of success. This work shows Stebbins as a powerful figure galvanizing support for the Revolutionary War in his community.

After the conclusion of the war, colonists faced another difficult task: contrary opinions about the course of the new nation. Conflicting ideals led to Shays Rebellion as Daniel Shays was joined by thousands of fellow citizens in Western Massachusetts in a fight against excessive taxation. Stebbins opposed Shays Rebellion, and for his support, the Massachusetts government rewarded him by promotion to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in 1786. The following year, he became a full colonel. Confirmed in his views by the course of history, he died in 1816.

 

Dogs in Early New England

by Howard M. Chapin

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Howard M. Chapin’s interesting and unusual study offers a look at dogs in the New England region during the 1600-1700s. He offers accounts derived from both Native Americans and incoming settlers, and includes archival evidence and photographs of artifacts. A dog fancier himself, Chapin sheds some light on a somewhat arcane and understudied aspect of animals in the early United States. This is one of the few studies of dogs in the colonial era and provides a foundation for further investigation.

Howard Millar Chapin was a prolific writer who was especially fond of colonial American history. He was born in 1887 and attended Brown University, graduating in 1908, and then went into business, running his own jewelry store. Later he worked as a manager at the Providence Evening News, and in 1912, he became the Librarian of the Rhode Island Historical Society, until his passing in 1940.

 

The Unwritten History of Old St. Augustine

by A. M. Brooks, Translated by Annie Averette

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This work was written and researched by A. M. Brooks, who was born as Abbie M. Brooks, but also wrote as Sylvia Sunshine. She wrote a great deal about Florida, including the work, Petals Plucked From Sunny Climes, which is a highly acclaimed and well researched account of the Florida area prior to the 1870s. This work, The Unwritten History of St. Augustine, is the culmination of a very daunting task, going through five huge volumes of records regarding the development of Florida found in the archives in Seville, Spain. Yet, for all of her hard work, little is known about the life and history of A. M. Brooks. Perhaps ironically, she was always tracking the past, but leaving very little of her own behind, save for her writings.

Middle East Reviews: Second Edition

Editors: Mohammed M. Aman PhD and Mary Jo Aman, MLIS

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About the Editors
Mohammed M. Aman, PhD is current Professor (Dean from 1979 to 2002) at the School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM), Interim Dean, School of Education (2000-2002), and Editor-in-Chief of the peer-reviewed journal, Digest of Middle East Studies (DOMES), published by Wiley-Blackwell. He is the author of scholarly books and journal articles.

Mary Jo Aman, MLIS is Associate Editor of the Digest of Middle East Studies (DOMES). She held management positions at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and prior to UWM, held positions at the Viking Press, Nassau County, N.Y. Library System, Brooklyn Public Library; Board Member of the International Board of Books for Young People (IBBY), and Editor of its quarterly Newsletter.

About the Book
The book brings together reviews of books published on the Middle East and North Africa during the period 2015 to 2018, thus supplementing the earlier edition published in 2016 that covers reviews from 2011 to 2014. The book is a valuable addition to Middle East literature, and will provide an informative read for experts and non-experts on the MENA countries. As with the first edition, this volume covers signed book reviews that cover subjects on the humanities, philosophy, religion, social sciences, history, arts, and literature. Together, the two volumes should serve as valuable sources for current literature on the MENA region and the subjects of interests to readers on the region.

 

Donald J. Trump’s Presidency: International Perspectives

Editors: John Dixon and Max J. Skidmore

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President Donald J. Trump’s foreign policy rhetoric and actions become more understandable by reference to his personality traits, his worldview, and his view of the world. His campaign rhetoric catered to Americans comfortable with isolationism and certainly with no appetite for foreign military engagements. So, his foreign policy emphasis was on American isolationism and economic nationalism. He is not really interested in delving too deeply into some of the substantive issues of international politics, particularly the prevailing quandaries in the East Asia, Middle East and North Africa, and Central and Eastern Europe. Why bother when simple solutions will suffice, for his purposes. He has placed America’s global superpower status at risk. The gradual decline of its global influence seems inevitable.

Companion volume: John Dixon, Donald J. Trump as U.S. President: “It’s all about me!” (Westphalia Press, Washington, DC, 2018).

John Dixon is Professor of Public Administration at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. He is a fellow of the British Academy of the Social Sciences in 2004, and has been an honorary life member of the American Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars since 2006.

Max J. Skidmore is University of Missouri’s Curators’ Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Thomas Jefferson Fellow at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He has been Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer to India, and Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong.

American Prophets of Peace: Souvenir of the National Arbitration and Peace Congress, New York, April 1907

by National Arbitration and Peace Congress

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When the Peace Congress was proposed, it was considered “the greatest gathering ever held in advocacy of the abolition of war as a means of settling international disputes, and the most important non-political gathering ever held in this country for any purpose.” The Congress was supported by a notable group, including Andrew Carnegie, which served as its president, along with numerous religious figures, editors, educators, the American Federation of Labor, the National Association of Manufacturers, and other organizations. Sadly, World Wars I, II, and the numerous wars between and after have proven the eradication of international war to be so far an elusive dream. However, documents like this offer some scaffolding and inspiration for future talks in establishing world peace.

 

The Huguenots in France: After the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes with Memoirs of Distinguished Huguenot Refugees, and A Visit to the Country of Voudois

by Samuel Smiles

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The Huguenots are French Protestants, a denomination that began during the early sixteenth century. Their place in French society oscillated between their being celebrated and defamed. On August 24, 1572, while marking Saint Bartholomew’s Day, thousands of Huguenots were massacred. After decades of fighting occurred, a guarantee of peace was issued, which largely remained in place until October 18, 1685 when Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes. Many Huguenots fled France to escape persecution, and settled in various places, such as the United States, England, Sweden, Denmark, and Switzerland.

Samuel Smiles (1812 – 1904), was a Scottish social reformer, parliamentarian, and prolific author. He promoted frugality and asserted that poverty was caused largely by irresponsible habits, which may help account for his admiration of the Huguenot culture of industry and entrepreneurship.

 

Demand the Impossible: Essays in History as Activism

Editors: Nathan Wuertenberg and William Horne

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Born from the wave of activism that followed the inauguration of President Trump, Demand the Impossible asks scholars what they can do to help solve present-day crises. The twelve essays in this volume draw inspiration from present-day activists. They examine the role of history in shaping ongoing debates over monuments, racism, clean energy, health care, poverty, and the Democratic Party. Together they show the ways that the issues of today are historical expressions of power that continue to shape the present. Adequately addressing them means understanding their origins.

The way our society remembers the past has long served to cement inequality. It is no accident that the ahistorical slogan “make America great again” emerged after decades of income inequality and a generation of funding cuts to higher education. But the movement toward openly addressing injustice and inequality though historical inquiry is growing. Although many historians remain tucked away in ivory towers of their own making, we join a long tradition of activist scholars like W.E.B. Du Bois, C.L.R. James, and C. Vann Woodward, as well as a growing wave of engaged colleagues including Keri Leigh Merritt, who penned the foreword for this volume. As historians and citizens, we feel a responsibility to preserve an authentic vision of the past in a moment riddled with propaganda and lies. In doing so, we hope to help provide a framework to fight the inequities we inherited from prior generations that are repurposed and enshrined by the powerful today.

Nathan Wuertenberg is a doctoral candidate at The George Washington University. He is conducting research for a doctoral dissertation on the 1775 American invasion of Quebec, entitled “Divided We Stand: The American War for Independence, the 1775 Quebec Campaign, and the Rise of Nations in the Twilight of Colonial Empires.” William Horne is a PhD candidate at The George Washington University researching the relationship of race to labor, freedom, and capitalism in post-Civil War Louisiana. His dissertation, “Carceral State: Baton Rouge and its Plantation Environs Across Emancipation,” examines the ways in which white supremacy and capitalism each depended on restricting black freedom in the aftermath of slavery.

 

Palaces of Sin, or The Devil in Society

by Col. Dick Maple

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“Colonel” Dick Maple was the fanciful pen name for Seth McCallen, who penned a great many highly polemical works. He wrote this particular work against alcohol and nightlife. In particular, he guards readers against women in corsets, who drink or otherwise dabble in lifestyles or actions he finds unseemly. The women in his stories often come to sad endings as a result of their desire to enjoy equal opportunities with men in vice and pleasure. McCallen was far from a person anyone should take seriously. He is known for writing and publishing some of the most extraordinarily vile and racist diatribes in The National Rip-Saw. In 1910, McCallen had a stroke, but the publisher hired W. S. Morgan in order to imitate his hateful style. Thankfully, the style and messages were so unappealing and subscriptions dropped so low that the magazine had to send issues to random addresses to fulfill advertising terms.

 

Secrets & Lies in the United Kingdom: Analysis of Political Corruption

by Fabienne Portier-Le Cocq

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Secrets & Lies in the United Kingdom: Analysis of Political Corruption lifts the shroud of secrecy in the United Kingdom in relation to modern freemasonry in Scotland in the late-18th century, the ‘Stolen Generations’ in Australia from the early 1900s to the late 1970s, Enoch Powell’s motives for resigning, Britain’s secret plan for a nuclear power station in Wales, intentional and unintentional disclosures of secret information about the Liberal Democrats and their rivals, the ‘culture of secrecy’ of English police forces, and the paradoxical co-existence of secrecy and transparency in the English justice system.

Editor Fabienne Portier-Le Cocq is Professor of Contemporary British Studies at the University of Tours, France, and conducted research for the European Commission (Daphne II programme) for four years. She authored Sexualités et maternités des adolescentes : Voix anglaises et écossaises (Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2009), co-authored Les Politiques de jeunesse au Royaume-Uni et en France (Presses Sorbonne nouvelle, 2012), and has recently edited Fertility, Health and Lone Parenting: European Contexts (Routledge, 2017). She is currently preparing a book on motherhood in the global context.

 

A Frenchman in the Gold Rush: The Journal of Ernest De Massey, Argonaut of 1849

by Ernest De Massey, Translated by Marguerite Eyer Wilbur

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Ernest De Massey arrived in the United States in 1849. He went to San Francisco, and became a retailer, since he had the capital and came from some wealth. However, the lure of the Gold Rush was too much for him, so he decided to close his shop and follow many of his customers into the mountains in hopes of striking it rich. He tried prospecting in multiple areas, including Klamath River. Like many, he left with empty pockets and dashed dreams, though he was very fortunate to have kept his health. Prospecting was very arduous, and frequently dangerous. De Massey only lasted five months before giving up, after falling seriously ill. He decided to return to San Francisco and the somewhat more stable life of an entrepreneur. But in 1857 he returned to Europe. De Massey’s fascinating first hand account illustrates how the Gold Rush mesmerized so many.

 

The Etchings of Rembrandt: A Study and History

by P. G. Hamerton

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Philip Gilbert Hamerton (1834-1894) was an Englishman who was devoted to the arts in numerous forms. He became an orphan at the age of ten; his mother died giving birth to him, and he ended up living with two aunts when he turned five. Five years after that, his father died. At first, he tried his hand at poetry, but his work was not well received. He moved onto painting, in particular, landscape painting. However, his work was also not well-received. On a more positive note, while he was painting in the Scottish Highlands, he met his wife, Eugénie Gindriez. While his painting and poetry was not fawned over, his book, Painter’s Camp in the Highlands, published in 1863, was lauded. Due to the praise, Hamerton stuck with art criticism, and went on to write other works, such as Etching and Etchers (1866) and Contemporary French Painters (1867). He also wrote novels, biographies, and reflections on society.

This new edition is dedicated to Gordon Alt, whose energetic lifelong efforts for the arts have saved many important works that otherwise would have perished.

 

 

The Capture and Execution of John Brown: A Tale of Martyrdom

by Elijah Avey

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Slavery was truly an awful institution that, even today in its legacy, continues to plague the United States. During its height, abolitionists “waved the bloody flag” and vigorously protested to end it, though it took plunging the nation into the Civil War to result in it being finally eradicated. One person that took a powerful stand against “the peculiar institution” was John Brown. Though Brown had led forces against pro-slavery opponents earlier, it wasn’t until 1859 when he grabbed the national stage by leading forces, particularly enslaved African Americans, at Harper’s Ferry. The movement was ultimately unsuccessful, and Brown was captured and tried for treason against the Commonwealth of Virginia (before Harper’s Ferry was part of West Virginia). He was hanged despite vocal opposition from his supporters. Yet, his work as an abolitionist created ripples of tension that significantly fueled the drift towards war. This work is written by Elijah Avery, who offers a detailed, eyewitness account of the events, and contextualizes John Brown’s life.

This new edition is dedicated to the efforts of the American Public University System to preserve the artifacts of historic Charles Town in West Virginia with its associations with John Brown.

 

The History of Men’s Raiment

by The Edson Lewis Company

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Strouse & Brothers, originating out of Baltimore, published this unique tract on the history of men’s fashion in the European world. The work begins with a very brief history of fashion, and then links the Strouse & Brothers firm to that history of high quality fashion. It offers a fascinating look at early forms of advertising in the United States, and of course, fashion and changing tastes. Strouse & Brothers considered itself a purveyor of “High Art fashion.” The high quality illustrations included reveal that “High Art fashion” has developed very different meanings over the years. For Strouse & Brothers, it simply meant well-tailored suits paired with fashionable hats in 1910. Strouse & Brothers enjoyed a long history in Baltimore, becoming one of the largest clothiers in the city. It was founded in 1868 by Leopold Strouse, one of six brothers who emigrated from Germany to the United States.

 

The Prisoners of 1776: A Relic of the Revolution

by Rev. R. Livesey

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Most of this work is not by Rev. R. Livesey, but rather by Charles Herbert, who was made prisoner by the English during the Revolutionary War. The journal begins around November 15, 1776, shortly after Herbert was captured while on the brigantine, Dolton. While imprisoned, he suffered from smallpox, but recovered and then was sent to Old Mill Prison, located in Plymouth, England, in 1777. He was held there until March 19, 1779, when he was exchanged for English prisoners. Herbert tried to escape many times, and even succeeded once, but he, along with a majority of other prisoners, were recaptured. After his release, Herbert went on to be married to Holly Butler on November 8, 1783, and earned a living as a block-maker, until he died at the age of 49 on September 4, 1808. The journal was written in code and had to be translated. Special Collections at the University of Delaware Library in Newark, Delaware has archival holdings on this work.

 

Cyrus Hall McCormick: His Life and Work

by Herbert N. Casson

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What would become the International Harvester Company, originally was known as the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company. The McCormicks were one of many who had developed farm machinery, but their company grew due to Cyrus McCormick’s attention to building marketing, sales and improved manufacturing. However, one aspect of McCormick Harvesting Machine Company growth that has rarely been acknowledged is the slave labor that built such dynasties in the United States. For McCormick, it was Jo Anderson, an enslaved man, whose genius and hard work helped build the mechanical reaper that would make the McCormicks very wealthy. Cyrus’ father, Robert, enslaved Anderson. Together they worked on developing a mechanical alternative to improve farming. Cyrus McCormick wrote of Anderson in his work, The Century of the Reaper:
“Jo Anderson was there, the Negro slave who, through the crowded hours of recent weeks, had helped build the reaper…Anderson deserves honor as the man who worked beside him in the building of the reaper. Jo Anderson was a slave, a general farm laborer and a friend.”

Anderson died sometime in 1888, and did not live to see the success of the machinery he toiled so hard on. Rather, even after the Civil War concluded, Anderson was not able to freely live in Virginia, and remained on the farm where his labor was hired out and he received only a portion of his earnings.

 

Pacific Hurtgen: The American Army in Northern Luzon, 1945

by Robert M. Young

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Too often in war many of its campaigns are forgotten. One such forgotten campaign occurred in the Philippines during the last year of World War II. American Army units fought a bitter battle against dug-in, fanatical Japanese soldiers on the Philippine island of Luzon. It was a campaign that need not have happened. American forces throughout the Pacific were on Japan’s doorstep but due to the immense power and personal desires of a singular commander, General Douglas MacArthur, the Philippines would once again become a major theater of the war. It did not bring the defeat of Japan any closer but did leave many thousands of American soldiers dead and tens of thousands wounded. In Europe, the American Army’s most wasteful campaign occurred in the Hurtgen Forest in 1944. Luzon would be the Pacific Hurtgen.

About the Author 
Dr. Robert Young received a B.A. from St. John’s University, an M.A. from Brooklyn College, and a Ph.D in Military History from the C.U.N.Y. Graduate Center. He is currently an Associate Professor at American Military University as well as a New York City High School History teacher. He is the author of numerous articles on World War II and post-Cold War conflicts. A New York City native and United States Army veteran, he currently lives in Long Island with his wife and two children.

 

 

One Little Orchid: Mata Hari: A Marginal Voice

by Sanusri Bhattacharya

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“Her father was a subject of the Netherlands, and her mother was a Japanese. He died when she was an infant, and in order to protect her from the dangers which beset a young girl of mixed blood in the East, her mother fled from Java with her when she was three years old, and entered Burma. There, to further protect her, she pledged her to celibacy, and placed her in a Buddhist temple to learn dancing. After a dance at a great Buddhist festival in Burma, when she was almost fourteen years old, she saw a British officer and fell in love with him. It was her first love affair. She managed to escape from the temple and joined him … Finally they married. Two children, a boy and a girl, were born of their union … It is certain that she did not love her husband … The climax came when a maid whom she had beaten and discharged caused one of her gardeners to poison her infant son … She took a revolver, and, walking into the garden where the man was working, shot him dead.”
[“Dutch Dancer Spy.” The Southland Times. New Zealand. November 14, 1917.]

“Parisians have become very suspicious of late, but the surprise was general, nevertheless, when they discovered that their exotic favorite, Mata Hari, the Hindoo dancer, was a German spy. At the age of 17 she married a German who had obtained Dutch nationality in order to mask his spying work. The marriage was rather in the nature of a formal business transaction, but this did not prevent the ex-German officer from brutally ill-treating his young wife, whom he wounded on one occasion by a pistol shot. Nevertheless, she entered into the spy system with zest, became duly registered and paid, amused and delighted Paris for some years with her audacious performances, became acquainted with various highly-paid officials and politicians and found means, it is said, to make known to the Germans some of the most important French plans in the first months of the war, and subsequently informed them accurately of the departure of transports.”
[“Combing Out Hun Spies in France.” The Times. London. February 21, 1918.]

These are examples of wartime propaganda against Mata Hari that had been making the rounds in contemporary print media, which continued even after her execution. Most of these conspicuous falsities had been carefully promulgated by France in order to use her as a scapegoat during the wartime crises. In this book the author has tackled the challenge to expose the malicious intentions of the French government and also to show how Mata Hari had fallen prey to the then misogynic European society.

 

 

A History of Shorthand, Written in Shorthand

by Isaac Pitman

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Isaac Pitman (1813-1897) lived a fascinating and varied life. He was born in England, and earned his teaching credential from the British and Foreign School Society. He began teaching in Lincolnshire. After marrying in 1835, he started his own school in Gloucestershire, where he taught for a few years before moving to Bath and starting another school there in 1839. More so than teaching perhaps, Pitman was interested in language, transmission and the printed word. He stopped teaching in 1843 in order to run his printing and binding business. As part of his business’ outputs, he published his own works which forwarded the argument for standardized spelling, including Phonotypy in 1844. Previous to this, he published Sound-Hand, a book on a system of phonetically based shorthand. He began a distance learning course, arguably the first of its kind, where he would work with students on their shorthand through the mail, sending work and critiques to each student. His work was very well received; so much so that by 1886, a million copies of his work, The Phonographic Teacher, were sold. Pitman credited his ability to carry on so many pursuits to his adoption of a vegetarian diet and abstinence from alcohol. He was also devoutly a follower of Swedenborgianism. For all his activity, in 1894, he was knighted by Queen Victoria.

History of Shorthand is written in shorthand, but the back of the book offers a basic look at the language, and transcribing the book provides and opportunity to learn the writing method.

 

Story of the Huguenots: A Sixteenth Century Narrative Wherein the French, Spaniards and Indians Were the Actors

by F. A. Mann

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The Huguenots are French Protestants, a product of turmoil during the early sixteenth century. The Huguenot community oscillated between celebration and persecution in France. On August 24, 1572, while celebrating Saint Bartholomew’s Day, thousands of Huguenots were massacred. After decades of fighting occurred, an edict of peace was issued, which largely remained in place until October 18, 1685 when Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes. Many Huguenots fled France,  then, or before, to escape persecution. Some came to the United States, with the majority deciding to reside in Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and South Carolina. Others settled in England, Sweden, Denmark, and Switzerland. This work offers an interesting account of the Huguenots in Florida and their interactions with the local populace.

This edition is dedicated to Sam Hier, who knows about communities in strife.

 

 

The Story of Garfield: Farm-Boy, Soldier, and President

by William G. Rutherford

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James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States. His term was cut short when he was assassinated in 1881, the same year he took office. Many biographies highlight the difficult circumstances Garfield overcame to become the President. He was born in Ohio on a farm and grew up helping his widowed mother. He worked many jobs to support his family, and was able to attend Williams College, graduating in 1856. He became a member of the Ohio State Senate, running as a Republican. During the Civil War he served as a major general. He then enjoyed a successful Congressional career in Washington. He rose through the ranks to become the Republican Presidential nominee during the 1880 presidential election. It was close, with Garfield beating his Democratic opponent, Winfield Scott Hancock, with a narrow margin. During his brief term, he worked to end corruption in the Post Office, and pushed civil service reform in many ways, namely the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, which eventually passed through by his successor, President Chester A. Arthur.

Westphalia Press occupies the mansion in Washington of Harry Garfield, longtime president of Williams, and repository of much Garfield memorabilia.

 

 

International or Local Ownership?: Security Sector Development in Post-Independent Kosovo

by Dr. Florian Qehaja

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International or Local Ownership? contributes to the debate on the concept of local ownership in post-conflict settings, and discussions on international relations, peacebuilding, security and development studies. It utilizes extensive data collection, including public opinion surveys conducted throughout the country, in order to introduce the concept of local ownership from a policy level towards academia. Empirical data on the relationship between international community and locals in the process of design, management and control of the security sector in the post-independent Kosovo represents one of the most intriguing examples of extensive international community involvement in a state-building project.

Qehaja explains why an excessive role from the international community, which offers no clear exit strategy, has led to the rejection of externally driven policies by local constituencies, finding no applicability in the context of Kosovo. It also shows how international involvement has led to a detachment of security policy from local reality, causing fragmentation and limited sustainability.

Florian Qehaja is currently the Director of Kosovar Centre for Security Studies (KCSS), one of the most prominent think tanks in the Western Balkans. He has over twelve years of experience in cooperating with leading international governmental and non-governmental organisations in Kosovo and the Western Balkans. Mr. Qehaja is author of several scientific and policy publications in the security field, and the recipient of prestigious Fulbright and OSI/Chevening scholarships.

 

 

Ukraine vs. Russia: Revolution, Democracy and War: Selected Articles and Blogs, 2010-2016

by Alexander J. Motyl

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Ukraine vs. Russia offers indispensable background knowledge and analysis on one of the most important issues of the day—Vladimir Putin’s war against democratic Ukraine. Alexander J. Motyl’s articles and blogs offer in-depth analysis as well as a running commentary on current events and historical controversies in both Russia and Ukraine—from the rise of Ukrainian dictator Viktor Yanukovych to the impending fall of Russian dictator Putin. Motyl discusses politics, society, culture, economics, history, language, and memory and shows how they relate to the Russo-Ukrainian War and to Western understanding—and misunderstanding—of Ukraine and Russia.

As Washington considers a policy shift toward Russia and Ukraine, Western policy¬makers and analysts would be well-advised to consult this important volume.

Alexander J. Motyl is professor of political science at Rutgers University-Newark. A specialist on Ukraine, Russia, and the USSR, and on nationalism, revolutions, empires, and theory, he is the author of Imperial Ends: The Decay, Collapse, and Revival of Empires; Revolutions, Nations, Empires: Conceptual Limits and Theoretical Possibilities; Dilemmas of Independence: Ukraine after Totalitarianism; Sovietology, Rationality, Nationality: Coming to Grips with Nationalism in the USSR; Will the Non Russians Rebel? State, Ethnicity, and Stability in the USSR; The Turn to the Right: The Ideological Origins and Development of Ukrainian Nationalism, 1919 1929, the editor of The Encyclopedia of Nationalism, and the co-editor of The Holodomor Reader: A Sourcebook on the Famine of 1932-1933 in Ukraine and The Great West Ukrainian Prison Massacre of 1941: A Sourcebook.

 

From the Farm to the Presidential Chair: The Life and Public Services of James A. Garfield

by James D. McCabe

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James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States. His term was cut short when he was assassinated in 1881, the same year he took office. Many biographies highlight the difficult circumstances Garfield overcame to become the President. He was born in Ohio on a farm and grew up helping his widowed mother. He worked many jobs to support his family, and was able to attend Williams College, graduating in 1856. He became a member of the Ohio State Senate, running as a Republican. During the Civil War he served as a major general. He then enjoyed a successful Congressional career in Washington. He rose through the ranks to become the Republican Presidential nominee during the 1880 presidential election. It was close, with Garfield beating his Democratic opponent, Winfield Scott Hancock, with a narrow margin. During his brief term, he worked to end corruption in the Post Office, and pushed civil service reform in many ways, namely the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, which eventually passed through by his successor, President Chester A. Arthur.

Westphalia Press occupies the mansion in Washington of Harry Garfield, longtime president of Williams, and repository of much Garfield memorabilia.

 

 

The Idea of Neoliberalism: The Emperor Has Threadbare Contemporary Clothes

byJohn Dixon

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Neoliberalism, as a set of ideas, represents the 1970s rebirth—rebranding—of classical liberalism, which originated in the mid-eighteenth century Scottish Enlightenment. This book is about those ideas. It assembles an archetypal ideational construct of neoliberalism, so permitting the demarcation of its worldview, grounded in a set of framing assumptions (organizing ideas) and associated blind spots (reality obfuscations), which enables social reality to be consistently—but incompletely—described, explained, and understood as Neoliberalism presume it to be. This is the methodological tool used to mark out and analyse the incompleteness of the dogma—the Holy Grail—of neoliberalism. The conclusion drawn is that, metaphorically, the emperor’s clothes—all made made in a bygone era—are threadbare for the twenty-first century.

Professor John Dixon B Econ, M Econ, PhD (Public Management and Administration) is Professor of Public Administration in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. He is Emeritus Professor of Public Policy and Management at the University of Plymouth in the United Kingdom. He was elected a fellow of the British Academy of the Social Sciences in 2004, and has been an honorary life member of the American Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars since 2006, nominated by the Public Policy Organization and the American Political Science Association.

 

Pioneer Days in the Wyoming Valley

by Mary Hinchcliffe Joyce

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This is a primary source for the history of Pennsylvania’s Wyoming Valley by someone deeply rooted in its society. Mary Hinchcliffe Joyce (1882-1938) was born in Sabastopol, Jenkins Township in Pennsylvania, and graduated from St. John’s High School. She did not attend college, but worked as a pioneerstenographer and bookkeeper at the Howell and King Brewery. A successful marriage made her a mainstay of life in the region, with service in myriad local groups—the Pittston Hospital Auxiliary, the Mothers’ Assistance Board of Luzerne County and the Luzerne County Historical Society. She was married to state senator, Patrick F. Joyce. In addition to being a politician, he and other associates owned Howell and King, making it into a soda pop and desserts business during Prohibition. His business success enabled him to maintain a large racing stable.

This edition is dedicated to Isaiah Akin, who has demonstrated a keen appreciated for the materials by which history is constructed.

 

James A. Garfield: The Backwoods Boy Who Became President

by Frank Mundell

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James A. Garfield (1831-1881) was the 20th President of the United States. His term was cut short when he was assassinated in 1881, the same year he took office. Many biographies highlight the difficult circbackwoodsumstances Garfield overcame to become the President. He was born in Ohio on a farm and grew up helping his widowed mother. He worked many jobs to support his family, and was able to attend Williams College, graduating in 1856. He became a member of the Ohio State Senate, running as a Republican. During the Civil War he served as a major general. He then enjoyed a successful Congressional career in Washington. He rose through the ranks to become the Republican Presidential nominee during the 1880 presidential election. It was close, with Garfield beating his Democratic opponent, Winfield Scott Hancock, with a narrow margin. During his brief term, he worked to end corruption in the Post Office, and pushed civil service reform in many ways, namely the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, which eventually passed through by his successor, President Chester A. Arthur. 


Westphalia Press occupies the mansion in Washington of Harry Garfield, longtime president of Williams, and repository of much Garfield memorabilia.

 

Thames-Side in the Past: Sketches of its Literature & Society

by F. C. Hodgson

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thamesDescribed as liquid history, the River Thames flows through southern England, salient to such wonderful urban scapes as London, Oxford and Windsor. F.C. Hodgson wrote a great deal about the history of Thames, frequently using it as a lens to discuss various aspects of British history and the river’s impact on the development of England. He has examined the royal connection to the river’s administration, its usage by shipping, the influence it has had on of architectures, and, particularly in this book, on literary and artistic pursuits in relation to the river, along with a look at English society on its banks.

This edition is dedicated to Caroline McCarley, recalling a jolly evening at Oxford.

 

Mexico y sus luchas internas: resena sintetica de los movimientos revolucionarios de 1910 a 1920

by Luis F. Seoane

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La decada de 1910 a 1920 es un periodo de increible agitacion politica conocido como la Revolucion Mexicana. En 1911, Porfirio Diaz, quien habia sido Presidente de Mexico por 35 anos, fue quitado finalmente del poder. Diaz habia ganado las elecciones presidenciales de 1910, pero el Plan de San Luis, redactado originalmente en San Antonio, Texas, por un grupo de exiliados Mexicanos liderados por Francisco I. Madero, arranco el movimiento revolucionario al proponer sacar a Diaz de la presidencia y restaurar la democracia ante un regimen cuyo autoritarismo era ya demasiado.
mexico
Los conflictos armados que surgieron a partir de esto eventualmente forzaron a Diaz a ceder, poniendo a Madero como Presidente hasta su asesinato el 19 de Febrero de 1913. El movimiento revolucionario se convirtio entonces en una serie de batallas sangrientas que poco tenian ya que ver con los objetivos originales del Plan de San Luis y se parecian mas a una fragmentada guerra civil. Luis F. Seoane ofrece un analisis de este momento pivotal de la historia Mexicana y de los diferentes grupos y puntos de vista que lo conformaron.

 

 

Abbeys, Castles and Ancient Halls of England and Wales

by John Timbs and Alexander Gunn

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Here are remarkable stories of abbeys, castles, manors and other notable buildings across England and Wales. The John Timbs account is broken up by region, including Yorkshire, the Isle of Man, and North and South Wales. Timbs manages to cover a lot of ground by providing a brief overview of each point of interest, sketching out its location and offering a compelling historical capsule. He is a master of succinctness.

John Timbs (1801-1875) was a prolific author and noted antiquary. He was born in London, privately educated, and by age sixteen was and apprenticed in both the printing and pharmaceutical trades. He quickly chose to be a writer, providing articles for The Monthly Magazine, later becoming the editor for the Mirror of Literature, The Literary World, and The Harlequin. He was also deeply involved in the Society of Antiquaries of London, and wrote 150 works, including Curiosities of Science (1859); Mysteries of Life, Death, and Futurity (1868) and Doctors and Patients (1873/4). He is perhaps most famously known for editing the Memoirs of the Rev. John Livingston.

This new edition is dedicated to Christopher Hodapp, a 21st century antiquarian of great aplomb.

 

Grandmother Brown’s One Hundred Years, 1827-1927: Settling the Midwest

by Harriet Connor Brown

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Harriet Connor Brown (1877-1859) was born in Burlington, Iowa, and attended Cornell University. She was the first female staff member of Cornell’s newspaper, Erg. After graduation, she worked for other newspapers, including the New York Journal, Buffalo Enquirer and the New York Tribune. She wrote on a wide variety of subjects—political conventions, press bulletins for the US Geological Survey, reports for the Bureau of Labor, and sometimes on federal government studies with her husband, Herbert D. Brown. She was awarded the outstanding biography prize of the Atlantic Monthly for Grandmother’s Brown’s Hundred Years, 1827-1927. Her papers, including the notes for this work, are held at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum in West Branch, Iowa.

This new edition is dedicated to Cecile Revauger, scholar, writer, and advocate of gender equality.

 

Adventures of Hunters and Travellers and Narratives of Border Warfare

by An Old Hunter

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adventuresAdventures of Hunters and Travellers is not a personal account by “An Old Hunter” but rather a collection of brief accounts of various Westerners exploring other parts of the world. For example, there are short accounts about the experiences of James Bruce ‘discovering’ the Nile, and the colonization of New South Wales. Encountering dangerous animals, capture and escape from Native American tribes – exploits and escapades that give a unique look at the long history of colonialism around the world and are accompanied by fascinating illustrations.

 

History of Lady Jane Grey: The Nine Day Queen

by Arthur MacArthur

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The history of Lady Jane Grey illustrates the complex and bloody history of the English monarchy. Through a very long, strange chain of wills, deaths and requests, Jane was named heiress to the English throne of July 1553. She was known as a kind and devout Protestant and was chosen to receive the honor over Edward Tudor’s sister, Mary who was Catholic. The attempt to put Jane in power failed; after nine days she was imprisoned in the Tower of London and then executed. Mary Tudor had gotten enough popular support to have Jane deposed.

Jane’s own immediate family did not impart much kindness either. In a 1550 letter to Roger Ascham, Jane wrote,
“I will tell you a truth which perchance ye will marvel at. One of the greatest benefits that God ever gave me is that he sent me so sharp and severe parents and so gentle a schoolmaster. For when I am in the presence of Father or Mother, whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand or go, eat, drink, be merry or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing, or doing anything else, I must do it as it were in such weight, measure and number, even so perfectly as God made the world; or else I am so sharply taunted, so cruelly threatened, yea presently sometimes with pinches, nips and bobs and other ways (which I will not name for the honour I bear them), so without measure misordered, that I think myself in hell, till time comes that I must go to Mr Aylmer, who teacheth me so gently, so pleasantly, with such fair allurements to learning, that I think all the time nothing while I am with him.”

This new edition is dedicated to Emma Norman, who knows well and cherishes English history.

A Century of Unitarianism in the National Capital, 1821-1921: The Shadow of Slavery

by Jennie W. Scudder

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Jennie Scudder’s work traces the sometimes controversial history of Unitarianism in the District of Columbia, centering on All Souls Unitarian Church. Scudder publshed the volume initially in 1909, but it wasn’t copyrighted until 1921, when the Church celebrated its hundredth birthday. The account includes the development of liberal religion not only in the District but in surrounding towns in northern Virginia centuryand Southern Maryland. There is a great amount of detail on the striking building on 16th Street in Washington, which echoes St. Martins in the Fields in London, the involvement of President Taft and other Washington Unitarians responsible in so small a way for the present look of the city, including luminaries such as Benjamin French and Ulysses Pierce, along with other important capital figures. Its use of original sources makes this a handy volume for anyone looking for more information on Unitarianism or the development of the East Coast.

This new edition is dedicated to Mark Ryan and Ginger Clarkson, good Unitarians, good friends.

 

Benjamin Franklin as a Man of Letters

by John Bach McMaster

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Benjamin Franklin (1705-1790) is often given the title, “The First American” for his tireless advocacy for the colonies to form a union. He was, aside from being an inventor, politician, printer, inventor, diplomat, and scientist, a prolific author. While his published works are well known, his letters are a great source of inspiration as well, full of pithy wisdom. This volume offers a small glimpse of his prolific correspondence, highlighting his time as a diplomat to France, the development of the Farmers’ Almanac, and the steps he often engineered leading to the creation of the United States. They allow readers to glimpse some of Franklin’s humor, rapier wit and penetrating intellect. Far from a dry character, Franklin had a curiosity which fueled an interest in everything, and in this volume reveals himself as a true lover of all aspects of life.

This edition is dedicated to Leo Ribuffo of George Washington University, professor and researcher, mentor and friend.

Rear-Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont: A Biography

by H. A. Du Pont

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Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont (1803-1865) served in the United States Navy, specifically during the Mexican-American War and the Civil War. His uncle, Eleuthere Irenee du Pont, was the founder of what is commonly known as the DuPont chemical concern, but is officially E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. Du Pont’s family was unable to financially support his education, so Samuel enlisted in the Navy. His family’s connections obtained appointment to midshipman by President James Madison. He had an illustrious career until questions about his judgment in an attempt to capture Charleston during the Civil War became an issue when the blockade failed. Du Pont was so anguished by this that he relieved himself of command on July 5, 1863. Later events proved that he was not at fault, and nearly two decades after his death in 1865, a bronze sculpture of Du Pont and the renaming of the region in Washington DC from Pacific Circle to Du Pont Circle was dedicated on December 20, 1884. The statue was moved by the Du Pont family in 1920 to Wilmington, Delaware. It was replaced in 1921 by a memorial fountain that still stands today, one that was sculpted by Daniel Chester French and designed by Henry Bacon. Dupont Circle has remained a popular attraction for locals and tourists alike in DC. The location has slowly changed its name from Du Pont to Dupont, so this work illustrating the deeds for which the area received its namesake is especially important. This edition is dedicated to the good people of the Dupont Circle Citizens Association, guardians of what is a national treasure.

Frontier Law: A Story of Vigilante Days

by William J. Connell

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Gold and blood, Indians and pioneers, criminals and vigilantes! These are terms that have captivated the imagination of America for generations. Nevertheless, authentic, first-hand accounts of the vigilantes have been few indeed. The reason is plain: no one who helped to dispense the rough and salutary justice of the frontier thought it discreet to tell what they knew. But after the passing of the years, when time healed many wounds, William J. McConnell, once Governor of Idaho and also United States Senator, came forth with a story that makes the blood leap. In matter-of-fact fashion, and as vividly as if he were relating events of the day before yesterday, he tells of the overland journey to the Coast, of placer mining in California shortly after the wild days of ‘49, of homesteading in Oregon, and of farming and prospecting in Idaho. Most unusual and interesting of all, he relates the inside story of the secret Vigilantes, who restored control of territorial affairs for the people of Idaho when criminals and their satellites in office had made a mockery of the processes of justice and government.   This edition is dedicated to John Cooper, bibliophile and ever curious scholar-enthusiast for American history and the story of Westward Movement.

Recollections of the Early Days of American Accountancy, 1883-1893

by James T. Anyon

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accountAccountants are often hidden from view and little considered as part of history, though their impact on our lives is tremendous. Business history sadly tends to neglect the field, so small gems such as Recollections of the Early Days of American Accountancy, 1883-1893 are often lost to scholars. In this informative work by James T. Anyon, the story of the formation of the first public accounting firm in 1883 through the development of the American Association of Public Accountants offers an unusual glimpse of how this profession came to know itself, become standardized and developed a community of practitioners. This edition is dedicated to Rex Kallembach CPA, longtime Treasurer of the Policy Studies Association and a generous and good friend of academia.

Captain John Smith and His Critics

by Charles Poindexter

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Though he lived over 500 years ago, Captain John Smith’s life is still much discussed. He was born in 1580 in England, and at sixteen, after his father’s death, Smith set off for a life at sea. He fought under various flags and found himself knighted by the Prince of Transylvania, but later captured and sold as a slave. He would escape and return to England by 1604. Two years later he was on an expedition set to colonize the New World under the Virginia Company of London. The journey took over four months before they first landed in Virginia. In that time, Smith was charged with mutiny and nearly executed. They would later settle in Jamestown, which was disastrous because of the swampy region, disease, insufficient food, and generous malnutrition. Smith spent a great deal of time navigating for food what is now known as the Chesapeake Bay area, and developed detailed maps as a result. It 1609 as a result of a injury he returned to England for medical treatment. In 1614 he sailed for the United States again, but to what is now known as New England, creating a map of the region that replaced the Native American place names with those suggested by Charles I. In 1615, on a second attempt to return, he was briefly captured by French pirates, escaped and then remained in England until his passing in 1631. His life continues to be a source of great scholarly controversy, particularly around his relationship to Pocahontas. This seminal lecture by Charles Poindexter illustrates some of these points of contention.

Old Chinatown: Turn of the Century Photographs of San Francisco’s Chinatown

by Arnold Genthe and Will Irwin

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This volume is one of a number of Westphalia titles significant in the story of the not always happy and often controversial Chinese contact with Western society. In the American case, despite appreciation by scholars for Chinese civilization, cries against Chinese immigration began in response to the development of the transcontinental railroad that saw the arrival of immigrants exploited as cheap labor. The first restrictive Act passed on May 6, 1882, and was the start of a series of increasingly more restrictive laws against Chinese, such as the Act to Prohibit the Coming of Chinese Persons into the United States, known more popularly as the Geary Act of May 1892. It wasn’t until the Immigration Act of October 1965 when the exclusionary practices were lifted, despite President Truman’s signing of the Act to Repeal the Chinese Exclusion Acts, to Establish Quotas and for Other Purposes in December of 1943.

The Speculative Art of Alchemy: A Text Book on the Art of Self-Regeneration

by A. S. Raleigh

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Of The Speculative Art of Alchemy, Raleigh wrote, “This Course of Lessons constitutes the Official Text Book of the Hermetic Brotherhood of Atlantis for the study of the Speculative Art of Alchemy, they contain as much of the Sacred Art as will ever be given to the general public at any time…In this training there are three stages of Discipleship. Let it be borne in mind that the Hermetic Discipleship is in reality a course of training. Never make the mistake of assuming that it is merely a theory that you have undertaken to study.”alchemy2

Dr. A. S. Raleigh wrote numerous books on this and similar fields, as he was interested in exploring and encouraging others to study the interconnectedness of spirit, geometry, science, nature and religion. His significant works including Scientifica Hermetica: An Introduction to the Science of Alchemy, Hermetic Fundamentals Revealed, Occult Geometry and Philosophia Hermetica.

This edition is dedicated to John Belton, learned scholar-student of the bypaths and byways of  the arcane past.

Alchemy: Ancient and Modern: Meaning, Theory and Lies of Alchemists Across the Ages

by H. Stanley Redgrove

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According to the author, alchemy was the belief that “all the metals (and, indeed, all forms of matter) are one in origin, and are produced by an evolutionary process. The Soul of them all is one and the same; it is only the Soul that is permanent…” Redgrove offers a detailed account of alchemy’s controversial history, treating both the theoretical and physical approaches to the field. Alcalchemy1hemy: Ancient and Modern has long been viewed as a significant introductory text to the subject.

Herbert Stanley Redgrove (1887-1943) wrote several texts on similar topics, including A Mathematical Theory of Spirit, Bygone Beliefs and Purpose and Transcendentalism. He was a chemist and a founder of the Alchemical Society in London.


This edition is dedicated to Adam Kendall, in his distinctive way an authority on the mysteries of the past.

My Garden of Memory: An Autobiography of an Advocate for Early Child Education

by Kate Douglas Wiggin

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Kate Douglas Wiggin (1856-1923) was a pioneer, leading the way to massive reform of children’s education in the United States, along with her sister, Nora Archibald Smith. During the late 1800s, most people had minimal education, as children went to work at very young ages. To help combat this issue, Wiggin began the Silver Street Free Kindergarten in San Francisco. Wiggin herself had had a variety of educational experiences, including home schooling, short terms at Gorham Female Seminary, Morison Academy and Abbot Academy where she graduated in 1873. 
garden
Wiggin started the Silver Street Free Kindergarten, and then developed a school for educational training in conjunction with it. To help raise money for the schools, she wrote several popular
books, The Story of Patsy, The Birds’ Christmas Carol and Rebecca of Sunnybrook, among others. She also wrote books on teaching, such as Kindergarten Principles and Practice. My Garden of Memory was published posthumously and offers a detailed look at her interesting and meaningful life.

This edition is dedicated to Dr. Karan Powell, Provost of the American Public University System and in her own way a pioneer in extending the boundaries of learning.