The Spanish Borderlands: A Chronicle of Old Florida and the Southwest

by Herbert E. Bolton

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The Spanish Borderlands focuses on the areas between Florida and California, and the influence that Spanish conquistadores held. The work is broken into two sections, with the first highlighting exploration of the region by Spaniards, and the latter half of the book looking at these areas as colonies. Bolton examines the complex relationships between Spaniards, the numerous individual Native American tribes in the colonized regions, and other colonizing bodies, such as the French.Herbert E. Bolton (1870-1953) was an American historian who examined history through a complex lens over time, rather than as an isolated force, as was popular with historians like Frederick Jackson Turner whom Bolton studied under. Bolton found it crucial to examine the variety of people, along with their cultures, histories and motivations and its impact on the fabric of the United States. Early in his career, Bolton taught early European history at the University of Texas, but after research in Mexico he turned his focus towards the Spanish colonization of the Americas. In 1911, he became a professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley, with his specialty being the History of the Americas.

 

This new edition is dedicated to Daniel Tapia Quintana, Harvardian, shrewd observer of the border and its political and social anomalies.

 

 

 

 

Nietzsche in Outline & Aphorism

by A. R. Orage

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Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a philosopher, a poet, and a scholar. Unfortunately, he suffered from poor health, which caused him to resign from his position as the Chair of Classical Philology, which he held at the age of 24. At 44, he was so ill that his mother, and then his sister had to care for him until his death at the page of 55. Nietzsche wrote on numerous subjects, but is commonly associated with nihilism, critiques of Christian morality, and his strong opposition to anti-Semitism and nationalism. There was a brief time when his sister reworked his manuscripts to favor Nazi ideology, but the correct manuscripts were uncovered.Alfred Richard Orage was born in January 1873 and lived until November 1934. He was a scholar, writer, teacher, political organizer, publisher, and socialist.This is a reprint work.

 

 

 

 

The Quaker of the Future Time

by George A. Walton

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The William Penn Lectures were put together by the Young Friends Movement of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting. George A. Walton was a member of the organization, and gave this lecture. In it, among other principles, he discusses the impact labor has on the current world. He advocates for living faith in one’s work, and to ensure that it has meaning and value to both the material and the spiritual realms. Walton gave this speech in 1916 and was responding to many changes in society at the time, although his work still resonates today. George A. Walton was born in 1883. He went on to become the headmaster of the George School in 1912, a Quaker boarding school, where he served until 1948. In 1969, Walton passed away. His papers are held by Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College.

 

 

 

 

Unitarian Affirmations: Seven Discourses Given in Washington, D.C.

by Seven Unitarian Ministers

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Unitarianism is a theological movement which at its start proclaimed that God is a singular entity, rather than a trinity. It rejects other tenants common in Christianity, such as the concept of original sin and the Bible as infallible. The belief emerged during the 1600s and spread quickly through Europe and the United States, particularly among the educated and wealthy classes. One of the earliest places it arrived in the United States was in New England. These lectures were originally given during the late 1890s, and focus on a variety of theological debates, such as the Bible, the Church, and the afterlife.

 

 

 

 

History of the Fraternal Order of Eagles

by J. Fanning O’Reilly

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The Fraternal Order of Eagles is an international fraternal organization that was founded on February 6, 1898 in Seattle, Washington by a group of six theater owners. It was initially composed of those who worked within the performing arts. The first meetings were typically social gatherings held on theater stages. As the organization grew, they began to seek out positive changes to make in society. They are considered to be the driving force behind Social Security and Mother’s Day. Members also began to create a unique identity, such calling their lodges “aeries” and adopting the bald eagle as their emblem. Unfortunately, racism was also ingrained in the organization. To become a member, an applicant had to be 21 years old, of good character, not a Communist and be of Caucasian background. The requirement to be white was removed by the late 1970s, but it remained very difficult for minorities to become members.

 

 

 

 

Why Thirty-Three?: Searching for Masonic Origins

by S. Brent Morris, PhD, Introduction by Wallace E. Boston, Jr.

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The papers presented here represent over twenty-five years of publications by S. Brent Morris. They explore his many questions about Freemasonry, usually dealing with origins of the Craft. What “high degrees” were in the United States before 1830? What were the activities in the United States before 1801 of the Order of the Royal Secret, the precursor of the Scottish Rite? How did American grand lodges form as they broke away from England? Who were the Gormogons; how did they get started; what happened to them? Why does the Scottish Rite have thirty-three degrees?A complex organization with a lengthy pedigree like Freemasonry has many basic foundational questions waiting to be answered, and that’s what this book does: answers questions.

S. Brent Morris, 33°, Grand Cross, is Managing Editor of the Scottish Rite Journal, the largest circulation Masonic magazine in the world. He retired after twenty-five years as a mathematician with the federal government and has taught at Duke, Johns Hopkins, and George Washington Universities. He is Past Master of Patmos Lodge No. 70, Ellicott City, Maryland, and Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London; a Fellow and Mackey Scholar of the Scottish Rite Research Society; a Fellow of the Philalethes Society; an honorary Fellow of the Phylaxis Society; founding Editor of Heredom, the transactions of the Scottish Rite Research Society; indexer of Ars Quatuor Coronatorum; and Past Grand Abbot of the Society of Blue Friars. He is the author of Magic Tricks, Card Shuffling, and Dynamic Computer Memories; two U.S. patents; nine technical articles; and is author or editor of over forty books on Freemasonry including Complete Idiot’s Guide to Freemasonry and Is It True What They Say About Freemasonry? (with Arturo de Hoyos).

 

 

 

 

black and white image of two people and the title in a teal box above them

Mesmerism and Christian Science: A Short History of Mental Healing

by Frank Podmore

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Frank Podmore was born on February 5, 1856 and died by drowning on August 14, 1910. During his life, he focused on two major projects. One was advancing socialism in Britain, and to support his belief in incremental changes to bring about socialism, rather than a revolution, he founded the Fabian Society in 1884. The other project Podmore was passionate about was the paranormal. He wrote a great deal to debunk or otherwise offer scientific explanations to paranormal activity. In this work, which was well received by the The British Journal of Psychiatry, then referred to as the Journal of Mental Science, Podmore investigates claims of mesmerism, and argues that it may have some impact on treating gout, among other things. Podmore also gives a bit of background on leading figures practicing other forms of faith healing, such as Kenelm Digby and Paracelsus.