A Manual of Ancient Sculpture, Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek, Roman: With One Hundred and Sixty Illustrations

by George Redford FRCS

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On October 26, 1895, George Redford passed away after an illness. He had lived 80 years, his life spanning very different callings. He was remembered as one being well traveled in art circles, a fan of the old masters in particular. As the art correspondent for the London Times, his judgments were well regarded. He was worked with the Art Treasures Exhibition of Manchester, as well as serving as a Commissioners of the Leeds Exhibition. He was Registrar of the Crystal Palace Collection of Sculpture in 1853-1854; Curator of the Art Treasures Exhibition in Manchester, 1857; and Commissioner for the National Exhibition of Works of Art, Leeds, 1868. His memorable art library was sold by Christie’s, London, on 18 March 1890.

Redford had a very interesting and varied life. He was not always involved in art, as he was once on the battlefield. Redford was a medical professional who had served in the Army Medical Service during the Crimean War.

 

Wood Sculpture: From Ancient Egypt to the End of the Gothic Period

by Alfred Maskell F.S.A.

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Alfred Maskell was an artist, primarily a photographer, who worked tirelessly to advance the art. He was a member of The Linked Ring, an invitation-only group that wanted to advance photography as an art form. Members encouraged experimentation with the photographic process. The organization was founded in 1892 by Maskell, with George Davison and Henry Van der Weyde. The Linked Ring was at its peak between its founding, until roughly 1909. Maskell, along with Robert Memachy, helped to develop the gum-bichromate printing, which is able to create a unique painterly image from negatives.

 

Oration on the Unveiling of the Statue of Samuel Francis DuPont: Rear Admiral, U.S.N., at Washington, DC on December 20, 1884

by Hon. Thomas F. Bayard

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Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont (1803-1865) served in the United States Navy, specifically during the Mexican- American War and the Civil War. His uncle, Eleuthere Irenee du Pont, was the founder of what is commonly known as the DuPont chemical concern, but is officially E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. Du Pont’s family was unable to financially support his education, so Samuel enlisted in the Navy. His family’s connections allowed him to receive appointment to midshipman by President James Madison. He had an illustrious until questions about his judgment in an attempt to capture Charleston during the Civil War became an issue when the blockade failed. Du Pont was so anguished by this that he relieved himself of command on July 5, 1863. Later events proved that he was not at fault, and nearly two decades after his death in 1865, a bronze sculpture of Du Pont was dedicated on December 20, 1884. It was replaced in 1921 by a memorial fountain that still stands today, one that was sculpted by Daniel Chester French and designed by Henry Bacon.

The statue was moved by the Du Pont family in 1920 to Wilmington, Delaware. Dupont Circle is a popular attraction for locals and tourists alike in DC. The location has slowly changed its name from Du Pont to Dupont, so this work illustrating the deeds for which the area received its namesake is especially important.

This edition is dedicated to Patricia Fitzgerald, the amiable mainstay of the Women’s National Democratic Club, longtime Dupont Circle anchor.