British Sculpture and Sculptors of Today

by M. H. Spielmann

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Marion Harry Alexander Spielmann was born in London on May 22, 1858 into quite a large family. Spielmann attended University College School, and later University College London. Shortly after, he began working for the Pall Mall Gazette, from 1883-1890, where he became a celebrated art critic. He later was the editor of Magazine of Art, founder of Black and White, juror for the 1898 Brussels Fine Art Exhibition, and contributor to many publications, including the Illustrated London News.

During a time when Impressionism was gaining popularity, Spielmann inserted himself frequently in debates over aesthetics, and made spaces for debates to brew. Spielmann did not care for modern art and was considered to be a traditionalist.

This new edition is dedicated to Michel Langlais de Langlade.

 

 

 

The Genesis of Art-Form

by George Lansing Raymond

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When on July 12, 1929, George Raymond died of pneumonia at the age of 89 he had enjoyed a crowded life as a professor and popular author of esthetics. He was born into fortunate circumstances, having a father who was one of the first mayors of Chicago. In 1862, he graduated from Williams, and went on to graduate from Princeton Seminary in 1865. For 25 years he taught at Princeton University, and then he began teaching at George Washington University from 1905 to 1912.

He became well-known for his writings on esthetic history. He combined psychology, history, art and biology in his theories. He also wrote on ethics, natural law, oration and poetry. His writings were so well received that he was nominated seven times for a Nobel Prize in Literature.

 

 

The Art of the Vatican: A Brief History of the Palace, and an Account of the Principal Works of Art Within Its Walls

by Mary Knight Potter

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Mary Knight Potter was born in Boston into a family of artists. While she initially studied art herself, she preferred writing. Unfortunately, she battled health ailments. In September of 1915, she had married longtime friend and musician, Thomas Parker Currier, but sadly passed away only three weeks after. She left a great deal of writing behind, having published numerous books on art, including The Art of the Louvre, The Art of the Venice Academy, Love in Art, and a book of short stories called Ten Beautiful Years. Potter was an esteemed, world-renowned art critic, as well as a prized writer of fiction. Her stories appeared in Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s, and To-day’s Magazines, among others.

 

 

gray cover with a sketched image of Ward in the center

John Quincy Adams Ward: An Appreciation

by Adeline Adams

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John Quincy Adams Ward (June 29, 1830 – May 1, 1910) was a sculptor. He was born in Ohio to a family of means. He enjoyed playing on their 600 acre estate, and in his early childhood enjoyed making sculptures out of malleable sediment from a nearby creek. He began studying with a local family friend and potter in his adolescence, but then became discouraged after seeing talented artists at a sculpture show. He studied medicine until he became quite ill. Afterwards, he decided to return to sculpture. He was most well-known for creating busts of famous male figures, most notably his work of George Washington which still stands in New York City. In addition to sculpting, Ward served as the President of the National Academy of Design for a number of years. He also founded, and then became President of the National Sculpture Society. He served on numerous boards and committees which sought to advance art, including being one of the original members of the Board of Trustees of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Adeline Adams (1859–1948) was predominantly a writer who focused on artist biographies, but she also wrote poetry. She was born in Boston, well educated and had a lifelong appreciation for the arts. She was also involved in the women’s suffrage movement.

 

 

 

 

An Outline History of Sculpture for Beginners and Students: with Complete Indexes and Numerous Illustrations

by Clara Erskine Clement

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Clara Erskine Clement was born on August 28, 1834 to John and Harriet Bethiah Erskine in St. Louis, Missouri. She was able to get an education through private tutors. After her first marriage, she relocated to Massachusetts. Throughout her life, she wrote a great deal, primarily on art history, including such works as Handbook of Legendary and Mythological Art (Boston, 1871), Stories of Art and Artists (1886), Women Artists in Europe and America (1903) and Women in the Fine Arts (1906). She loved traveling, and was known especially for her travels to Turkey, Palestine, and parts of Europe. She did not let age stop her, and climbed the Great Pyramid when she was 66. She passed away in 1916 while in Brookline, Massachusetts of chronic myocarditis. Her papers are held by Princeton University.This new edition is dedicated to the members of the National Sculpture Society.

 

 

 

The Art of the Exposition: Personal Impressions of the Architecture, Sculpture, Mural Decorations, Color Scheme & Other Aesthetic Aspects of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition

by Eugen Neuhaus

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Eugen Neuhaus was born on August 18, 1879, in Germany. He moved to the United States in 1904, ultimately becoming a US citizen in 1911. He began teaching various art and design classes at colleges in northern California, including the University of California. He lectured at numerous colleges, including internationally over the years, before ultimately retiring from the University of California in 1949, at the age of 70. He died at the age of 84 in 1963, in Berkeley.

One of the highlights of Neuhaus’ career was his assistance in developing the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, held in San Francisco during 1915. This work, The Art of the Exposition, is derived from lectures he gave to the public about its design and development, which were very well received. The Panama-Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco, 1915 was an event celebrating the development of the Panama Canal. Many beautiful pieces of architecture were developed for the Exposition, perhaps the most notable being the Palace of Fine Arts. A number of members of the National Sculpture Society exhibited, and this new edition is dedicated to their memory.

 

 

Lectures on Sculpture: On the Death of Thomas Banks, Antonio Conova, and John Flaxman

by John Flaxman R.A., Contributions by Sir Richard Westmacott R.A.

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John Flaxman (1755-1826) was an extraordinarily popular British sculptor, illustrator, and teacher. He earned his start by creating funerary monuments. Despite moving on to creating different sculpture forms and art in different media, he was still influenced by his early form of bas-reliefs and incorporated it into other projects. Having married an intelligent, hard working wife, Anne Denman, the pair enjoyed a lot of success and support of one another. Together they enjoyed many years in Rome, with Flaxman illustrating and sculpting a great deal. after nearly eight years, they returned to England, where Flaxman was made an Associate of the Royal Academy, where he exhibited for a few years before he was made a full Academician, where he went on to teach.

Flaxman remains an extremely influential figure. University College London has much of Flaxman’s work in terms of writings, drawings, and plasters and the famed Flaxman Gallery. Sadly, some of it was damaged during air raids of World War II.

 

Select Passages from Ancient Writers: Illustrative of the History of Greek Sculpture

by H. Stuart Jones M.A.

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Henry Stuart Jones (1867-1939) was a British scholar who worked at University of Oxford, Trinity College, and University College of Wales at Aberystwyth. He did quite well in Wales, as he learned Welsh, and served on a number of councils, such as the National Library of Wales. He was a prolific author and primarily interested in ancient Roman and Greek art and history. His other publications included Classical Rome (1910), Fresh Light on Roman Bureaucracy (1920), and The Roman Empire 29 BC–476 AD (1909).

 

A Manual of Ancient Sculpture, Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek, Roman: With One Hundred and Sixty Illustrations

by George Redford FRCS

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Free download for National Sculpture Society members

On October 26, 1895, George Redford passed away after an illness. He had lived 80 years, his life spanning very different callings. He was remembered as one being well traveled in art circles, a fan of the old masters in particular. As the art correspondent for the London Times, his judgments were well regarded. He was worked with the Art Treasures Exhibition of Manchester, as well as serving as a Commissioners of the Leeds Exhibition. He was Registrar of the Crystal Palace Collection of Sculpture in 1853-1854; Curator of the Art Treasures Exhibition in Manchester, 1857; and Commissioner for the National Exhibition of Works of Art, Leeds, 1868. His memorable art library was sold by Christie’s, London, on March 18, 1890.

Redford had a very interesting and varied life. He was not always involved in art, as he was once on the battlefield. Redford was a medical professional who had served in the Army Medical Service during the Crimean War.

 

Wood Sculpture: From Ancient Egypt to the End of the Gothic Period

by Alfred Maskell F.S.A.

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Alfred Maskell was an artist, primarily a photographer, who worked tirelessly to advance the art. He was a member of The Linked Ring, an invitation-only group that wanted to advance photography as an art form. Members encouraged experimentation with the photographic process. The organization was founded in 1892 by Maskell, with George Davison and Henry Van der Weyde. The Linked Ring was at its peak between its founding, until roughly 1909. Maskell, along with Robert Memachy, helped to develop the gum-bichromate printing, which is able to create a unique painterly image from negatives.

 

Oration on the Unveiling of the Statue of Samuel Francis DuPont: Rear Admiral, U.S.N., at Washington, DC on December 20, 1884

by Hon. Thomas F. Bayard

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Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont (1803-1865) served in the United States Navy, specifically during the Mexican- American War and the Civil War. His uncle, Eleuthere Irenee du Pont, was the founder of what is commonly known as the DuPont chemical concern, but is officially E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. Du Pont’s family was unable to financially support his education, so Samuel enlisted in the Navy. His family’s connections allowed him to receive appointment to midshipman by President James Madison. He had an illustrious until questions about his judgment in an attempt to capture Charleston during the Civil War became an issue when the blockade failed. Du Pont was so anguished by this that he relieved himself of command on July 5, 1863. Later events proved that he was not at fault, and nearly two decades after his death in 1865, a bronze sculpture of Du Pont was dedicated on December 20, 1884. It was replaced in 1921 by a memorial fountain that still stands today, one that was sculpted by Daniel Chester French and designed by Henry Bacon.

The statue was moved by the Du Pont family in 1920 to Wilmington, Delaware. Dupont Circle is a popular attraction for locals and tourists alike in DC. The location has slowly changed its name from Du Pont to Dupont, so this work illustrating the deeds for which the area received its namesake is especially important.

This edition is dedicated to Patricia Fitzgerald, the amiable mainstay of the Women’s National Democratic Club, longtime Dupont Circle anchor.