Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington: Volume 12

by the Philosophical Society of Washington

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at Cosmos Club, in whose founding Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when Cosmos was founded, it was feared that Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all present members of Philosophical Society were invited to join as founding members of Cosmos. This volume demonstrates extraordinary history of the Society.

 

 

Unworkable Conservatism: Small Government, Freemarkets, and Impracticality

by Max J. Skidmore

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Unworkable Conservatism looks at what passes these days for “conservative” principles—small government, low taxes, minimal regulation—and demonstrates that they are not feasible under modern conditions. First, for many reasons, they are difficult, at best, to implement. Second, if they are put into place, they please no one, not even those who advocated them in the first place.

Most people now are too young to remember the presidency of Mr. Conservatism, himself, Ronald Reagan. If they are old enough, they generally have forgotten how dissatisfied those on the right were with the Reagan administration. Frustrated at not being able to bring themselves to criticize the Republican Party’s idol directly, they had to be content to screech at Reagan’s aides: “let Reagan be Reagan!”

Along with direct analysis and criticism, this book takes an innovative approach, and incorporates some of the author’s review essays. Using other important works as an intellectual launching pad, it adds to them and reveals numerous overlooked yet vital facts that should have been obvious even to casual observers. It makes clear that things in America have gone very wrong, how and why this has happened, and what might be done about it.

Max J. Skidmore is University of Missouri Curators’ Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Thomas Jefferson Fellow at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He has been Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer to India, where he directed the American Studies Research Centre, and Senior Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hong Kong, where he headed the American Studies Programme. Among his numerous books are several dealing with the American presidency, with Social Security and Medicare, with American political thought, and with other topics, including American highway travel in the early 20th century. He is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. His Ph.D. is from the University of Minnesota.

Beijing Express: How To Understand New China

by David Baverez

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ABOUT THE BOOK

2017. The new President of France just took office. He knows his country needs radical reforms. The question is how to make his mark from the word go and how to make a clean break from his predecessors’ policies. He has an idea: instead of going to Berlin on his first official foreign visit – as is customary – why not go to Beijing? What better example is there of a country where radical reforms have met with success? In order to get a better idea of how things are changing in China, he asks someone who lives and works there and has daily contact with Chinese people to come with him.
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During the flight from Paris to Beijing on the presidential jet, he and his traveling companion have a lively, quick-fire conversation about China. What comes to light is far from the preconceived ideas held in the West. We see the true nature of the new Chinese cultural revolution, backed by technology, service industries, and the thirst for consumer goods – an unexpected source of inspiration when it comes to reforming Western economies.

ABOUT THE EDITOR

David Baverez is a private investor. He has been based in Hong Kong since 2012, where he finances and advises various starts-up. Previously, he was a fund manager for 15 years, first at Fidelity Investments in London and Boston, then as the Founding Partner of KDA Capital, a European Equity fund, until 2010.

He first published Beijing Express in France (Paris-Pékin Express – La Nouvelle Chine racontée au futur Président ; Éditions François Bourin, 2017). He is also is the author ofGénération Tonique – L’Occident est complètement à l’Ouest (Plon, 2015) and is a regular columnist in French newspapers L’Opinion and Les Echos.

 

 

A Frenchman in the Gold Rush: The Journal of Ernest De Massey, Argonaut of 1849

by Ernest De Massey, Translated by Marguerite Eyer Wilbur

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Ernest De Massey arrived in the United States in 1849. He went to San Francisco, and became a retailer, since he had the capital and came from some wealth. However, the lure of the Gold Rush was too much for him, so he decided to close his shop and follow many of his customers into the mountains in hopes of striking it rich. He tried prospecting in multiple areas, including Klamath River. Like many, he left with empty pockets and dashed dreams, though he was very fortunate to have kept his health. Prospecting was very arduous, and frequently dangerous. De Massey only lasted five months before giving up, after falling seriously ill. He decided to return to San Francisco and the somewhat more stable life of an entrepreneur. But in 1857 he returned to Europe. De Massey’s fascinating first hand account illustrates how the Gold Rush mesmerized so many.

 

Ritual Order of the Rainbow for Girls

by W. Mark Sexson

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point. It deals with an order for girls and young women that has become worldwide.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable. Included are titles about youth movements such as Rainbow, DeMolay, and Job’s Daughters.

 

Bees in Amber: A Little Book of Thoughtful Verse

by John Oxenham

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So many writers work hard, yet unsuccessfully reach a mass audience. In a few cases, they are pleasantly surprised. William Arthur Dunkerley (1852-1941) could count himself among the fortunate. Born in 1852 in England, Dunkerley became a publisher. However, he also wanted to become a writer. He wrote this small book of prose, which is heavily influenced by his religious beliefs, as, among other professions, he was a deacon and teacher at the Ealing Congregational Church. It struck a chord with so many readers that it went on to sell thousands of copies and become a Victorian bestseller. Interestingly, though Dunkerley wrote prose under his own name, he used the nom de plume, John Oxenham, for his poetry. He was a prolific writer as well as a journalist, especially during World War I, and also a novelist and poet. In addition to all this writing and religious service, Dunkerley was a politician and served as a mayor of Worthing in Sussex.

 

 

Iceland: Horseback Tours in Saga Land

by W. S. C. Russell

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Waterman Spaulding Chapman Russell, wrote under the much abbreviated name, W. S. C. Russell (1871-1918). Though a many year resident of New Hampshire, he enjoyed traveling, particularly to Iceland. He was fascinated with the country, its fire and ice and sagas, and surprised by the scant ethnographic, geological, or other studies of it. He took it upon himself to study the area, and wrote multiple books on Iceland, including Askja, A Volcano in the Interior of Iceland (1917). Russell spent a great deal of time in Iceland, living there for a while, and because of this, he felt his accounts of the region and its people were superior. He energetically encouraged others to visit, study and learn more about what he felt was one of the most fascinating places in the world.

 

A Century of French Fiction: Balzac, Flaubert, Stendhal and More

by Benjamin W. Wells PhD

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Benjamin Wells takes on an epic task: to catalog 115 authors, and 688 pieces of writing. Rather than focus on the popularity of the piece or the author, Wells groups them together by place or birth, historical context, and writing style, choosing to spend the most time on specific examples of writing he finds are most unique and excellent. Wells focuses on Stendhal, Balzac, Zola, and de Maupassant, and offers a historical contextualization of their writings and their impact on society.

 

 

Swiss Freemasonry: A Historical Sketch with Organization, Principles and Constitution

by Dr. Bernard Perrelet

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

 

 

The Little Confectioner: 19th Century Candy and Cake

by H. Hueg

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Herman Hueg wrote four books on confections and baking, including Ornamental Confectionery and the Art of Baking in All its Branches (1905), and Book of Designs for Bakers and Confectioners (1896). Hueg was a renounced baker and confectioner. He expanded his reach by moving into selling tools and other implements for bakers to help replicate the skilled work, such as molds and stencils. This approach is taken in this volume, which begins with a series of recipes for sugar spinning, caramels, nut bars, taffy, ice cream, bonbons, syrups and more. The latter portion of the book has several pages dedicated to interesting baking implements, which are nicely illustrated.

 

 

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington: Volume III

by the Philosophical Society of Washington

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at Cosmos Club, in whose founding Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when Cosmos was founded, it was feared that Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all present members of Philosophical Society were invited to join as founding members of Cosmos. This volume demonstrates extraordinary history of the Society.

 

 

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington: Volume VII

by the Philosophical Society of Washington

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at Cosmos Club, in whose founding Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when Cosmos was founded, it was feared that Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all present members of Philosophical Society were invited to join as founding members of Cosmos. This volume demonstrates the extraordinary history of the Society.

 

 

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington: Volume IX

by the Philosophical Society of Washington

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at Cosmos Club, in whose founding Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when Cosmos was founded, it was feared that Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all present members of Philosophical Society were invited to join as founding members of Cosmos. This volume demonstrates the extraordinary history of Society.

 

 

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington: Volume X

by the Philosophical Society of Washington

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at Cosmos Club, in whose founding Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when Cosmos was founded, it was feared that Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all present members of Philosophical Society were invited to join as founding members of Cosmos. This volume demonstrates the extraordinary history of Society.

 

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington: Volume 15

by Philosophical Society of Washington

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at Cosmos Club, in whose founding Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when Cosmos was founded, it was feared that Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all present members of Philosophical Society were invited to join as founding members of Cosmos. This volume demonstrates the extraordinary history of Society.

 

 

The Etchings of Rembrandt: A Study and History

by P. G. Hamerton

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Philip Gilbert Hamerton (1834-1894) was an Englishman who was devoted to the arts in numerous forms. He became an orphan at the age of ten; his mother died giving birth to him, and he ended up living with two aunts when he turned five. Five years after that, his father died. At first, he tried his hand at poetry, but his work was not well received. He moved onto painting, in particular, landscape painting. However, his work was also not well-received. On a more positive note, while he was painting in the Scottish Highlands, he met his wife, Eugénie Gindriez. While his painting and poetry was not fawned over, his book, Painter’s Camp in the Highlands, published in 1863, was lauded. Due to the praise, Hamerton stuck with art criticism, and went on to write other works, such as Etching and Etchers (1866) and Contemporary French Painters (1867). He also wrote novels, biographies, and reflections on society.

This new edition is dedicated to Gordon Alt, whose energetic lifelong efforts for the arts have saved many important works that otherwise would have perished.

 

 

The Bahai Movement: A Series of Nineteen Papers

by Charles Mason Remey

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Charles Mason Remey (1874-1974) was the son of Admiral George Collier Remey and grew up in Washington DC, at 1527 New Hampshire Avenue NW, which is now the home of Westphalia Press and the Policy Studies Organization, and the American Political Science Association.. He drew detailed plans and did a survey of the house, which are deposited in the Library of Congress. He studied to be an architect at Cornell (1893-1896) and the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris (1896-1903), where he learned about the Baha’i faith, and quickly adopted it.

In 1903, Remey returned to Washington, DC, and wrote numerous works on Baha’i theology and practices. He spent much of his time traveling to teach and discuss the Baha’i faith, and at the same time developing architectural plans, with the occasional class taught at George Washington University. Remey wrote extensively, and his papers are held at the National Baha’i Archives, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, Princeton University, Yale University, and the Iowa Historical Society.

This new edition is dedicated to Professor Steven Smith, whose patient efforts to make historic 1527 New Hampshire safe for future generations deserve thanks and recognition.

 

 

The Capture and Execution of John Brown: A Tale of Martyrdom

by Elijah Avey

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Slavery was truly an awful institution that, even today in its legacy, continues to plague the United States. During its height, abolitionists “waved the bloody flag” and vigorously protested to end it, though it took plunging the nation into the Civil War to result in it being finally eradicated. One person that took a powerful stand against “the peculiar institution” was John Brown. Though Brown had led forces against pro-slavery opponents earlier, it wasn’t until 1859 when he grabbed the national stage by leading forces, particularly enslaved African Americans, at Harper’s Ferry. The movement was ultimately unsuccessful, and Brown was captured and tried for treason against the Commonwealth of Virginia (before Harper’s Ferry was part of West Virginia). He was hanged despite vocal opposition from his supporters. Yet, his work as an abolitionist created ripples of tension that significantly fueled the drift towards war. This work is written by Elijah Avery, who offers a detailed, eyewitness account of the events, and contextualizes John Brown’s life.

This new edition is dedicated to the efforts of the American Public University System to preserve the artifacts of historic Charles Town in West Virginia with its associations with John Brown.

 

The History of Men’s Raiment

by The Edson Lewis Company

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Strouse & Brothers, originating out of Baltimore, published this unique tract on the history of men’s fashion in the European world. The work begins with a very brief history of fashion, and then links the Strouse & Brothers firm to that history of high quality fashion. It offers a fascinating look at early forms of advertising in the United States, and of course, fashion and changing tastes. Strouse & Brothers considered itself a purveyor of “High Art fashion.” The high quality illustrations included reveal that “High Art fashion” has developed very different meanings over the years. For Strouse & Brothers, it simply meant well-tailored suits paired with fashionable hats in 1910. Strouse & Brothers enjoyed a long history in Baltimore, becoming one of the largest clothiers in the city. It was founded in 1868 by Leopold Strouse, one of six brothers who emigrated from Germany to the United States.

 

The Prisoners of 1776: A Relic of the Revolution

by Rev. R. Livesey

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Most of this work is not by Rev. R. Livesey, but rather by Charles Herbert, who was made prisoner by the English during the Revolutionary War. The journal begins around November 15, 1776, shortly after Herbert was captured while on the brigantine, Dolton. While imprisoned, he suffered from smallpox, but recovered and then was sent to Old Mill Prison, located in Plymouth, England, in 1777. He was held there until March 19, 1779, when he was exchanged for English prisoners. Herbert tried to escape many times, and even succeeded once, but he, along with a majority of other prisoners, were recaptured. After his release, Herbert went on to be married to Holly Butler on November 8, 1783, and earned a living as a block-maker, until he died at the age of 49 on September 4, 1808. The journal was written in code and had to be translated. Special Collections at the University of Delaware Library in Newark, Delaware has archival holdings on this work.

 

Peasant Art in Sweden, Lapland and Iceland

by Charles Holme

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Art made by those not traditionally trained has several terms, including outsider art, folk art, raw art and peasant art. This particular work offers a carefully chosen selection of both the decorative
and fine arts of Sweden, Iceland, and the northern-most region of Finland. A comprehensive survey, it includes paintings, jewelry, textiles, metalwork, carving, furniture and pottery.

Charles Holme (1848-1923) was an art critic who promoted peasant art, and edited numerous books to share the artwork, including Old Houses in Holland (1913); Peasant Art in Russia (1912); and The Art of the Book (1914). Holme was born in England, and enjoyed the privileged life as the son and heir of a silk manufacturer. He also worked in the same field, even expanding the business into Japan. He retired in 1892 and then turned full-time to the arts. He began The Studio: An Illustrated Magazine of Fine and Applied Art, serving  as editor from 1895-1919, when he retired, and his son, Charles Geoffrey Holme took over.

The History of the Order of the Eastern Star Among Colored People

by Mrs. S. Joe Brown

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Social history as a corrective to a historiography is often too limited to diplomacy and wars. It began an upward trajectory as early as the 1930s, but it remains constrained by the frustrating cost and availability of materials that even great research libraries lack. This volume is a case in point.

Fraternal movements like Freemasonry have impacted society for hundreds of years. Yet, over time research into their undoubted influence has been handicapped by their codes of secrecy, arcane rituals, and the paucity of continuing tertiary research projects. As a step towards “more light” Westphalia Press has produced a number of scarce titles that will be helpful in understanding the “secret empire” of lodges, initiations, and (candidly) the deliberately inscrutable.

This volume sheds light on African-American masonic organizations. Here, Mrs. S. Joe Brown writes of the history of the Order of the Eastern Star, highlighting its developments across the United States, including Indiana, Georgia, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Minnesota, South Carolina, New York, Texas, Alabama and Washington, DC.

 

Adrift on an Ice-Pan

by Wilfred Thomason Grenfell

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Snow and ice can present significant danger, which can produce considerable self-examination. In Adrift on an Ice-Pan, Wilfred Thomason Grenfell discusses his experience of being trapped on an ice-pan. Grenfell was an Englishman who became a doctor and decided to serve the remote populace of Labrador, comprised of fishers and villages with limited access. This book carries a very moralistic and Christian approach, and also offers conflicting thoughts and portrayals on the value of life. As Grenfell states in the introduction, “ is little book is only the story of a Doctor in the wilds. His name and his identity do not matter. They will soon be forgotten anyhow. It was only a nameless fisher-lad whose life was at issue.”

Grenfell was born in 1865 in Chester, England to a family of several distinguished scholars and members of the military. Grenfell enjoyed his childhood in a rural area, and was ingrained with a deep appreciation for nature. The advantages of family wealth and pedigree allowed him to be able to concentrate on schooling, at Marlborough College, University of London, and then an internship at London Hospital. Seeking adventure, an advisor recommended Grenfell join the National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen. At the time, it served four hospitals, with isolated persons attended to by doctors driving dogsleds across a very treacherous landscape.

 

Individual Cookery: 357 Recipes

by H. Mabel Hutchings

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This collection of old recipes was aimed at those cooking for one, either for the self, or while caring for the infirm. The recipes are very quick to execute, often uncomplicated, and do not involve many ingredients. They shed light on the now forgotten tastes of times past. Recipes include numerous gruels, salads, sauces, custards, fruit soups, egg based dishes, sandwiches, and drinks. Some are straightforward accounts of well-known dishes, while others are unusual, including maple sandwiches, pineapple nutcream, and cherry soup.

 

A Series of Twelve Articles Introductory to the Study of the Baha’i Teachings

by Charles Mason Remey

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Charles Mason Remey (1874-1974) was the son of Admiral George Collier Remey and grew up in Washington DC, at 1527 New Hampshire Avenue NW, which is now the headquarters of Westphalia Press and the Policy Studies Organization. He drew plans and did a survey of the house, which are deposited in the Library of Congress. He studied to be an architect at Cornell (1893-1896) and the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris (1896-1903) where he learned about the Baha’i faith, and quickly adopted it.

In 1903, Remey returned to Washington, DC, and wrote numerous works on the Baha’i faith. He spent the majority of his time traveling to teach and discuss the Baha’i faith, and developing architectural plans, with the occasional class taught at George Washington University. Remey wrote extensively, and his papers are held at the National Baha’i Archives, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, Princeton University, Yale University, and the Iowa Historical Society.

 

Popular Guide to Homeopathy for Family and Private Use

by Smith & Worthington

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Many homeopathic guides have been created over time. This particular work is compiled from the standard works of Pulte, Laurie, Hempel, Ruddock, Burt, Verdi, and others, in order to offer twenty-eight homoeopathic remedies. Many quacks, charlatans and snake oil salesmen have roamed the world, claiming medical knowledge. This volume claimed to be a guide against them, suggesting better cures for cholera, small pox, poisoning and even drowning. Some of the cures include known toxins, such as belladonna and mercury. Obviously the work is offered only for historical interest, and not as medical advice!

 

 

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington: Volume VIII

by the Philosophical Society of Washington

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at Cosmos Club, in whose founding Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when Cosmos was founded, it was feared that Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all present members of Philosophical Society were invited to join as founding members of Cosmos. This volume demonstrates the extraordinary history of Society.

 

 

Bulletin of the Philosophical Society of Washington: Volume II

by the Philosophical Society of Washington

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The Philosophical Society of Washington was founded on March 13, 1871. It was preceded by gatherings at the home of Joseph Henry, the great scientist whose discoveries laid foundations for advances in magnetism and electromagnetism. Since 1887 it has met at Cosmos Club, in whose founding Philosophical members played a large part. In 1878, when Cosmos was founded, it was feared that Philosophical would start an alternative club, so all present members of Philosophical Society were invited to join as founding members of Cosmos. This volume demonstrates extraordinary history of the Society.

 

 

The Great Indian Religions: Being a Popular Account of Brahmanism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Zoroastrianism

by G. T. Bettany

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G. T. (George Thomas) Bettany (1850-1891) was born and educated in England, attending Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge University, studying medicine and the natural sciences. He also attended London University in 1871, taking a degree in geology, and later receiving an MA six years later. He lectured on biology, and botany. Bettany wrote numerous works of history on various subjects, including A Biographical History of Guy’s Hospital (1892), Life of Charles Darwin (1887), and A Sketch of the History of Judaism and Christianity in the Light of Modern Research and Criticism (1892). He also was the English editor of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. He died of heart disease at the age of 41.

 

 

Illustrated Sketches of Death Valley: and Other Borax Deserts of the Pacific Coast

by John R. Spears

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John R. Spears was born in 1850 in Van Wert, Ohio. Though an inveterate traveler, particularly out west, he ended up residing in Little Falls, New York. He wrote a great deal, particularly for the
New York Sun, and his books include The Port of Missing Ships and Other Stories of the Sea (1896), The Story of Nee England Whalers (1908), and The Story of the American Merchant Marine (1910). A great deal had been written about life in gold and silver mining camps, as well as the terrain surrounding them. However, Spears felt less attention had been paid to the desert, and wanted to depict the life in Death Valley, which he described as, “a gruesome story of a rugged  country…a story, too, of apparent paradoxes and of wonders.” Spears’ photographs offer a useful historical record of Death Valley, its people and animals, as they were in the 1890s.

 

 

Ongoing Issues in Georgian Policy and Public Administration

Edited by Bonnie Stabile and Nino Ghonghadze

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Thriving democracy and representative government depend upon a well functioning civil service, rich civic life and economic success. Georgia has been considered a top performer among countries in South Eastern Europe seeking to establish themselves in the post-Soviet era at the start of the 21st century. Georgia’s challenges in pubic administration reform provide unique illustrations of universal struggles of governance, including encouraging civic engagement, inculcating the values of public service, combatting corruption and nurturing economic development. Written from the vantage point of Georgian academics, many with first hand experience as public servants, in collaboration with US scholars, the chapters in this volume offer insights that should be of broad interest to public administrators and policymakers everywhere.

Bonnie Stabile is Director of the Master of Public Policy Program and Research Assistant Professor at the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University in Arlington, Virginia, USA.

Nino Ghonghadze is Professor at the Georgian Institute of Public Affairs in Tbilisi, Georgia.

 

 

For Rulers: Priming Political Leaders for Saving Humanity from Itself

by Yehezkel Dror

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In this striking book, Yehezkel Dror bravely goes where few authors dare, offering a big-picture view of the fateful choices facing the human species. He urges humankind to adopt unconventional survival and thriving strategies, including elevating the future of humanity above state interests, limiting the production and spread of dangerous knowledge and tools, and strengthening humanity’s collective deliberative capacity.

The author confronts the evolutionary trap of science and technology ensnaring unprepared humankind by providing it with awesome future-shaping power, which contemporary values and institutions are unable to handle. Dror warns that tribal and nationalist values, the inability to learn from history, and mediocre leadership will catastrophically endanger the future of human life, making radical, even painful, innovations essential.

According to Dror, the prevailing form of politics is obsolete. Instead, he argues urgently for a new type of political leader – “Homo Sapiens Governors” – willing and able to fulfill the daunting mission to save humanity from itself.

Recognizing that the tyrannical status quo will try to prevent essential transformations, Dror predicts new crises making what is still unthinkable clearly compelling – and that humankind will have to choose: learn rapidly to survive and thrive, or perish.

YEHEZKEL DROR is professor emeritus at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Recognized as a founder of modern policy studies, he integrates multi-disciplinary scholarship with extensive personal experience as a global advisor into a novel paradigm on alternative evolutionary futures of humanity – as shaped by fateful choices humanity has never before faced.

 

A Dictionary of Old English Music & Musical Instruments

by Jeffrey Pulver

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Jeffrey Pulver wrote numerous works on music, including Paganini, the Romantic Virtuoso, and Aids to Elementary Violin Playing. This particular work seeks to rescue and herald the English history of music, and to elevate it to the status of music found in France, Italy and other European nations in particular. The focus of this work in the words of Pulver:

“The history of music in England, dealing with the five centuries that lie between the period which made the Reading rota possible and the death of Purcell, is a story of unimaginable fascination. Yet in spite of the labours of a few faithful workers who fought, with weak weapons, to win their merited place for the musicians of England in the affection and regard of their countrymen, it was only comparatively recently that we awoke to the fact that our musical history is as glorious a one as that possessed by any other country of Europe.”

 

Cyrus Hall McCormick: His Life and Work

by Herbert N. Casson

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What would become the International Harvester Company, originally was known as the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company. The McCormicks were one of many who had developed farm machinery, but their company grew due to Cyrus McCormick’s attention to building marketing, sales and improved manufacturing. However, one aspect of McCormick Harvesting Machine Company growth that has rarely been acknowledged is the slave labor that built such dynasties in the United States. For McCormick, it was Jo Anderson, an enslaved man, whose genius and hard work helped build the mechanical reaper that would make the McCormicks very wealthy. Cyrus’ father, Robert, enslaved Anderson. Together they worked on developing a mechanical alternative to improve farming. Cyrus McCormick wrote of Anderson in his work, The Century of the Reaper:
“Jo Anderson was there, the Negro slave who, through the crowded hours of recent weeks, had helped build the reaper…Anderson deserves honor as the man who worked beside him in the building of the reaper. Jo Anderson was a slave, a general farm laborer and a friend.”

Anderson died sometime in 1888, and did not live to see the success of the machinery he toiled so hard on. Rather, even after the Civil War concluded, Anderson was not able to freely live in Virginia, and remained on the farm where his labor was hired out and he received only a portion of his earnings.

 

Los Dibujos de Heriberto Juarez / The Drawings of Heriberto Juarez

by Paul Rich

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Que los dibujos sean de la vida en Mexico no es sorprendente porque Juarez esta con stante y a veces traviesamente poniendo arte en la vida y obteniendo arte de la vida. No piensa que el arte sea algo que se produzca solamente en un estudio, o para tal caso, que deba ser mantenido en un museo y visto los domingos. Toma un plato en la cena y traza un boceto en el. Ve un espacio cercano a un area esco lar de juegos y quiere hacer una escultura que lo ocupe para que los ninos puedan jugar en ella. De manera importante, sus bocetos en este libro reflejan, como lo hacen sus esculturas, no sólo su espontaneidad sino su habilidad para comprender intelectualmente y perpetuar la esencia de lo que ve. Los dibujos son tanto espontáneos como intelectuales, lo que no es poca cosa. Eso indudablemente es magia.

That the drawings here are from life in México is not surprising because Juárez is constantly, and at times impishly, putting art into life and getting art from life. He doesn’t think of art as some thing that is done just in a studio or for that matter kept in museums and looked at on Sundays. He seizes a plate at dinner and does a sketch on it. He sees a space next to school playground and wants a sculpture occupying it that the children can play upon. Importantly, his sketches in this book reflect, as do his sculptures, not only this spontaneity but his ability to intellectually grasp and perpetuate the essence of what he sees. The drawings are both spontaneous and intellectual, which is no mean feat. It is indeed magic.

 

 

Dialogue in the Greco-Roman World

by Leslie Kelly, Ph.D.

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This short book is designed to introduce students of ancient history to the genre known as “the dialogue.” This literary form went through periods of popularity and decline in ancient Greece and Rome but it was present from the classical period through late antiquity and carried over into medieval and Byzantine culture. For all ancient texts, historians ask who created it, when, and why? They try to determine the author’s agenda and try to situate the text within its larger historical context. For the dialogue, we must do more than this. We must consider the conventions of the genre and read later compositions in light of earlier examples of the form. This book will explore the origins of dialogue in ancient

Greece and explain how dialogues of the Greco-Roman world were intended to be read. It will examine significant examples in the development of the genre from Greek, Roman, and early Christian cultures, and discuss the issues that students must take into account in order to responsibly utilize these sources to reconstruct and understand the past.

Dr. Leslie Kelly teaches at American Public University and holds advanced degrees in Jewish and Christian Scriptures, classics, and ancient history.

 

 

Issues in Maritime Cyber Security

Editors: Dr. Joe DiRenzo III, Dr. Nicole K. Drumhiller, Dr. Fred S. Roberts


The world relies on maritime commerce to move exceptionally large portions of goods, services, and people. Collectively this effort comprises the Maritime Transportation System or MTS. A major component of this daunting multifaceted enterprise are cyber networks, and the infrastructure they control. From the complex programs managing the loading and unloading of containers to waiting trucks, to the global navigation systems onboard vessels, to the hydraulic valves designed to protect spills into waterways that are located and controlled by cyber systems within chemical, water/wastewater, or petroleum plants, the MTS is becoming increasingly automated.

The impact of the cyber element on the international MTS is significant. Yet, with the clear advantages this brings, come vulnerabilities, and challenges. Researchers have demonstrated that it is possible to remotely take control of a vessel by spoofing its GPS. The news has reported attacks that shut down a floating oil rig by tilting it. The electronic positioning software systems on ships are vulnerable to attacks that could modify les and charts, causing potential for serious damage. The complexity of the problem of making our MTS safe from cyber attack is daunting and the need for all stakeholders in both government (at all levels) and private industry to be involved in cyber security is more significant than ever as the use of the MTS continues to grow.

While there is literature about the maritime transportation system, and about cyber security, to date there is very little literature on this converging area. This pioneering book is beneficial to a variety of audiences, as a text book in courses looking at risk analysis, national security, cyber threats, or

maritime policy; as a source of research problems ranging from the technical area to policy; and for practitioners in government and the private sector interested in a clear explanation of the array of cyber risks and potential cyber-defense issues impacting the maritime community.

About the Editors: Dr. Joe DiRenzo III is a retired Coast Guard Officer. Dr. Nicole K. Drumhiller is the Program Director of Intelligence Studies at American Military University. Dr. Fred S. Roberts is Director of the Department of Homeland Security University Center of Excellence CCICADA, based at Rutgers University.


Release date: July 2017

Pacific Hurtgen: The American Army in Northern Luzon, 1945

by Robert M. Young

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Too often in war many of its campaigns are forgotten. One such forgotten campaign occurred in the Philippines during the last year of World War II. American Army units fought a bitter battle against dug-in, fanatical Japanese soldiers on the Philippine island of Luzon. It was a campaign that need not have happened. American forces throughout the Pacific were on Japan’s doorstep but due to the immense power and personal desires of a singular commander, General Douglas MacArthur, the Philippines would once again become a major theater of the war. It did not bring the defeat of Japan any closer but did leave many thousands of American soldiers dead and tens of thousands wounded. In Europe, the American Army’s most wasteful campaign occurred in the Hurtgen Forest in 1944. Luzon would be the Pacific Hurtgen.

About the Author 
Dr. Robert Young received a B.A. from St. John’s University, an M.A. from Brooklyn College, and a Ph.D in Military History from the C.U.N.Y. Graduate Center. He is currently an Associate Professor at American Military University as well as a New York City High School History teacher. He is the author of numerous articles on World War II and post-Cold War conflicts. A New York City native and United States Army veteran, he currently lives in Long Island with his wife and two children.

 

 

Freemasonry, Politics and Rijeka (Fiume) (1785-1944)

by Ljubinka Toseva Karpowicz

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LJUBINKA TOŠEVA KARPOWICZ studied sociology and later political science at the Faculty of Political Sciences at the University of Belgrade. She received her Ph.D. from the Faculty of Political Sciences at the University of Ljubljana in 1987. She worked as a researcher in various institutes in Yugoslavia and Croatia. Prior to publishing her first book (written with a co-author) in 1990 (Sindikalni pokret u općini Rijeka do 1941. godine (The Union Movement in the Commune of Rijeka Until 1941)), she had published numerous articles concerning the political history of the city of Rijeka in Croatia, Serbia, Italy and Germany.

During her research in the archives of larger cities in various countries (Rijeka, Belgrade, Rome, Budapest and Washington, D.C.), she noted the activities of Masons within various political entities. This gave her the impetus to devote additional research to the empirical and historical analysis of Masonry as a special political group.

The result of her work was the publication in 2007 of her book D’Annunzio u Rijeci—Mitovi, politika i uloga masonerije (D’Annunzio in Rijeka—Myths, Politics and the Role of Masonry) which covers the period 12.IX. 1919 to 12. XI.1920. The book raised great interest and Lj.T. Karpowicz then focused her research over a longer time frame on the same theme.

In addition to the foregoing books, the author also published two additional books: Pravoslavna opština u Rijeci 1720-1868 (The Orthodox Commune in Rijeka 1720 -1868) (published in 2002), and Tajne Opatije—Tajna diplomacija i obavještajne službe u Opatiji 1890-1945 (Secrets of Opatija—Secret Diplomacy and Intelligence Agencies in Opatija 1890-1945). Lj.T. Karpowicz received the Award of the City of Rijeka in 2016, the committee making the award noting that her research had encouraged further investigation into the history of the city of Rijeka and assisted in promoting the reputation of Rijeka in the world.

The book Masonerija, politika i Rijeka (1785-1944) (Freemasonry, Politics and Rijeka (1785-1944) is the result of empirical and historical analysis of the work of Masonry from various states in Rijeka’s corpus separatum, a special political body in Central Europe. It analyzes the work of Austrian, Hungarian, French and Italian Masonry through numerous decades. It focuses on the work of the Hungarian wing of the Rite of Strict Observance, whose members served as Governors of Rijeka; the work of former exiled Hungarian politicians, who were Masons, after their return from Western Europe and their role in the establishment of Austria-Hungary (the Dual Monarchy); and discusses the specifics of Masonic organization in Hungary and its contributions to the development of Hungary’s special type of liberalism.

The greater part of the work concentrates on the efforts of Italian Irredentism in Rijeka in which intellectuals and Masons from Rijeka and Italy played a leading role. Some chapters analyze the work of Italian Masonry during the Fascist era, the military coup against the Free State of Fiume and the attempts to resurrect the Free State after the fall of Fascism. The appendices and supplements contain biographies of Rijeka’s Masons, as well as a report of the American Consul concerning an attack on the Palace of the President of the Free State of Fiume, the proclamation of the Rijeka’s Fascists concerning the attack on the provisional government, and a letter from the Rijeka’s Lodge Sirius to Belgrade’s Pobratim Lodge.

 

 

Nonprofit Organizations and Disaster: Individual, Organizational and Network Approaches to Emergency Management

Edited by Scott Robinson and Haley Murphy

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Disasters have become a more salient part of our life. Events ranging from terrorist attacks to major hurricanes to heatwaves can significantly disrupt our communities and place the most vulnerable among us at risk. The largest of these events—within seeming increasing frequency—test our communities’ capacity to handle these threats. These broad threats call for a broad range of responses—and responding organizations.

This text collects a series of perspectives on the role of charitable and nonprofit organizations in helping our communities address the threats served by natural and man-made disasters. The chapters introduce varying approaches that assess the nature of non-profit organizations responding to disasters from the personal to the systemic level. They leave the reader with an appreciation for the diverse roles that nonprofit organizations play in community disaster preparedness and response along with the challenges they face.

The contributions to this volume were selected by Scott E. Robinson and Haley Murphy from recent scholarship appearing in the academic journal Risk, Hazards, and Crisis in Public Policy. Scott E. Robinson is Professor and Bellmon Chair of Public Service in the Department of Political Science at the University of Oklahoma. Haley Murphy is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Oklahoma State University.

One Little Orchid: Mata Hari: A Marginal Voice

by Sanusri Bhattacharya

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“Her father was a subject of the Netherlands, and her mother was a Japanese. He died when she was an infant, and in order to protect her from the dangers which beset a young girl of mixed blood in the East, her mother fled from Java with her when she was three years old, and entered Burma. There, to further protect her, she pledged her to celibacy, and placed her in a Buddhist temple to learn dancing. After a dance at a great Buddhist festival in Burma, when she was almost fourteen years old, she saw a British officer and fell in love with him. It was her first love affair. She managed to escape from the temple and joined him … Finally they married. Two children, a boy and a girl, were born of their union … It is certain that she did not love her husband … The climax came when a maid whom she had beaten and discharged caused one of her gardeners to poison her infant son … She took a revolver, and, walking into the garden where the man was working, shot him dead.”
[“Dutch Dancer Spy.” The Southland Times. New Zealand. November 14, 1917.]

“Parisians have become very suspicious of late, but the surprise was general, nevertheless, when they discovered that their exotic favorite, Mata Hari, the Hindoo dancer, was a German spy. At the age of 17 she married a German who had obtained Dutch nationality in order to mask his spying work. The marriage was rather in the nature of a formal business transaction, but this did not prevent the ex-German officer from brutally ill-treating his young wife, whom he wounded on one occasion by a pistol shot. Nevertheless, she entered into the spy system with zest, became duly registered and paid, amused and delighted Paris for some years with her audacious performances, became acquainted with various highly-paid officials and politicians and found means, it is said, to make known to the Germans some of the most important French plans in the first months of the war, and subsequently informed them accurately of the departure of transports.”
[“Combing Out Hun Spies in France.” The Times. London. February 21, 1918.]

These are examples of wartime propaganda against Mata Hari that had been making the rounds in contemporary print media, which continued even after her execution. Most of these conspicuous falsities had been carefully promulgated by France in order to use her as a scapegoat during the wartime crises. In this book the author has tackled the challenge to expose the malicious intentions of the French government and also to show how Mata Hari had fallen prey to the then misogynic European society.

 

 

Patty Gray’s Journey from Boston to Baltimore: Stories for Children

by Caroline H. Dall

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Caroline Healy Dall (1822-1912) was a Transcendentalist who fought tirelessly for women’s rights. She was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and benefited from her family’s encouragement and funding of her continued education. In 1844, she married a Unitarian minister, Charles Dall. The pair moved to Toronto, but then back to Boston so that Caroline could raise their children while Charles went to Calcutta, India for missionary activities. While Caroline was in Boston, she became very active in the local Women’s Rights movement, and organized the New England Women’s Rights Convention. She worked closely with fellow suffragist Paulina Davis, and on developing a complimentary journal, Una. While she wrote a great deal on a whole variety of topics, she emphasized women’s rights, and transcendentalism.

This particular work is semi-autobiographical, as Dall tells of her experiences growing up during the period of slavery in the United States. Through her stories, some of the horrors of slavery and deeply ingrained racism are revealed.

This new edition is dedicated to the women of All Souls Unitarian Church in Washington.

 

The Old Spanish Missions of California: A Historical and Descriptive Sketch

by Paul Elder

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There were twenty one Spanish missions in California, established between 1769 and 1833 by Catholic priests to spread Christianity. Paul Elder collected various snippets of California history and compiled it in this work with quotes from various primary sources and photographs of numerous missions across the state, which presents a romanticized view of their founding. This work only portrays a partial and sanitized tale of the Spanish missions in California and their impact. The missions relied on agriculture to fund themselves, and sought to convert and colonize the Native people and their land. Multiple rebellions against the missions occurred since the missionaries sought to destroy native culture, and in the process, they transmitted communicable diseases which killed thousands. Missions did not just exist in California, but also Texas, Arizona, New Mexico and Florida.

 

Vampires and Vampirism: Collected Stories from Around the World

by Dudley Wright

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Dudley Wright’s fascinating work offers an academic treatment of the history of vampires. He traces the legend of vampires through history and around the world, making stops at Hungary, Britain, Russia, and various parts of what was then referred to as the Orient. He offers a collection of stories from these regions as well, so readers can draw their own conclusions.

Dudley Wright (1868-1950) is also an interesting character of note. He was born in England, and traveled throughout the world studying religions and other belief systems. He was a professional journalist and wrote for a variety of publications. He became the Assistant Editor of the Freemason and Masonic Editor of the Times of London, and other Masonic works. He spent a lot of his research on looking for a common thread to all religions, and wrote for numerous religious journals, such as Spiritual Power, the Homiletic Review, and the Bible Review. He flirted with various religious, including Buddhism and Catholicism, but he converted to Islam and ultimately returned to the Ahmadiyya movement.

 

Deep Sea Chanties: Old Sea Songs

by Frank Shay, Illustrated by Edw. A. Wilson, Introduction by William McFee

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Deep Sea Chanties offers a unique lens upon seafaring life punctuated with fabulous woodcut illustrations by Edward A. Wilson. From the editor, Frank Shay: “In bringing these songs together I have sought to catch for the moment the spirit of the men of the clipper-ship era. That glorious period, marked roughly by the Mexican War and the California gold rush, is finding perpetuation in the enthusiasms of those who love the sea and ships. Ship models, romances and tales of the sea, log books and nautical instruments so eagerly sought after by these enthusiasts are, after all, but outward symbols of the men who trod the decks and warped and reefed the sails. Those deeds were not accomplished with out song and the songs they sang were from their own souls: not written for them by poets and ballad-mongers. In reading them we are made privy not only to the singer but to the audience: their thoughts, their lives, and their environment.”

This new edition is dedicated to India D’Avignon, lifelong champion of the importance of music in our daily lives.

 

The Laws of Ecarte: The Laws of Écarté, Adopted by The Turf and Portland Clubs with a Treatise on the Game

by Cavendish

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In the 19th century, Écarté was all the rage. The name is French for ‘discarded’ as the two player game focuses on each playing working to get rid of undesirable cards, and negotiating with the dealer for a set of potentially better cards. The game requires a lot of quick thinking, shuffling, bluffing and luck. It is somewhat similar to Euchre, which was popular in the United States. Although the game can be played with a simple card deck, the rules can become large and cumbersome, or minimal, depending on the players’ preference. This work offers a look at various rules and styles of playing Écarté.

 

A History of Shorthand, Written in Shorthand

by Isaac Pitman

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Isaac Pitman (1813-1897) lived a fascinating and varied life. He was born in England, and earned his teaching credential from the British and Foreign School Society. He began teaching in Lincolnshire. After marrying in 1835, he started his own school in Gloucestershire, where he taught for a few years before moving to Bath and starting another school there in 1839. More so than teaching perhaps, Pitman was interested in language, transmission and the printed word. He stopped teaching in 1843 in order to run his printing and binding business. As part of his business’ outputs, he published his own works which forwarded the argument for standardized spelling, including Phonotypy in 1844. Previous to this, he published Sound-Hand, a book on a system of phonetically based shorthand. He began a distance learning course, arguably the first of its kind, where he would work with students on their shorthand through the mail, sending work and critiques to each student. His work was very well received; so much so that by 1886, a million copies of his work, The Phonographic Teacher, were sold. Pitman credited his ability to carry on so many pursuits to his adoption of a vegetarian diet and abstinence from alcohol. He was also devoutly a follower of Swedenborgianism. For all his activity, in 1894, he was knighted by Queen Victoria.

History of Shorthand is written in shorthand, but the back of the book offers a basic look at the language, and transcribing the book provides and opportunity to learn the writing method.

 

Washington Bookplates: Six Articles Reprinted from The Town Crier, 1925-1926

by Frederick Starr

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On November 11, 1889, Washington became the 42nd state of the United States. The state worked to put together the appropriate bureaucracies and other earmarks of its new status. As it came together, Frederick Starr, who had moved there, felt, among other things, the area could use a census of bookplates of the region. In Washington Bookplates, Starr examines several bookplates in detail, discussing, the owners’ intentions behind the illustrations, the artists and, of course, ties to Washington state. Bookplates with only a tangential link to a Washington author or owner are included as well. Washington Bookplates offers a look at historical design processes, publications and the creation of a state.

This new edition is dedicated to Dr. Albert Keller, remembering Harvard and Dunster days.

 

Practical Falconry: To Which is Added, How I Became a Falconer

by Gage Earle Freeman

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Gage Earle Freeman (1820-1903) wrote a number of articles on falconry. He was introduced to the sport in England and retained a life-long interest in it, often working with kestrel-hawks, peregrine falcons, and sparrow hawks. He was also an esteemed poet, winning four Seatonian Prizes; a father to ten children, and married twice. He attended St. John’s College, Cambridge, graduating in 1845 with a B.A. and became an ordained priest in 1847, receiving his M.A. in 1850. In 1889, he became a vicar and a private chaplain to the Earl of Lonsdale, and remained in that position until his death.

This new edition is dedicated to the Duke of St. Albans, remembering school days in Judde House, Tonbridge.

 

Herbert Hoover: A Reminiscent Biography

by Will Irwin

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Herbert C. Hoover (1874-1964) served one term as President of the United States, from 1929, until 1933. He met his wife, Lou Henry, who was the only female Geology major at Stanford University, while he attended there. The pair delayed marriage so Lou could finish her education, while Herbert could build his career abroad. He was a very successful mining engineer, and later became known for his humanitarian efforts during World War I, particularly for his aid to Belgium, while he led the U.S. Food Administration. Lou was a very successful scholar, learning Latin, Chinese and continuing her work in studying metallurgy, but it was slowed down by her raising of their two children, Herbert Charles Hoover and Allan Henry Hoover.

After his only eight months in office, the Great Depression occurred. Despite attempts to control it, including the Hoover Dam, and other large public infrastructure projects, and various attempts to push for higher wages, his efforts failed. He also supported Prohibition, which made him even less popular. He was overwhelmingly defeated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1932 election. Hoover remained near politics, as a vocal opponent of federal government growth. After World War Ii, he served in a few government roles, particularly those seeking to improve efficiency and foreign relations in Europe.

This new edition is dedicated to Richard Sousa, long an important part of the Hoover Institution