Storia del Grande Oriente d’Italia (Italian Edition)

by Emanuela Locci

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Questo volume è la traduzione italiana di un libro precedente nato con l’intento di colmare una lacuna bibliografica, infatti, fino alla sua pubblicazione non era presente nella letteratura massonica un libro che trattasse in maniera organica la storia della massoneria in Italia, scritto in inglese. Questo volume si proponeva di eliminare questa mancanza e di far conoscere a una parte del mondo, quella che si rifà alla lingua anglosassone, la storia della più importante delle Obbedienze che operano in Italia: il Grande Oriente d’Italia.

Il libro nasce dall’unione delle competenze di giovani ricercatori italiani che si occupano di massoneria e si sono incontrati in occasione del primo seminario promosso dal Centro Ricerche Storiche sulla Libera Muratoria che si è tenuto a Torino nel 2017 e che hanno deciso di mettere il loro sapere e la loro professionalità al servizio della storia e di questo libro.

 

cover image with white text of the book information over an image of the interior of a church

Beat the Drum Ecclesiastic: Gilbert Sheldon and the Settlement of Anglican Orthodoxy

by Heather D. Thornton

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Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury (1663-77) was at the helm during the time the Church of England sought to remake and redefine itself in the aftermath of not only the Civil Wars, Interregnum, but the Restoration Settlement as well. He aided in the preservation of a remnant of the Church of England, supported his king until his execution, and gained a high position in the Church upon its return, which gave him the opportunity to influence the Church to the present day.

This work seeks to highlight Sheldon’s role during this era, and illustrates his powerful influence upon the Church he tirelessly served. Sheldon has often been one figure often overlooked by history and this work seeks to correct that problem. It showcases the importance of his steady hand at the helm of the church in the 17th century that allowed the Church of England to recover and flourish in later centuries.

Author Blurb
Heather D. Thornton received her PhD from Louisiana State University in 2010. She is currently an associate professor with the Department of History at American Public University. This is her first book.

 

Siren of the Heart

by Gad Ben-Meir

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Siren of the Heart is a selection of Ben-Meir’s poems written over the last twelve years celebrating his avid appreciation and colourful insight into love and friendship in all their manifestations, repercussions and, sometimes, conversion into hate or antipathy. His rhymes and free verse illuminate the breadth and depth of such feelings covering, inter alia, the readers’ underlying stratum of their own life experiences. Ben-Meir has cast, with verve and vivacity, his Middle Eastern cultural background into the vibrant and multi-cultural societies of Australia and England where he and his family have lived for close to six decades.

 

Andy Gordon

by Horatio Alger, introduction by Dr. Wallace Boston

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

The Black Tortoise: Being the Strange Story of Old Frick’s Diamond

by Frederick Viller

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Frederick Viller is the nom de plume of Christian Herman Sparre, a Norwegian Commanding Admiral and a member of Parliament. Sparre was born on July 30, 1859 in Norway to a prominent physician father, who also was a member of Parliament. Sparre was a graduate of both the Norwegian Naval Academy and the Norwegian Military Academy. He went on to a distinguished military career, all while serving as a politician, first serving on the Council of State Division in 1900, later being elected to the Norwegian Parliament in 1913.

Sparre also wrote a variety of fiction as well. The Black Tortoise is a detective novel, followed by The Mysterious Ship. The works were translated from the original into English. This particular work was translated by Mrs. H. L. Braekstad.

This new edition is dedicated to Larissa P. Watkins, scholar and librarian extraordinary, guide to Masonry and mystery.

 

Worlds of Print: The Moral Imagination of an Informed Citizenry, 1734 to 1839

by John Slifko

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Plato, Aristotle, Baron Montesquieu, and Jean Jacques Rousseau argued that you could never have a democracy bigger than the geographic size, intimate oral habits, and embodied rituals of face-to-face communication, and walking distance of a Greek city-state, French town, or small Swiss city. However, in the years surrounding the 1776 American War of Independence and accelerating into the 1800s in the American northeast and mid-Atlantic, there was a significant cultural transformation in the transition from oral/aural cultures to an increasingly literate citizenry. A consequence of this transition was an expanded geographical range of democratic engagement. In this book, John Slifko argues that freemasonry was representative and played an important role in this transformation and helped articulate the moral imagination of an informed democratic citizenry via fast emerging worlds of print.

A metamorphosis occurred through worlds of print anchored at home in the routine lives of local community and transmission in space across networks of place. Communication and political participation were enhanced in early America through a growing range of print vehicles such as pamphlets, newspapers, declarations and books of all types concerned with ancient and modern learning. The formation of local civic associations and reading libraries further contributed to this growth of available print documents. This work examines the vital roles that freemasons played in this print transformation.

About the Author:

John Slifko (1950-2018) was an expert in the fields of Freemasonry and Esotericism. He dedicated much of his scholarly and charitable work to studying democratic civil societies.

In 2015, John was awarded the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Geography from University of California, Los Angeles. He completed a joint Bachelor’s degree in Urban Planning and Geography in 1987 from San Francisco State and a Master’s degree in 1989 from University of California, Los Angeles in Urban Planning. John worked as a Planning Deputy for the Los Angeles City Council and as a Legislative Aide Field Representative for the United States Congress.

He was a founding member and served on the Board of Advisors at the Hannah Mather Crocker Society, Notre Dame University. He was also a Founder and co-Director of the Roosevelt Center for the Study of Civil Society and Freemasonry and Project AWE, which is dedicated to exploring connections between Western esotericism and the arts.

John was described by Zhenya Gershman, an Artist and Art Historian, as someone who “had a thirst for knowledge and a striving for improvement of life conditions for others that continues to be contagious. The concept of ‘Moral Imagination’ represented to John a combination of the reverie for artistic creativity with simultaneous responsibility for the world”.

 

The Hope for Perfect People Leaders: Positive Psychology Education to Lead our Future Health, Happiness and Success

by Dr. Lisa Miller

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The Hope for Perfect People Leaders provides a visionary strategic plan to educate and empower our future generations as luminaries of positive psychology. Leaders learn to dedicate themselves to the hope for higher humanism, while also producing prosperity through local and global altruistic reciprocity.

Readers will find a multidisciplinary collaboration from meticulous researchers, bold leaders, compassionate thinkers, eloquent activists, clever humorists, Olympic coaches, and wise discerning diplomats. This work offers a thought provoking mentality capable of improving one’s fundamental motivation toward life experiences. Lessons learned from the reading will inspire increased emotional intelligence, gracefulness in conflict, dedication to loyally serving others, and cultural inclusivity of demographic diversity and neurodiversity.

Dr. Lisa Miller, Professor of Health Sciences at American Military University, contributed 20 years of expertise on innovative collaborations in research, teaching, and service to develop our hope for altruistic leaders who will improve mental, physical, and spiritual health in higher education. Dr. Miller completed a Doctorate from The Ohio State University with interdisciplinary specializations in Higher Education and Student Affairs, Counseling and Sport Psychology, Research Methods for Human Development, and Sport and Exercise Management. She earned a Master of Human Resources from the Fisher College of Business along with a Graduate Concentration from Harvard University in Education and Religious Studies in addition to a Bachelor of Science in the Psychology Honors Program from Wright State University as a tennis scholar athlete. In her spare time, Dr. Miller enjoys discussing noble international projects, traveling internationally, teaching tennis, strolling through campuses, and helping others with positive psychology skills to proactively improve mental health.

 

The Peerless Cook Book: With Recipes for the Chafing Dish

by Mary J. Lincoln

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Mary Johnson Bailey Lincoln was born on July 8, 1844 in South Attleboro, Massachusetts. At the mere age of seven, her father died. She was able to attend school, graduating in 1864 from the Wheaton Female Seminary, now today known as Wheaton College. She married and became a housewife, but due to her husband’s failing health, she began teaching at the Boston Cooking School in the Spring of 1879. At first she declined the position, not thinking she was qualified, but after some instruction she took on the role and it grew immensely with her. Aside from organizing and teaching a variety of classes, she wrote Mrs. Lincoln’s Boston Cook Book: What to Do and What Not to Do in Cooking. Her cook book was highly detailed and considered scientific for including information on chemistry and food composition. It set the standard for cook books.

The Peerless Cook Book, first published in 1886, was her second published book. She also wrote a textbook for cooking, Boston School Kitchen Textbook: Lessons in Cooking for the Use of Classes in Public and Industrial Schools, which was published the following year. She thoroughly enjoyed teaching and writing, and published several articles in various magazines, she taught at Lasell Seminary, was a member of the New England Woman’s Press Association, served as editor and advisor on various publications and much more, including owning her own company, Mrs. Lincoln’s Baking Powder Company of Boston. Her work can be found under the name, Mrs. D.A. Lincoln, until 1894 when her husband, David A. Lincoln, passed away. Afterwards, she went by Mary J. Lincoln. She passed away on December 2, 1921.

This edition is dedicated to Elizabeth Helm in hopes she finds it handy.

 

Dan, The Newsboy

by Horatio Alger, introduction by Dr. Wallace Boston

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

Russia: A Study

by A. N. Drew

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A. N. Drew spent over twenty-five years doing business in Russia, and picked up the language over time. This work is an attempt at interpreting Russian life, which is the first portion of the book. In it, Drew highlights political issues in chapters such as “Character,” “Morality,” and “Education.” Drew also spends time analyzing issues of religion and nationality in Russia, including anti-Semitic violence and anti-German sentiments.

Due to his interest and specialty, Drew spends the latter portion of the book on issues of Russian industry, both on natural resources, as well as taxation and business development. Published at the end of World War I, it offers an illuminating look at concerns of a rapidly shifting global political landscape.

This new edition is dedicated to the scholars of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, custodians of much of Russian history.

 

The Remains of William Penn: Pennsylvania’s Plea, the Mission to England, Visit to the Grave, Letters, Etc

by George L. Harrison

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William Penn was born in London, England, on October 14, 1644, and would become many things, including a father, husband, legal and religious figure. He is most well known for founding the state of Pennsylvania. Penn was born into a family of wealth and political power, and as such, he enjoyed quality schooling, including attending Christ Church College, now University of Oxford, in 1660. However, he was expelled for criticizing the Church of England. During the 1660s, Penn met some members of the Society of Friends while in Ireland, and he eventually converted to the religion. He was jailed for blasphemy his 1668 work, The Sandy Foundation Shaken. Undeterred, and even more committed to his faith, he wrote No Cross, No Crown. He married fellow Quaker, Gulielma Maria Springett, and together they had three children. In 1681, Penn petitioned King Charles II for a charter to found Pennsylvania, which he hoped to develop as a place tolerant of all religions, and to have peaceful relationships with the numerous Native American tribes inhabiting the area.

Penn lived in and out of Pennsylvania after founding it, but returned to England after 1701, and ultimately passed away in Berkshire, England, on July 30, 1718. His health had been failing after he suffered a stroke in 1712. His second wife, Hannah Callowhill, largely ran the colony.

This edition is dedicated to the library readers of the Friends Meeting in Washington, D.C.

 

The Life And Works Of Charles Lamb: The Essays Of Elia

by Charles Lamb

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Charles Lamb (1775 – 1834) was a popular English author of works for both adults and children. His siblings were fairly spread out in age, so his elder sister Mary, 11 years older, became his closest friend. She taught him to read and would later author books with Charles. Lamb was educated throughout his life, enjoying a lifelong friendship with his first schoolmistress, Mrs. Reynolds. He went on to attend such institutions as Christ’s Hospital, a boarding school. Lamb was considered to be very popular and well-liked, however, he had a speech impediment, and it was this stuttering that kept him out of going onto college. Instead, Lamb worked as a clerk in several offices, eventually remaining with the British East India Company.

Lamb also took care of his sister Mary after she killed her mother in a fit of madness. Rather than allow her to remain imprisoned for life, Lamb worked to ensure she had been cared for in an asylum, and then was allowed to return home and live with Lamb. Despite a few attempts to court women to marriage, he was unsuccessful, and remained a lifelong bachelor. He and his sister enjoyed a fruitful social life, participating in many English salons. Lamb enjoyed success as a writer, particularly with his prose works, and his famous, Essays of Elia series, and the children’s work, Tales from Shakespeare that was written with his sister.

This new edition is dedicated to Peter Dozal, with best wishes for his studies.

 

The Soul of a People

by H. Fielding Hall

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The Soul of a People was originally released in 1898. Written by Harold Fielding Hall, a British official sent to Burma (now Myanmar) to take part in the Burma Commission. Hall lived for many years in Burma, and wrote this account of the places, people and of Buddhism as he encountered it during his travels.

Through his understanding on Burmese Buddhism, he uses it to relate to other Burmese customs and laws, on everything from marriage, festivals, criminal justice, gender roles, and the high value placed on life in all forms found within nature. Hall writes as a liberal Christian seeking to learn more about Buddhism, and he endeavors to describe religious tenants, as well as folklore and other local beliefs and customs. This work gives a great glimpse of life in Burma during the late 1800s, while also illustrating the perils of colonialism.

This new edition is dedicated to Hera Tun Oo, energetic traveler and probing scholar.

 

Masonry and Protestantism

by Susanna Hopkins Mason

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.John J. Lanier was a self-described, Masonic Lecturer, and author of numerous books on Masonic culture, including The Master Mason, Masonry and Citizenship, and Washington, the Great American Mason.

 

Selections From the Letters and Manuscripts of the Late Susanna Mason: With a Brief Memoir of Her Life by Her Daughter

by Susanna Hopkins Mason

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Susanna Hopkins Mason grew up in Maryland, with a father who was a member of the Society of Friends and a mother who was a member of the Episcopal church. Mason was fully encouraged by her parents in her educational pursuits throughout her life. Growing up, she made several visits to relatives in Philadelphia who also encouraged her education and literary talents.

Around the age of twenty, Mason became a member of the Religious Society of Friends. In 1779, she married George Mason and moved to Chester County, Pennsylvania. Mason became deeply involved in the Friends religious community. She spent a great deal of time in Philadelphia, and in the countryside to recover from several bouts of ill health. She began a school, and a relief organization for impoverished women in Baltimore. She passed away at the age of 57 in 1805. Her husband, George Mason, was the founding Virginia Governor.

This new edition is dedicated to the members of the Friends Meeting of Washington, D.C.

 

The Art of England: Lectures Given in Oxford

by John Ruskin

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John Ruskin (February 8, 1819 – January 20, 1900) was a brilliant English writer, artist, thinker and philanthropist. He was born into a family of means, which afforded him an excellent education. His parents were very encouraging of him, and Ruskin benefited from frequent travels throughout his lifetime. He began publishing, often poetry and articles on nature, and attended the University of Oxford, where he graduated with rare highest honors, despite bouts of illness.

He began traveling with his parents throughout Italy, France and other parts of Europe, where his writings on art criticism and history were well received. Among other arguments, Ruskin felt that architectural restoration was in fact, a form of destruction, and felt that preservation and conservation were better approaches. In 1848 he married Effie Gray, but the marriage was very unhappy and remained unconsummated until 1854, when it was annulled.

By 1850, in addition to much writing, Ruskin began to give popular public lectures on architecture and on painting in particular. But by the later 1850s, Ruskin began focusing his work on economics, particularly labor and social justice. His political ideas became extremely influential, particularly to Mohandas Gandhi. Later, he was invited to lecture at the University of Oxford. He also founded a utopian society, the Guild of St. George, in 1871. Ruskin wrote a great deal, lectured, and experimented with architecture and community until he died of influenza January 20, 1900 at the age of 80.

This new edition is dedicated to Dr. Ruskin Chádez Ibarra, scholar and researcher.

 

The Brockton Hospital Cook Book

by The Ladies Aid of the Brockton Hospital

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The Ladies Aid of the Brockton Hospital wrote this work in hopes of improving cuisine in the area, as well as raising financial aid for The Brockton Hospital which was a privately managed, public institution. The cook book features a variety of recipes for the average home, including for preparing bread, breakfast, meat, salads, pies and relishes. There is a chapter for recipes intended for those who are ill as well. In addition to providing a variety of easy to prepare omelets, cookies, jellies and more, the cookbook offers an interesting look at life, particularly consumer goods, of the 1910s.

Brockton Hospital was founded in 1896, and is known for featuring a school of nursing. It closed during the Great Depression, but reopened due to World War II. The hospital is now known as Signature Healthcare Brockton Hospital, located in Brockton, Massachusetts.

 

A Whistling Farmer

by H. W. Randolph

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Henry Wheeler Randolph was born in 1851. Not much is known about his life. However, through this book of his poetry, much can be gleamed from him and the circumstances of his life. His poems touch on lost love, farming, criminal justice, the Civil War, religion and the pleasures found in nature, general advice and of US history.As he states in his poem, “At the Front,”:”Through faith it is we see beyondThe pale of human thought,One glimpse, and, lo! a brilliant dawnForth stands before us wrought”This new edition is dedicated to Judith Rich Lauder.

 

Sir David Wilkie

by Lord Ronald Sutherland Gower

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Sir David Wilkie RA was born on November 18, 1785 in Scotland. Although he family was not terribly pleased with his devotion to the arts, they supported his choice to become a painter, and he went on to study at the Trustees’ Academy in Edinburgh. After graduation, he returned home and was commissioned to do many portraits, as his talent was already well recognized. After approximately a year, Wilkie went to study at the Royal Academy in 1805, again finding great success. Wilkie was elected an associate of the Royal Academy in 1809, and by 1811 he became a full Academician.He primarily did portraiture work, often for royalty, which was very stressful for Wilkie and took a toll on his health. He traveled through Europe and the Middle East, which broadened his influence and interests, although he remained primarily commissioned to do portraits.

Interestingly, several subjects were not terribly pleased with the outcome of his work, finding it not particularly flattering, while he served as the Royal Limner for Scotland. While traveling, Wilkie picked up a terrible illness in Malta, and passed away while heading to Britain on June 1, 1841. He was buried at sea near the Bay of Gibraltar.

 

A Common Sense Manifesto (With a Nod to Thomas Paine, Not Karl Marx)

by Max J. Skidmore

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political situation in America, and how it came to be. It chronicles the disturbing deterioration of the Republican Party into an extreme and corrupt mechanism ready to receive and incorporate a destructive force that it welcomed wholeheartedly when it appeared in the bombastic, and completely self-centered, form of Donald Trump. Calling for a “blue tsunami,” the Manifesto outlines the way forward, out of the insanity. It notes political realities and thus accepts the need to work within the two-party system. It argues for a rational and comprehensive “Modern Political Economy” that recognizes environmental imperatives, corrects severe income and political inequality, expands Social Security, implements universal health care, protects the rights and dignity of all the people, improves America’s sagging infrastructure and transportation up to world-class and responsible standards, and ensures full participation in the national bounty in ways that protect the world and all its current and future inhabitants.

 

US Ballistic Missile Defense and Deterrence Postures: The New Cold War Era Perspective on the Wartime Use of Active Missile Defenses

by Grzegorz Nycz

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This book discusses most recent developments in the area of US ballistic missile defense with an eye on its battlefield capacities since the Kuwait war, analyzed from the perspective of deterrence postures encompassing the key post-Cold War security challenges (Middle East, Far East, Eastern Europe). The analyzed cases of missile defense engagements included (after the Desert Storm), Operation Iraqi Freedom, Israeli operations against Hamas and Yemen war. The theoretical base of the book relied on the waves of deterrence theory since the early years of the nuclear age through the deployment of thermonuclear warheads, nuclear plenty and the late Cold War revisions of deterrence paradigms.

The main body of the book is exploring the historical and probabilistic evidence on missile defense accuracy in various scenarios of its employment and differing layered short, medium and long range systems of the US counter-ballistic technologies. Historically, the missile defense investments since the early thermonuclear range were challenging the Mutual Assured Destruction paradigm. Notably, after partial marginalization of US long range missile defense concepts of the 1960s, seen as incompatible with 1972 Anti-ballistic missile treaty between the US and USSR, missile defense constructions were reinvigorated through Reagan’s 1983 Strategic Defense Initiative, while post-1976 Patriot tactical air and missile defense were gradually winning arms contracts, as in the post Cold War age the value of extended deterrence grew. New post-Cold War missile defense investments included the Middle Eastern US allies, as well as Japan and South Korea threatened by DPRK nuclear and ballistic experiments. Importantly, the value of extended missile defense engagements became broader visible in the era of New Cold War between Russia and the West, when new Aegis Ashore bases in Romania and Poland proved the theater range missile defense capacity of new NATO members.

Grzegorz Nycz, Ph.D. is adjunct professor at the Pedagogical University of Cracow’s Institute of Political Science. He graduated from Jagiellonian University and Cracow University of Economics. Ryoichi Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowship Fund Fellow 2007/2008. His research refers to U.S. security and foreign policy, with a special focus on nuclear deterrence and ballistic missile defense postures. His recent publications include monographs on strategic balance and U.S. national security policy and texts in periodicals related to ballistic missile defense investments, as well as U.S. military-political engagements in Eastern Europe, Middle East and East Asia in the time of the “New Cold War” between Russia and the West.

 

The cover is teal and features light colored outlines of a hand and a long braid. The title, All Flowers Bloom, is in black and the author's name is in red below in a strong font.

All Flowers Bloom

by Kawika Guillermo

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Winner of the 2021 Reviewers Choice Gold Award for Best General Fiction/Novel


In a cruise ship stateroom, a soul awakens in the afterlife, still dressed in the Roman servant garbs of his previous life.

He can’t remember much, but a silent woman stands out in his memory: his first and only love.

Unable to cope with an eternity without her, he leaps from the ship and back into the depths of the life stream.

Five hundred years later, he awakens again in the same stateroom, alone and fueled with new memories of her.

In his past lives she was a male insurgent, an elderly wise woman, an unruly servant.

For a millennia the pair are tethered together, clashing in love and fear, betraying each other in times of war and famine.

Before memory drives him mad, he vows to rescue her from the stream — even if it takes a thousand lifetimes more.

Published March 20, 2020


“A defiant and tender call for the power of love, across a thousand lifetimes and lands. Guillermo’s imagination is breath-taking, and he shows the power of the written word as at once the most high-fidelity and stylized of mediums.”
—Ken Liu, author of The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories and The Grace of Kings

“Kawika Guillermo has achieved an ambitious feat: to chronicle a memory—and its vast empire of battles and love, constant guises and surprises—that spans over four thousand years through a narrator who, like the beloved, is blessed, or cursed, with hundreds of lives, each rebirth announcing a different milieu, a different role. At its core, All Flowers Bloom is a lover’s discourse on desire, its multiple masks and power to make lovers and strangers, and traitors and rescuers out of us.”
—R. Zamora Linmark, author of Rolling the R’s and Leche

All Flowers Bloom is a beguiling book, with an inventive narrative unlike anything I have encountered before. This is an emotional journey through lifetimes and loves and losses. Kawika Guillermo delivers wonderment and surprise, a complex universe, and an unforgettable cast of characters.”
—Doretta Lau, author of How Does a Single Blade of Grass Thank the Sun?

 

Anti-Poverty Measures in America: Scientism and Other Obstacles

Editors, Max J. Skidmore and Biko Koenig

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Anti-Poverty Measures in America brings together a remarkable collection of essays in two groups. The first group consists of papers dealing with the inhibiting effects of scientism—an over-dependence on scientific methodology that is prevalent in the social sciences, particularly in political science. Employing the methods of science is vital where appropriate, but other approaches often will lead to useful insights as well, some of which may be essential. Ignoring them has deleterious effects, such as discouraging the obligation to “speak truth to power.” The second group presents papers dealing with other obstacles to anti-poverty legislation in the United States.

Papers in both groups originated as presentations during annual meetings of the American Political Science Association at panels of the APSA’s Caucus on Poverty, Inequality, and Public Policy; the first group from the San Francisco meeting in 2017, and the second from the 2018 meeting in Boston. All were subsequently published in the journal related to the Caucus: Poverty and Public Policy, sponsored by the Policy Studies Organization. Recognizing their value, the PSO is pleased to present these essays to the public in this volume.

The Editors:
Max J. Skidmore is University of Missouri Curators’ Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He has been Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer to India (where he was CEO of the American Studies Research Centre), and Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong (where he was elected to chair the Board of American Studies). His publications include scores of articles and book chapters, and more than two dozen books. His major emphases are American government and political history, presidents and the presidency, social legislation (especially Social Security), and ideologies and American political thought. His Ph.D. is from the University of Minnesota.

Biko Koenig is Assistant Professor of Government & Public Policy at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, PA. Trained in ethnographic, interview based, and survey research methods, his research approach is grounded in qualitative, fieldwork based, and interpretive approaches to problem solving. His ongoing research involves labor-community coalitions that focus on low income workers and public policy.

 

Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice: Volume 1

Editor: Wendell C. Wallace, PhD

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If your desire is to attain a greater understanding of theoretical frameworks, methodologies, and pragmatic discussions on criminology and criminal justice in the Caribbean, then this is the book for you. This book is a direct response to the call for a Caribbean Criminology as espoused by Ken Pryce (1976) who pointed to the “need to examine the reality of crime from a critical standpoint in the context of the Region’s history of capitalist repression and exploitation, and in terms of the Caribbean’s structural heritage of black working-class styles of protest and modes of response to oppression through slavery down to the present stage of neo-colonialism” (p. 5).

Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice is intended for academics, criminal justice professionals, students, practitioners, policymakers, and interested persons who are desirous of improving their understanding of the challenges that arise when issues related to criminology and criminal justice cross national boundaries in the Caribbean. Conceptualized and edited by the innovative, creative, and forward-thinking scholar and criminologist, Dr. Wendell C. Wallace, Caribbean Perspectives on Criminology and Criminal Justice is a MUST read for any serious practitioner with an interest in criminological and criminal justice issues that impact the Caribbean.

 

How Did I Get Here?: A Story of Interspecies Intimacies (In Nepalese Elephant Stables)

by Kim Idol

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Kim Idol is a writer/instructor at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, partial to dogs, guns, rock-climbing and backpack traveling. She has been in love with Nepal since she first visited 8 years ago. She knew she loved the outdoors and that she would love the Himalayas, but she was unexpectedly charmed by the wildlife and the people she met on her first trip and upon returning home immediately began saving and planning in order to return. Eight years later after a tough year at home, a random mouse-click on the word elephant led her to the site that described working at the elephant stables in Chitwan. So she packed up and left home journaling her experiences in Chitwan as she went.

Nepal is the mountain, the jungle and the foothills. The country is blessed and cursed with being a popular tourist destination and while its people take advantage of the luck they are also engaged in a vigorous fight to preserve their culture and protect the park and the mountains that are home to some of the last surviving members of several endangered species including the one horned rhinoceros, the Asian elephant, the sloth bear and many bird and crocodile species. This book is about the outdoors, about a culture straddling the past and the present and about a woman finding a little peace as she treks through the result. The trip changed this traveler and she suspects she might be seeing Chitwan again.

 

Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative

by Amy M. Green

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Kingsglaive’s Exploration of World War II, Cultural Trauma, and the Plight of Refugees: An Animated Film as Complex Narrative posits that the 2016 film, tied narratively to the video game Final Fantasy XV, merits far more critical attention that it has received. Given that Kingsglaive is both CGI animated and erroneously seen as only a video game tie-in, it has tended to be consistently dismissed by critics. A closer examination of the film reveals a deeply complex narrative, one that contends with the lingering cultural trauma of WWII in Japan, as especially evidenced by images of fire and burning. The film also contends with the plight of refugees and immigrants, both in Japan and around the globe, as recent years have seen a drastic spike in anti-immigrant sentiment. Finally, through the film’s hero and protagonist, Nyx Ulric, Kingsglaive presents a man who is himself suffering from trauma, standing in the present, yet unable to fully imagine a future for himself.

About the author: Amy M. Green received her Ph.D. in literature from UNLV in 2009. She specialized in Shakespeare and 19th century American literature. Today, her work has evolved and she focuses her research on the exciting and evolving field of digital narrative study. She is especially interested in the expanding presence of video games as a compelling source of narrative, one that is necessarily participatory by nature. Further still, video games have long merited the right to be considered as important cultural artifacts and her study and analysis of their stories focuses especially on their historical, political, and social relevance. She also maintains her love of the written word and loves to explore how storytelling, in all of its forms, reveals important aspects of our shared humanity. Most of all, she loves her time in the classroom, sharing ideas and thoughts with students from all backgrounds. Her classes feature the close and careful study of storytelling in both written and digital forms. She is the author of three books, Storytelling in Video Games: The Art of the Digital Narrative, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Trauma, and History in Metal Gear Solid V, and A Cure for Toxic Masculinity: Male Bonding and Friendship in Final Fantasy XV as well as numerous articles.

 

Bunker Diplomacy: An Arab-American in the U.S. Foreign Service

by Nabeel Khoury

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Nabeel Khoury has written a remarkably cogent memoir.  He not only details life in the Foreign Service in a highly entertaining and engaging style, but also provides provocative and telling insights into many of the crises in the Middle East…From Egypt, to ‘The Magic Kingdom’ to Iraq, Morocco and Yemen — Dr. Khoury undertook his duties with a flair that was both bold and unique. I only wish that American policy makers would read his chapters on Morocco and Yemen in particular, and benefit from his general policy recommendations – It might induce some humility and second thoughts on some important “lessons learned.”
Mark G. Hambley
Former Ambassador to Qatar and Lebanon 
This is a gripping narrative that fuses two stories in one.  The first is the academic and political journey of a fascinating man standing between two worlds — Beirut and Washington, Arabness and Westerness, the State Department and the Middle East…The second narrative is a story of America itself as a great power casting a long shadow over the Arab world. The bureaucratic battles described as occurring inside different presidential administrations over four decades reveal a foreign policy often caught between conflicting personalities and demands. Major events like the Gulf War, Iraq War, and Arab Spring are trenchantly retold from the perspective of policymakers, diplomats, and intelligence officers. That these two stories come from the same book is reason enough to read it, but that they come from the career of the same individual will make readers never forget it.
Moulay Hicham el-Alaoui
President Hicham Alaoui Foundation
Nabeel Khoury – an accomplished Arab-American diplomat – offers readers a searing personal journey through America’s trials and tribulations in the Middle East.
William J. Burns, President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Former Deputy Secretary of State

After twenty-five years in the Foreign Service, Dr. Nabeel A. Khoury retired from the U.S. Department of State in 2013 with the rank of Minister Counselor. He taught Middle East and US strategy courses at the National Defense University and Northwestern University. In his last overseas posting, Khoury served as deputy chief of mission at the U.S. embassy in Yemen (2004-2007). In 2003, during the Iraq war, he served as Department spokesperson at US Central Command in Doha and in Baghdad.

Follow Nabeel on Twitter @khoury_nabeel

 

 

 

Transylvania in 1922: Report of the Commission Sent by the American and British Unitarian Churches to Transylvania in 1922

by Louis C. Cornish

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In 1922, a joint commission of US and UK Unitarian Churches traveled to Transylvania after concerns over religions persecution arose in a prior visit in 1920. The Commission was gladdened to see an increase in liberty, but upset to discover that the Romanian government was not wholly supportive of not just Unitarians, but other religious organizations, such as the Roman Catholics, Presbyterians, and Lutherans. Namely, they were upset that endowments and land for these religious institutions was being taken back.

In this work, Louis C. Cornish has compiled an interesting look at Transylvania during this time period. He concludes with a plea to support a Unitarian Mission House in Budapest, which, at the time, had over six thousand Unitarians, and a single church with a seating capacity of 250 to support them.

 

 

Tales of the Mermaid Tavern

by Alfred Noyes

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The Mermaid Tavern was a real place in London. Among other frequenters, a group called the “Fraternity of Sireniacal Gentlemen”, met monthly. They were famed literary figures of the Elizabethan period, Nov 17, 1558 – Mar 24, 1603. In this work, Noyes writes chapters celebrating these figures, including Shakespeare.

Alfred Noyes (1880-1958) was a prolific writer who was able to move successfully across several genres. Though he began in poetry, he also wrote screenplays, science fiction novels, ballads and short stories. He did a great deal of traveling and lecturing, spending time in his birth country of England as well as the United States, Canada, various points in South America, and eventually returning to the Isle of Wight where he spent his final years. He wrote numerous works, including The Loom of Y ears (1902), a biography, William Morris (1908), Some Aspects of Modern Poetry (1924), The Last Man (1940) and his autobiography, Two Worlds for Memory (1953).

 

 

A History of Japanese Mathematics

by David Eugene Smith and Yoshio Mikami

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Yoshio Mikami was an authority on wasan, native Japanese mathematics, and published multiple works on the topic in different languages. A colleague of David Eugene Smith suggested he work with Mikami to produce this volume. As Smith states in the introduction,

“The aim in writing this work has been to give a brief survey of the leading features in the development of the wasan…It is the hope of the authors that this brief survey may serve to show to the West the nature of the mathematics that was indigenous to Japan, and to strengthen the bonds that unite the scholars of the world through an increase in knowledge of and respect for the scientific attainments of a people…”

 

 

 

Contemporaries of Shakespeare

by Algernon Charles Swinburne

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Algernon Charles Swinburne was born on April 5, 1837 in London. Having been born into a wealthy family, he enjoyed extensive education, learned multiple languages, such as French and Italian, and knew them well enough to win awards for writing poetry in those languages. Swinburne did attend college, but did not graduate. Rather, he went on to become a member of intellectual circles that were open to him due to his background, such as the Literary and Philosophical Society in Newcastle upon Tyne, and Lady Pauline Trevelyan’s intellectual circle at Wallington Hall. Swinburne was talented and wrote many critically acclaimed pieces of prose and criticism. He touched on many subjects that were not often written about publicly, such as BSDM and lesbianism.

Swinburne unfortunately battled with ill health throughout his life. His love of drink and algolagnia did not help. He spent time in the French Riviera to reduce his dependency on alcohol. Swinburne created a larger than life persona arguably, and many stories about his exploits circled society. However, Oscar Wilde put a damper on such, stating Swinburne was “a braggart in matters of vice, who had done everything he could to convince his fellow citizens of his homosexuality and bestiality without being in the slightest degree a homosexual or a bestialiser.” By age 42, he ended up in the care of friends, who helped him regain his health. He lived until the age of 72, passing away on April 10, 1909. He wrote enough to fill numerous collections. Archival material on his life can be found at the Leeds University Library.

 

 

 

The Durable Satisfactions of Life

by Charles William Eliot

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Born into a wealthy Boston family, Eliot was fortunate enough to concentrate on his studies and have the ability to attend Boston Latin School, and then later graduate from Harvard University in 1853. However, after the Panic of 1857, Eliot’s family lost much of its wealth. Eliot decided to visit various schools across Europe and study educational systems after being passed over for a professorship.After close to two years abroad, Eliot returned home and enjoyed an appointment at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Eliot remained interested in improving the educational system in the US, which was not seen as offering particularly useful knowledge to an industrializing country. His sentiments were shared by much of the public, and he wrote a well-received article in The Atlantic Monthly about his visions for a reformed educational system. In 1969, after the publication of the article, Eliot would be selected as the president of Harvard.

Eliot, despite trying to remove football from the school, was a popular president, enough so to have served 40 years. He modernized the curriculum, introduced standardized exams, expanded the facilities, and changed the way educational institutions funded themselves. The Durable Satisfactions of Life is a collection of essays and addresses given by Eliot which often reflect on his ethical and religious views of life.

This new edition is dedicated to Arthur Shurcliff.

 

 

 

Early Quaker Education in Pennsylvania

by Thomas Woody PhD

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Born on September 3, 1891, in Thorntown, Indiana, to a Quaker family. Woody would remain in Indiana for his B.A., which he obtained from Indiana University. Later he could go on to earn his PhD in 1918 from Columbia University. Woody wrote a great deal about Quakers, formally known as the Religious Society of Friends, but later focused strongly on education. In addition to “Early Quaker Education in Pennsylvania,” 1920, he also wrote “Quaker Education in the Colony and State of New Jersey” published in 1923. In 1929, he was an awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to study political education on Russian citizens. Woody was interested in and researched learning processes across a variety of people and places. One of his most famous works is A History of Women’s Education in the United States, published in 1929.

This new edition is dedicated to the Friends Meeting in Washington D.C. and its library.

 

 

 

A New Art of Brewing Beer, Ale, and Other Sorts of Liquors: So as to Render Them More Healthfull to the Body and Agreeable to Nature

by Thomas Tryon

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

Jack’s Ward; or, The Boy Guardian

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

Phil the Fiddler: The Story of a Young Street-Musician

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

The Tin Box and What it Contained

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

Brave and Bold, or, The Fortunes of Robert Rushton

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

Bound to Rise, or, Up the Ladder

by Horatio Alger Jr., Introduction by Dr. Wallace E. Boston Jr. 

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The young Horatio Alger heroes often sold newspapers or delivered telegrams, a reminder of how technology has moved on. Alger’s tales created youthful heroes whose persistence and pluck triumphed over enormous odds, often having to educate themselves by a flickering candle and late at night. But they hoped for better things and in the Alger novels their diligence and hard work won the day and they ended up getting the educations they deserved and the success that their exemplary morality earned. The reader will find this prototypical Alger story both a good read and food for thought in an era when the technology has indeed moved on but the challenges have remained.

The introduction is provided by Dr. Wallace Boston, President of the American Public University System and a Horatio Alger enthusiast.

 

 

 

Occultists and Mystics of All Ages

by Ralph Shirley

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Ralph Shirley was born on December 30, 1865 into the aristocracy. As a result, he enjoyed the trappings of wealth, and was educated at Oxford University. He went on to become the director of William Rider & Son, a publisher of books on what is today considered New Age topics: occultism, astrology and psychic research, among other topics. In addition, Shirley founded Occult Review in 1905, helped lead the International Institute for Psychic Investigation, and also served as editor and author of several books on related subjects, including out of body experiences and astrology. Arguably, his most popular book is The Mystery of the Human Double: The Case for Astral Projection, originally published in 1938, which was also his final book. Ralph passed away a few years after its publication on December 29, 1946.

This new edition is dedicated to Dr, Nancy Sundow, a leader in the bibliography of psychic studies.

 

 

 

British Sculpture and Sculptors of Today

by M. H. Spielmann

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Marion Harry Alexander Spielmann was born in London on May 22, 1858 into quite a large family. Spielmann attended University College School, and later University College London. Shortly after, he began working for the Pall Mall Gazette, from 1883-1890, where he became a celebrated art critic. He later was the editor of Magazine of Art, founder of Black and White, juror for the 1898 Brussels Fine Art Exhibition, and contributor to many publications, including the Illustrated London News.

During a time when Impressionism was gaining popularity, Spielmann inserted himself frequently in debates over aesthetics, and made spaces for debates to brew. Spielmann did not care for modern art and was considered to be a traditionalist.

This new edition is dedicated to Michel Langlais de Langlade.

 

 

 

The Image and Other Plays

by Lady Gregory

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Isabella Augusta, who went as Lady Gregory, was a famed Irish dramatist. Deeply involved in all things theater, including being a theater owner. She primarily was a writer, and received much accolades for her work, later being recognized for spawning the Irish Literary Revival. In part, this was due to her writing plays based on Irish folklore and mythology, which helped give it renewed power and value. She also used “Kiltartanese” which is a mix of English with Gaelic.Lady Gregory enjoyed a life of estates, world travel, salons and privilege. Born to a family with a 6,000 acre estate, she married well to Sir William Henry Gregory. She and her husband traveled to India, Egypt and Italy, among other places. Influenced by her experiences, Lady Gregory wrote in support of political causes such as the Urabi Revolt in Egypt, as well as support for Irish nationalism. She spent much of her later years in theater, until she passed away at the age of 80 due to breast cancer.

 

 

 

Hannah More

by Charlotte M. Yonge

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Hannah More was born in 1745 in the village of Fishponds, located near Bristol. Her father was a teacher, which helped to ensure that Hannah and her siblings were educated. She was once engaged, but the nuptials did not take place. Instead, More enjoyed an annual payment from the broken engagement from her would-be husband, William Turner. More used the money to allow her to live her dreams–to be a writer. She wrote a great deal, especially poetry in her younger days. In 1787 she became more involved in the abolition movement. A year later, her poem, “Slavery, A Poem” became a powerful call to action against slavery by bringing attention to Britain’s role and the blight on Christianity from the ungodly practice.

She continued to fight against slavery, but also turned her attentions towards building schools for impoverished children. More also became more involved in her religious community, and her writing took on more evangelical, including writing several religious tracts. She worked in conjunction with Sunday schools to create programs to combat illiteracy. She passed away in 1833, after seeing Britain finally abolish slavery.

 

 

 

Annals of the Hobby Club of New York City, 1912-1920

by New York Hobby Club

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In 1908, the Hobby Club was established as a gentlemen’s club. Planned to be a space for people to showcase their special interests, the “object of the Club shall be to encourage the collection of literary, artistic and scientific works; to aid in the development of literary, artistic and scientific matters; to promote social and literary intercourse among its members, and the discussion and consideration of various literary and economic subjects.”

Only a maximum of fifty men were allowed to be members, and in order to gain admission to the club, one had to prove they had an interesting, well defined hobby. Members gathered around extravagant dinners while each regaled one another with collections, tales and other displays of their findings.

This work offers some insight on the club, especially membership, topics of talks, and details on the dinners they shared.

 

 

 

Proceedings of the General Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star at its Fourth Stated Meeting, August 17-23, 1883

by General Grand Chapter

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

Although the Order of the Eastern Star at one time claimed ties to orders in the seventeenth and eighteenth century Swedish royal court, the consensus is that it was largely created as a companion secret society to Freemasonry in thenineteenth century. Both men who are Masons and women with a family connection to Masons are members, and chapters are found as far afield as Scotland and Australia.

 

 

 

 

The London Friends’ Meetings

by William Beck and Thomas Frederick Ball

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The London Friends’ Meetings is a significant expansion on a lecture given by William Beck in 1856, “The London Friends’ Meeting-houses and Their Associations.” Co-author, Thomas Frederick Ball spent a great time doing research in minute-books and other holdings of the Friends in London. The records offer a look at the very long history of the Friends, offering primary sources prior to 1740, and up to 1869.

In this work, Beck and Ball offer both depth and breadth, and offers a look at London’s history, and how it impacted the development of the Friends. The research into the holdings of various groups gives an overview of religious and interpersonal relationships as they developed within different Friends congregations.

 

 

 

 

Charles Francis Adams, 1835-1915: An Autobiography

by Charles Francis Adams

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Charles Francis Adams enjoyed a variety of roles during his life. He was born on May 27, 1835 in Boston into a life of prominence, being the grandson of John Quincy Adams. In 1856, Adams graduated from Harvard University. A few years later he served in the Union Army during the Civil War in 1861. He was considered to have served the Union Army well as a lieutenant colonel. After he resigned from the Army in 1865, he began working with the Massachusetts Railroad Commission. He eventually found his way as the president of the Union Pacific Railroad in 1884. Adams pursued policies that supported business rights over those of consumers, feeling that the general public was sometimes hostile or unstable. However, these sentiments backfired while he was the president of Union Pacific, since businesses refused to collaborate and forward Adams’ policies. Adams refused to work with labor unions, like the Knights of Labor, which resulted in a horrific massacre of Chinese workers that Adams brought in. By 1890, owner Jay Gould had Adams forced out of his role.A few years later, Adams began working for the Massachusetts Park Commission, where he primarily assisted with planning park developments across the state. He also focused on historical writing, and became president of the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1895. This particular work is autobiographical, but was published posthumously. Adams passed away on May 20, 1915 and is buried in Quincy, Massachusetts.

 

 

 

 

Old Quaker Meeting-Houses

by John Russell Hayes

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John Russell Hayes (1866-1945) was a Quaker educator, poet, and worked as a librarian for Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania. He was born in 1866, to William and Rachel Hayes, a family of Quaker farmers. Hayes spent much of his time on his family’s farm, which was located near the Brandywine River. He attended Swarthmore College, graduating in 1888. A few years later, he married his wife, Emma Gawthrop, in 1892, who also had attended and graduated from Swarthmore the same year. Afterwards, he went on to attend the Law School of the University of Pennsylvania, then Harvard, Oxford, and the University of Strassburg, in Germany.However, Hayes’ loves were literature and his hometown, so he returned to Swarthmore College to teach literature, but then went on to become the college Librarian from 1906-1935. While working at Swarthmore College, Hayes wrote numerous books, often about Quakerism, or of poetry. He and his wife had three daughters, who all also went on to graduate from Swarthmore College. Hayes died Dec. 29, 1945. His papers are held at the Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College. The collection contains letters received by Hayes, various diaries, and other papers owned by Haynes.This edition is dedicated to Friends Meeting of Washington DC, which, since 1807, has been such a force for good in the capital.

 

 

 

 

The Anti-Slavery Crusade: A Chronicle of the Gathering Storm

by Jesse Macy

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Jesse Macy was born into a large Quaker family in Indiana on June 21, 1842. His family relocated to Lynnville, Iowa, in order to farm. Macy was educated, starting his college career at the age of 17 at nearby Iowa College (which would later become Grinnell College). When the Civil War broke out, he served in the Union Army. Afterwards, he returned to earn his degree in 1870. He enjoyed school and went on to pursue a PhD at Johns Hopkins University. After graduation, he returned to teach at Iowa College, where he remained for over forty years. His focus was political science, and he spent much of his time encouraging education, which was controversial since studying evolution was still considered a “dangerous doctrine.”

In addition to teaching and serving as a public intellectual, Macy wrote numerous books, typically relating to government, such as Our Government: How it Grew, What It Does, and How It Does It (1896), and Party Organization and Machinery (1904). His last published work was The Anti-Slavery Crusade (1919), published the same year he passed away.

This new edition is dedicated to the members of the Friends Meeting of Washington.

 

 

 

 

New Wars for Old: Being a Statement of Radical Pacifism in Terms of Force Versus Non-Resistance: with Special Reference to the Facts and Problems of the Great War

by John Haynes Holmes

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John Haynes Holmes was born on November 29, 1879 in Philadelphia, although he spent much of his youth in the Boston area. He grew up within the Unitarian church, and was extremely close to his grandfather, John Haynes. While he initially planned to enter business, as his grandfather did, he ended up graduating from Harvard Divinity School in 1904. He married the same time he graduated from school, and he and his wife, Madeleine Baker, relocated to Dorchester, Massachusetts, for Holmes to take up a position at a church. However he and Madeleine were deeply interested in hymns, and the connection helped Holmes find a new role at the Church of the Messiah in New York City. There Holmes combined his love of religion with a genuine desire to improve society. He delivered and published sermons such as “Christianity and Socialism”, where he found that Socialism was “the religion of Jesus, and of all the great prophets of God who have lived and died for men.”

Holmes went on to help found several powerful organizations seeking justice. In 1908, the Unitarian Fellowship for Social Justice was founded by Holmes and twenty other people. Holmes also helped found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the American branch of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and the War Resistance League.Although some people had rebuked Holmes during World War I when he preached pacifism, he was still very popular and drew people to wherever he preached. His goal was to create a uniquely multicultural and religiously diverse congregation, which he successfully did through The Community Church of New York. Holmes has had a profoundly positive impact, not just on the Unitarian Church, but the fabric of the United States.