A Series of Discourses Upon Architecture in England

by Rev. James Dallaway

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Rev. James Dallaway had published the successful survey Observations on English Architecture. Yet, the passing of twenty years had brought more insight, clarity, and of course further changes to the physical layout of buildings across the United Kingdom. Rather than revising the original work,
he created this volume, a collection of discourses, which included a variety of thoughts from other scholars on critical issues that had arisen. His work includes a lot of opinions of controversies about development of architecture, including his belief that Grecian architecture deeply influenced the Gothic style. He writes of the Tudor style, military architecture, and Free Masons, among other topics. Some critics have argued that his preference for certain architectural styles, such as Scottish Gothic, gives his work a biased tone when it comes to declaring some styles as superior to others. Regardless of preference, this work still despite the passage of time gives a lot of food for discussion.

 

The Old Clock Book: A History of Dials, Clocks, Watches and More

by N. Hudson Moore

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N. Hudson Moore (1857-1927) was the penname of Hannah Woodbridge Hudson, who, in person went by the nickname Nannie. In London, her books were published under the name Mrs. Hannah Woodbridge Hudson Moore. She was a passionate antiquarian and knowledgeable about furniture and design, and wrote numerous volumes about her enthusiasms, including The Lace Book (1905), The Old Furniture Book (1903), The Collector’s Manual (1906), and Delftware, Dutch and English (1908). She also wrote children’s stories and stories about flowers, including Flower Fables and Fancies (1904). She died in Boston on October 1, 1927.

 

In the Great God’s Hair: Translated from the Original Manuscript

by F. W. Bain

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F.W. Bain translated this work from the original Sanskrit, and offered this as an introduction, “The name of the little Indian gable, here presented to the lover of curiosities in an English dress, is ambiguous. We may translate it indifferently, either: The New Moon in the hair of the God of Gods, or else, She That Reduces the Pride of Gods, Demons, and all the Rest of Creation, that is the Goddess of Beauty and Fortune. To those unfamiliar with the peculiar genius of the Sanskrit language, it might seem singular, that two such different ideas should be expressible by the one and the same word. but it is just in this power of dexterous ambiguity that the beauty of that language lies.”

Francis William Bain was born on April 29, 1863 and lived until March 3, 1940. He enjoyed a wide variety of pursuits in his life, ranging from being an amateur footballer to serving as a professor of history in British India. Yet he considered himself primarily a writer, specializing in fantasy, which he claimed to have translated from Sanskrit. However, these works were not directly taken from Hindu manuscripts, but were rather a mixture of Orientalism and Bain’s interest in fantasy. Although it was revealed that Bain was lying about the origins of such works as In the Great God’s Hair, his readership was unaffected. However, it is important for readers of to know that the views that this work imparts on marriage, love, and religion, are largely those of Bain’s and not a true reflection of Hinduism.

 

Dave Darrin and the German Submarines

by H. Irving Hancock

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Harrie Irving Hancock was born on January 16, 1868 in Massachusetts, passing away on March 12, 1922. Although he was a chemist, he is recognized more for his writing. He was a journalist for several years, working for the Boston Globe, and served as a war correspondent during the Spanish-American War. He specialized in juvenile writing, although he also wrote a bit about sports, and even a series of books about physical fitness. Typically, his stories featured adventures with male hero figures, sometimes set in the past, or often in military combat. He typically wrote under his name, though occasionally used a pseudonym. He is credited with writing dozens of books, along with numerous articles for newspapers and magazines.

Hancock was enamored with Japanese fighting styles, such as Jiu-Jitsu, and not only wrote about it, he practiced the sport. Unfortunately, he was also guilty of using racial stereotypes in his works, particularly against Germans and Chinese characters, as the subtitle of his work illustrates.

 

The Quintessence Of Nietzsche

by J. M. Kennedy

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Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) has had a profound impact on our way of life. Among other things, he was a philosopher, a poet, and a scholar. Unfortunately, he suffered from poor health, which caused him to resign from his position as the Chair of Classical Philology, which he held at the age of 24. At 44, he was so ill that his mother, and then his sister had to care for him until his death at the page of 55. Nietzsche wrote on numerous subjects, but is commonly associated with nihilism, critiques of Christian morality, and his strong opposition to anti-Semitism and nationalism. There was a brief time when his sister reworked his manuscripts to favor Nazi ideology, but the correct manuscripts were uncovered. Many scholars have written about Nietzsche.

J. M. Kennedy was the pen name for John McFarland, who wrote extensively on Nietzsche. He also wrote on education, philology and war.

This new edition is dedicated to Daniel Gutierrez Sandoval and Emma Norman, who have had different views of Nietzsche.

Please note that this is a reprint of the original version, and has a few small blemishes.

 

Beasts, Men and Gods: Russia, Mongolia, Tibet and the Living Buddha

by Ferdynand Antoni Ossendowski

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If the tales by Ferdinand Ossendowski are true, then he led an extraordinary life. Ossendowski begins his account in a solitary shack in Siberia. Having heard that the police are coming for him, he sneaks off in the bitter cold, armed with an axe, guns, and many shells. Not surprisingly, after reading the initial portion of Ossendowksi’s draft, the publisher sought out a confirmed account. He was assigned a translator and critical editor to get him to offer full details. In addition to his life as an adventurer, Ossendowski considered himself a scientist as he traveled extensively throughout Asia. Given that he was was billed as a “twentieth century Robinson Crusoe” possibly the reader will be well advised that the book should be taken with a grain of salt. The account abounds with both wild adventure and ethnocentrism.

 

Modern Methods in Horology

by Grant Hood

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This book offers a history of horology to the turn of the 20th century, with chapters on watchmaking and repair. Perhaps author Grant Hood can put the aims of the book in the best perspective:

“Knowing the difficulties that present themselves to the average watchmaker as he begins serving his apprenticeship and knowing how limited the supply of knowledge he is able to find and understand I have been prompted to write these pages, hoping the information may be such that it will encourage those that are discouraged, add renewed vigor to those who are ambitious and act as a warning to the ones that are inclined to be careless with their work. My aim will be to make each subject as simple and clear as possible, adding illustrations in all cases where they are needed. If the book is successful in helping my brother workmen and shall bring to them some new ideas that shall be beneficial or shall be the means of enabling them to do their work in an easier manner, the writer will feel that his labor has not been in vain and will be well pleased.”

This new edition is dedicated to San Tun Oo, enthusiastic collector of watches.